(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Town Topics (Princeton), Apr. 17, 1991"

Pay Hike of 6.75% Approved for Township 
Police 3 

Griggs Farm Sales Strong During Month 
Of April 5 

Republicans Name Three Candidates 
For Borough Council g 

Borough Patrolman in Forefront of Fund 
Raising for Special Olympics 14 

Area Performing Arts Croups Hit Hard 
By Recession 19 

Negotiations Continuing on Contract for 
School Administrators 48 



/ VOL. XLLI, NO. 6 



Wednesday, April 17, 1991 



Bank of New York Is Foreclosing 
.On Palmer Square's Hulfish North 



40<t at all newsstands 



The Bank of New York has 
filed to foreclose on the 
Hulfish North section of Palm- 
er Square — the final, and still 
incomplete, piece in the Col- 

r lins Corporation redevelop- 
ment plan for the Square. The 
company has been unable to 
repay the $40 million it borrow- 
ed from the bank five years 
ago to complete the garage, 
offices, and stores in Hulfish 
North. 

The bank's action is not ex- 
pected to affect the rest of 
Palmer Square, which re- 
mains under Collins owner- 

, ship and management. 

Collins had intended to bor- 
row against the completed 
buildings in order to build the 
additional 97 townhouses 
planned for Hulfish North. The 
soft real estate market, how- 
ever, made banks wary of res- 
idential real octate. and Collins 
was unable to obtain the mon- 
ey it needed. 

Company President Arthur 
Collins said the problem was 
that there are no institutions 
putting out construction mon- 
ey today for residential pro- 
jects. "Where we ran into trou- 



ble was in continuing to pay 
the debt service." 

Hulfish North — the Palm- 
er Square buildings located 
north of Hulfish Street — con- 
sists of four separate buildings 
and a garage. Seventeen con- 
dominiums, which remain un- 
sold, are contained in three of 
the buildings, which also con- 
tain office space and retail 
stores. 

The rest of Palmer Square 
consists of the residential and 
retail section and the Nassau 
Inn. The retail section is com- 
pletely leased, said Collins 
Vice President Jerry Berner, 
and business at the Nassau 
Inn is improving, with an oc- 
cupancy rate higher than ever 
before. 

The Nassau Inn, however, 

continues to owe the Borough 

$365 thousand in 1990 taxes. 
Mr. Colfinsnas said that tnis 

sum will be paid within the 
next few months. 

Up until now, Collins Devel- 
opment has managed all three 
sections of the Square. Bor- 
ough Mayor Marvin Reed said 

Continued on Pago 48 




Bush to Speak Here: 

At University May 10 

President George Bush 
has accepted an invitation 
from Princeton University to 
speak Friday, May 10, at 
ceremonies dedicating new 
and renovated facilities for 

♦ha ennial crionroc rtn nam- 

pus. 

The president, who will 
also receive an honorary 
degree in a private cere- 
mony in the Faculty Room 
in Nassau Hall, is being en- 
couraged by University of- 



Continued on Next Pago 



Growing Dissatisfaction Voiced 
About This Year's School Budget 



In Princeton, where School 
Board election turnout is low 
and school budgets are 
routinely, passed, there is 
growing controversy and a 
sense of mounting dissatisfac- 
tion about this year's school 
budget. 

In spite of what felt like 
Equatorial heat, the John 
Witherspoon Middle School 
cafeteria was jammed for last 
Tuesday night's budget hear- 
ing. Somewhat less crowded 
for the Thursday night hear- 
ing, the discussion still drew 
close to 100 people. 

The Tuesday night diehards 
heard a fair amount of new in- 
formation on the $1.7 million 
in cuts that will be necessary 
to fit the 1 991 -92 budget within 
the 7.5 percent State cap. 

Library assistants will be 
eliminated at the three 
miaffle~MTiW h SbWTVe , &P 
dent Joel Cooper said it would 
seem difficult to perform li- 
brary services with one 
librarian, and questioned the 
equity of having one librarian 
in the middle school and three 
in the high school. 



Because of a reduction of 
two elementary school 
teachers, the average class 
size in the elementary schools 
will go from 21 to 22 or 23. The 
middle school will no longer 
have the drama program it has 
shared with the high school. It 
will also lose its fifth grade 
foreign language program and 
one guidance counsellor. The 
nonathletic extracurricular 
program will be cut by 50 per- 
cent and several sports will be 
eliminated. These include 
girls' basketball, girls' softball, 
and boys' lacrosse. 

The high school will no 
longer offer classes of fewer 
than eight students. Those 
that appear to be on the chop- 
ping block include Latin and 
several German, Italian, and 
French classes. The elimina- 
tion of five coaches will lead 
iVtrfr,ilYcV?V l cr i SlSlMi5r v-aYsiiy of- 
ferings in girls' basketball, 
football, winter track, wres- 
tling, and men's lacrosse. 



Gerard B. Lambert Award Winners 

Ed Obert and Irene Farley ^^^^^^ MI ^^ 
have been chosen to receive 
the 1991 Gerard B. Lambert 
Awards for community ser- 
vice. The highest honor the 
United Way Princeton Area 
Communities can bestow 
upon volunteers, the awards 
will be presented at United 
Way's annual dinner meeting 
Tuesday at the Hyatt Regen- 
cy Princeton. 

Mr. Obert is captain of the 
Princeton First Aid and 
Rescue Squad, a position he 
has held for 12 of the almost 
19 years he has been a mem- 
ber of the squad. Mrs. Farley's 
volunteer efforts over three 
decades have been on behalf 
of the New Jersey Neuro- 
psychiatry Institute (now the 
North Princeton Developmen- 
tal Center), Princeton Medical 
Center and Eden Institute, as 
well as other civic organiza- 
tions. 



The high school will see the 
elimination of the Family Con- 
sultation Center. A learning 
. consultant will be cut from the 

for Community Service Are Named cwid study teams 

The orchestra leader hired 
two years ago in a national 
search, Robert Loughran, is 
also expected to go. A half 
dozen students came to the 
Thursday meeting to object to 
this. 




Ed Obert 

The Lambert Awards were 
initiated in 1954, a time when 
the Community Chest was at 
a lowfebb, having difficulty 
getting people to lead it and 



Irene Farley 



struggling to meet its cam- 
paign goal. William P. Sword 
went to Gerard B. Lambert as 
a leading citizen and the big- 
gest Community Chest con- 



tributor and suggested an 
award named for him to rec- 
ognize the dedicated efforts of 
volunteers in the community. 
Presented at the annual din- 
ner the award would be a way 
of enhancing and calling at- 
tention to the Community 
Chest. 

The Lambert Award is pre- 
sented annually "to that per- 
son (or persons) who by his or 
her service over a protracted 
period has demonstrated suf- 
ficient caring about other peo- 
ple to have given something of 
himself or herself — thought, 
time, energy, money, leader- 
ship, love, etc. — in an 
unselfish effort to make life 
better for those living in and 
around Princeton." 

The 1991 recipients ex- 
emplify this description. Both 
are consummate, longtime 



Continued on Page 49 



"I feel there is a real prob- 
lem if Mr. Loughran is cut from 
the budget," said one student. 
"The orchestra has been 
through a lot and he brought 
it back." 

"Mr. Loughran certainly has 
a lot of energy and enthusi- 
asm," said another. "We 
don't want him to go. We're all 
here because we like our or- 
chestra teacher very much." 

High School Interim Prin- 
cipal Marylu Coviello pointed 
out that several people have 
the proper certification at the 
high school, and that the music 

Continued on Page 48 




TRUNK SHOW 
April 19 & 20 

derrick's 

■y *~- ..—. . on ^Noore 

Distinctive Clothing For Women i*» 

See our ad on page 4. 




SPRING INTO FASHION 

SUSAN 
GREENE 

WE HAVE IT ALU! 

See our ad on page 1 0. 



Men's & Women's Clarks 
SALE 20% OFF 

Hulit's Shoes 

See our Ad on page 23. 



I Town Topics 



(ISSN0191-7056) 



Pubitatwd Ev«fy W»drw«*ay 
Throughout tt» Ymt 



a 
< 

a 

Si 


Dooald C. Siuan 
1914-1961 


Dan Coyto 
1916-1973 


* 


Founding Editors 
and Publishers 


-i 
Z 


OonakJ C Stuart til 
Editor and PuNlahat 


Z 

o 

& 

o 

z 


Myrna Boars* 

Ptesion R Eckmodor Jr. 

Barbara L Johnson 

Aaalatanl Edltora 


c 
a 

8 

a. 
O 

r- 


Unda Sproehnls 
Advartlalng Managor 


Martha Moots 
Advartlalng RoproMnUrtlvt 


Z 

r- 


Marlon Burdtck 

Don Gilpin 

Hollar McAlpIn 

William McCloary 

Nancy Plum 

Jean Stratton 

Contributing Edltora 



Subacrlpllon Ratas: He par yoa/ (NY. NJ, 
PA); S20-S23 alaowbara In US; $12 00 for six 
montha. Hlghor outalde US; 40 canla at all 

rwwss lands 



4 Harcor Slraot 

r Prlncaton, NJ 
Talapnon* 924-2300 



Second CIsm Poalag* PaJd ml Princeton, NJ. 
Poatmaalar Sand address changes lo Town 
Topic*, P.O. Box 664, Prlncoion. NJ 08542- 

VOL XLLI. NO 6 

Wednesday, April 17, 1991 

President Bush 

Continued from Page 1 

ficials to use the occasion to 
make a major address on the 
policies of his administration. 
University officials learned last 
week that he will accept the in- 
vitation. 
The public ceremony will 



WccnnWff 



Shoes tor the 

Discriminating 

150 NASSAU sireb 

PRINCETON. NEW JERSEY 



*5? 



1 take place at 11 in the plaza off Hall houses the Economics year in the Central Business 
Prospect Avenue surrounded Department and is the gift of District, especially in light of 
by the new Fisher-Bendheim Doris and Donald Fisher and the State's repaying of Nassau 
building (housing the Econom- their three sons, all Princeton street this summer, 
ics Department and the Center graduates. The Borough's plans current- 

of International Studies, The curved front of Fisher \ y include reconstruction of 
respectively) ; newly renovated Hall encloses the Jacoby Li- Witherspoon Street, Palmer 
Corwin Hall, home of the Poli- brary, gift of Robert Jacoby Square, and Chambers Street, 
tics Department; and Robert- '51, which will be dedicated in as we u as Vandeventer Ave- 
son Hall, primary locus of the the same ceremony, as will the nue Moore Street, and Park 
Woodrow Wilson School of library in Robertson Hall which place. 
Public and International Af- has had a major facelift and is Work on the latter three 
fairs. named the Vincent and Celia streets has already begun. It is 

Scully Library in honor of the possible, however, that the 

Some 750 trustees, donors, parents of the donor, John H. scope of the Witherspoon/ 
alumni, faculty staff, students Scully, Class of 1966. Palmer Square/Chambers pro- 

and other invited guests are ex- ject might be scaled back from 

peeled to attend the outdoor „.. - /-.nnsnliHatinn three to one or two streets in or- 
ceremony. Princeton President * tU( y °' i-onsoiwation der ^ redu( , e ^ , eve , of roa(j 
Harold T. Shapiro and James Topic of New Ordinance reconstruction this year in the 
A. Henderson, chairman of the Borough Council last week in- Borough, 
trustee executive committee, troduced an ordinance that This possibility is expected to 
are also scheduled to speak, WO uld place the question of be discussed at the Council 
and the Princeton University whether to form a joint muni- meeting scheduled for Tues- 
Orchestra will play. c j pa i consolidation study com- day, April 16. 

President Bush is the second m i ss i on n the November 
U.S. president invited by ballot. A public hearing is 
Princeton to speak at a dedica- scheduled for May 14. 
tion ceremony. Twenty-five Council also approved four 
years ago, on May 11, 1966, capital ordinances that put the 
President Lyndon Johnson ded- municipality in a position to fi- 
icated Robertson Hall in a nance its two major 1991 road 
similar outdoor ceremony and reconstruction projects. 

received an honorary degree. 

Merchants raised strong ob- 

The president is not the only jections to the level of road 
member of his Administration work scheduled to be done this 
to have been invited to the 
Princeton campus this spring. 
Although the identity of honor- 
ary degree recipients is tradi- 
tionally a closely guarded se- 
cret at Princeton, the fact that 
Secretary of State James 
Baker, Princeton '52, is 

scheduled to receive an honor- 
ary degree has leaked out and 

seems to be well known on 

campus. 
In addition, Admiral William 

Crowe, former chair of the 

Joint Chiefs of Staff during the 

Reagan Administration, will 

give the Baccalaureate address 

in the Princeton University 

Chapel June 9. 

The Fisher-Bendheim build- 
ing, designed by Robert Ven- 

turi and his partner Denise 

Scott Brown, is actually two 

buildings joined but with two 

separate entrances. Fisher 



The Educated 




VPS SHIPfttrS MCCtPTfO 

Inc. 




plciymobil 




Creativity., 
Imagination.. 
Fun... 



Mon, Tubs, Wed & Fri 9:30-6; Thurs 9:30-8; Sat 9:30-5 
Pennington Shopping Center, Pennington, NJ • (609)737-1440 



>^>^»»^>>»»>^>3 



n 



FLEA MARKET 



TOWN TOPICS 

is 
printed entirely 

on 
recycled paper 



:■•••: 



Town Topics Readers 

In the last few weeks we have made several changes in 
our delivery. Some areas have new drivers while other 
areas have been added to the postal delivery.. If you 
are experiencing any problem with your delivery or 
would like your name on the mailing label, please call 
us at 924-2200. We would very much like to hear from 
you. 



m 



n 



Sponsored by: 

LADIES AUX PRINCETON 
ELKS LODGE #2129 

Lodge Home - Rte. 518 - Blawenburg 

Bake Sale - Refreshments 
April 27th, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m. 

Tables or Space $10.00 
Phone: Jean 201-359-2920 
Lee 609-921-3993 
(11 a.m. - 5 p.m.) 
609-924-6963 

RAIN OR SHINE 






\ 



E 
1 



y 






8 



: 8? 



5^€€€<f€€€€€€-i:€€€« 



Recycling « 

Borough 
this Monday 

Township 
this Tuesday 



INDEX 

Art 38 

Business 51 

Calendar of the Week... 35 

Classified Ads 52-72 

Clubs 24 

Current Cinema 30 

Engagements 25 

Mailbox 22 

Music 32 

New to Us 26 

Obituaries 52 

People 50 

Religion 51 

Sports 39 

Theatres 28 

Topics of the Town 3 

Trenton Roundup 7 




*^ > ' * ' ^'?*47*&*&"^<&»^C&*&*&*i^i^a^*47i< j ^&*^ 



PRINCETON JUNIOR SCHOOL 



i°*r\ ir\ tVie Setohd- ferine . 
f\Art 1 UrK ,hCUV 
TUe people i k ScUoUTe, f«h-- 
W£ Of ex- - tb PW v , WW Uof K is iok e 

Ar.4, '.W |At*S'i<. ">*■ OjrZ-f Vo 9"w« 
I o.vr\ ih Ornie H 

7Thl I wirW So uert^o^ • 

A\ex G-roAiesIL 
Now accepting 
applications for Grades I -IV 
for September 1991 

We believe that academic excellence later in life Is 
largely due to an enthusiasm for learning Inspired during 
the early years when a child's motivation Is high and 
his/her chances for success are good. Students in our 
program In no way leave childhood behind for the sole 
purpose of intellectual growth. Rather, they celebrate the , 
special gifts of their age: curiosity, flexibility, spontaneity, ^ 
will, and wonder. \ 

We do not discriminate egalnst race, color or creed. J 

Headmistress Juliana Cuyler Mclntyre § 

921 -21 08 or 924-81 26 § 



Spring Sale 

25%-50 % Off 



Now thru Saturday, April 20th 




MISSES SPORTSWEAR 

SPRING COORDINATES 25% - 50% off 

selected groups by Jeanne Pierre, Evan 
Picone, Scott McClintock, Aileen Sport, Emo 
and more, sizes 6-16. reg. 30-110. 
SPRING SWEATERS 25% off 

hand knit styles by Jennifer Reed, sizes s-m-l. 
100% cotton novelty intarsias. reg. 98-112. 
SPRING SHORT SETS • 39 80 

stripes, dots & novelties in a poly/cotton blend, 
sizes s-m-l-xl. reg. 60. 

SPRING SKIRTS & PANTS 25% - 50% off 
selected styles in twills and blends-. Many 
spring colors, sizes 6-16. reg. 48-80. ■ 
SPRING CAMP SHIRTS 25"° 

short sleeve cotton styles in spring solid colors, 
sizes 6-16. reg. 36. 



SPRING PETITE COORDINATES 25%-50%off 

selected groups by Carole Little, Leslie Fay, 
tvleiT'rsa Christina, "That Wiz" and more, sizes 
2-12. reg. 36-150. 

MISSES ACCESSORIES 

SPRING LEATHER HANDBAGS 49 90 

selected styles in white, bone, black & navy. 

reg. 75. 

SPRING DESIGNER SILK SCARVES 1/3 off 

selected colorful prints & solids, reg. 20-38. 

SPRING ESPRIT HANDBAGS 18" 

mini barrel style, reg. 28. 

SPRING LINEN HANDBAGS 1/2 off 

with embossed lizard trim. reg. 35-64. 

SPRING TRAVEL ACCESSORIES 25% off 

every style and print, reg. 13-40. 



> 




RIDGEWOOD 652-2100 • SUMMIT 277-1777 • WAYNE 785-1700 • CALDWELL 226-3700 
• WESTFIELD Ladies 232-4800. Children 233-1 111 > PRINCETON 609-924-3300 



Congratulations 

BRIAN 
WILLIAMS 

For being invited to play 

on the U.S.A. Boys' 

Ail-American 

Basketball Team. 

Best Regards 
VJ.T. 

CRECCO's 

BAR & RESTAURANT 
Trenton 



1 



^ MRK er 

\ PLANT SALE TODAY 

8: 5 



^ 




OLD CLOCKS 
REPAIRED 

For Appointment Call: 

609-921-7015 






CLARIDGE 

Princeton Shopping Center 

Wine of the Month • 



TRAPICHE 

Cabernet Sauvignon Chardonnay 
Reserve $6.59 $ 5.79 

Excellent value wines from Argentina 



Open 7 Days 



924-5700 



Free Parking 






Clothes For All; 
Occasions 

63 No. Main St. > 
Cranbury, N.J. 
6SS-2020 
M-F 10-5; Sat 10-4 



STONY BROOK GARDEN CLUB members, from left, Barbara Delafield, Audrey 
Gates, Janet Haring, and Alice Eno prepare for the 30th annual May Market, 
to be held on Hulfish Street, behind the Nassau Inn, from 4 to 6 on May 8 and 
from 8 to 5 on May 9. 

Salary Hike Approved for Township Police 
After Months of Negotiation & Arbitration 



^ 



J WE REPAIR ^ 

candelabras, 

pottery & china, 

silver & brass, 

wood inlays, 

decorative trim, 

lamps & fixtures, 

figurines, 

jewelry, 

toys & dolls, or 

ANY ITEM 

beautiful or 

merely interesting 

and smaller than 

a breadbox . 

TOM PIPECARVER 
4 Spring Street 
!l Princeton 

k 921-0860 

X —, — - 



Without a word of comment 
or elucidation. Township Com- 
mittee approved a 6.75 percent 
salary hike for Township police 
officers on Monday night. 

Although the contract with 
the 30 police officers who are 
represented by the Policemen's 
Benevolent Association has 
been the subject of months of 
negotiation and even arbitra- 
tion, the resolution to approve 
the contract was placed far 
down on the "consent agenda," 
rp laundry list of routine items 
which are assumed to be non- 

ther discussion among Com- 
mittee or amplification to the 
public. 

A motion to approve the 

i whole agenda is seconded and 

j voted in a voice vote. The idea 

si is to save time — the time that 

J would be expended in raising 



£3 $599 



P05TUR6PE0IC 



Sealy Sofabed 

including 

the 

Sealy 

Posturepedic Mattress. 




as shown, full size 66" 

Reg. $950 

In stock for immediate delivery 

Area's Largest Sofabed and Sofa Specialist. 

Ilad&au Jrnteriord 

162 Nassau St. • Princeton • 924-2561 
Mon-Fri 9-5:30: Thurs 'til 8: Sat 'til 5 



each item separately and 
voting on it individually. If a 
member of Committee feels an 
item warrants further discus- 
sion, she or he may ask to have 
that item removed from the 
consent agenda, and it is taken 
up separately. 

On Monday night's agenda, 
along with six requests for per- 
mission to have amplified mu- 
sic at wedding receptions at the 
Mountain Lakes Nature Pre- 
serve house and several en- 
dorsements of legislation pen- 
ding in the State Assembly, 
ate ^8?fi a s"Siai-f c; , re l. la t iflP 
other concerning the Griggs 
Farm financial review and the 
PBA contract. 

Committeewoman Phyllis 
Marchand asked for the agree- 
ment concerning the Griggs 
Farm financial review to be 
removed from the consent 
agenda, saying it was far too 
important a matter to be buried 
among all the others. The PBA 
contract and a resolution ap- 
parently setting salaries for po- 
lice based on the contract was 
left in and approved. 

The PBA contract gives po- 
lice officers salary increases of 
6.75 percent per year for two 
years. It also includes a new 
health insurance coverage plan 
that requires police officers 
and other Township employees 
to pay 20 percent of their med- 
ical bills, up to a certain limit. 

Salary increase for Chief 

A Township patrol officer 
starting out will earn $31,000 
this year and $36,212 in 1992, 
when the salary range for this 
level will be $33,092 to $44,569. 
Sergeants will receive a pay in- 
crease from $42,481 to $45,348 in 
1991 and $48,409 the following 
year. 

Under the separate salary 
resolution that was approved, 
Police Chief John Petrone will 
receive a 9.2 percent salary in- 
crease from $58,027 to $63,364, 
and the three lieutenants, who 
are also not covered by the 
PBA contract will also receive 
a salary increase, from $48,051 
to $51,294. 

Having the Griggs Farm 
financial review treated as a 
separate item did not preclude 
Committee from approving a 
professional services agree- 
ment with the accounting firm 
Withum Smith & Brown of 
Thanet Circle for a sum not to 
exceed $13,875. The firm, one of 
eight that applied for the job. 



will undertake a complete 
financial review of the Griggs 
Farm development over the 
next six weeks. 

Ms. Marchand raised ques- 
tions about the scope of the re- 
view, saying she was concern- 
ed that going through old 
policies would have a negative 
impact on the development just 
when sales are picking up. 
Representatives of the firm 
were there to comment, as was 

Continued on Ne*l Page 



The Susan Swartz Style 

CRITICALLY ACCLAIMED OUTDOOR 
SCENES COMPLIMENT ANY DECOR . . , 
OR MAKE A BEAUTIFUL GIFT 

' Original Watercolors from S I50. 

1 Limited Edition Prints, signed, 
numbered, remarqued and matted 
from $ 36. 

• Museum Quality Note Cards 

> Custom Framing and Mattirig, 
Unique Designer Accessories 



Susan Swartz Studios 

ONE PALMER SQUARE, PRINCETON 
4™ FLOOR SHOWROOM • (609) 681-4700 

HOURS, Tues, to Fri., II 'til 5 ot by afjp'i. 




Another reason to get 
Invisible Fencing: 

Every day, more and more dog owners like you are learning 
about the many benefits offered by Invisible Fencing: 



• Peace-Of-Mind 

• Aesthetics 

• Freedom 



• Effectiveness 

• Affordability 

• Versatility 



Ask your veterinarion about our unique dog containment 
systems Veterinarians nationwide recommend Invisible Fenang 
as o sole, effective way to keep your dog on your property. 
Call today with your everyday reasons to get Invisible 
Fencing. For you and your dog. . . everyday. 

<-», r The Invisible Fence Company 
Ifk of Princeton 




u<\-~ 



609-924-5225 




Update on Township Road Closings 

At the request of the contractor, Township Committee has 
agreed to extend the work hours for the reconstruction of 
Mercer Road between Quaker Road and Parkside Drive. 

The new hours will be from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. The contrac- 
tor had asked for an extension to 9 p.m., but Township Com- 
mittee thought it would be better to have construction noise 
end earlier in the evening for the benefit of the residents. 

Mercer Road will be open one way into town from 7 a.m. 
to 9 a.m. for the benefit of commuters and school traffic. 
It will be shut to all traffic from 9 to 4 and again from 
6 to 8. Between 4 and 6, it will be open to one lane of traffic 
going out of town. 

The Township Engineering Department and the Police 
Department will evaluate how well this system — with its 
extended hours, total shut down during non-commuting hours 
and one-way traffic for commuters — works between Quaker 
Bridge Road and Parkside Drive before deciding whether to 
allow the contractor to impose the same system from Quaker 
Road to Lover's Lane for the repaving of that portion of Mer- 
cer Road. 

Township Engineer Robert V. Kiser told Committee that 
all the underground work has been completed between 
Quaker Road and Lover's Lane, and the contractor is ready 
to do the surface reconstruction. The deadline for comple- 
tion of the entire project is June 21. 

Meanwhile, weather permitting, Province Line Road will 
be closed between Rosedale Road and Carson Road Monday, 
Tuesday and Wednesday of this week for repaving. The hours 
of closing will be 8:30 to 5 each day. The road was torn up 
to allow for a new water main and a new gas line. Repaving 
will be paid for by the utility companies. 



/ Designer Hand 

h — ft 

Uarpw Uill • I mttiri 



X-_i._ „r -j,_" T«.ii« witn what Mayor Woodbridge 
lopiCS OJ me town ca u. e d "a reluctant four votes" 
conii™.a rmm pag» 3 ( adopt the budget with a 74 

Laurence Glasberg, a member c ™ ( municipal lax rate, Town- 
ofthe mayor's ad hoc Tax and f'P 'f™!? Zr'J^Zt 
Finance Advisory Committee. , Pa » a ' e ^fl?™ 1 ?h° 
Unsatisfied, Ms Marchand £ b 'L ^H IJhlTrfid 
abstained from voting on the bu ^ el - and so they did. 
contract, which was approved , Four ordinance ^reductions 

by the oUier four members of '"%?<* ">. ra P' d order M The 
r rnita public hearing on each is Mon- 

Lommmee. day May g Qne se(s Township 

Other Business salaries, which this year do not 
In other business, Committee follow the PBA contract but 
held a public hearing on an were pegged at a 5 percent in- 
amendment to the 1991 Town- crease with some market ad- 
ship budget incorporating the justments for those whose sal- 
?420,092 the Township will re- aries have been determined 
ceive from the state as a re- through a salary survey to be 
distribution of funds from the below the area average. 
Quality Education Act for prop- 

j.^t. i*\»j«0liAf 3Jhe juru>nAmp.nt. 

serve for uncollected taxes in to raise $185,000 to pay '/or the 
the light of the downturn in the removal of underground fuel 
economy and the poorer rate storage tanks at the former Ti- 
the Township is experiencing in ger Garage off John Street and 
collecting taxes. the removal of soil into which 

Henry Frank of Valley Road the fuel leaked. A third 
urged Committee not to spend authorized the placing of the 
money on new things in order question of a consolidation 
to keep taxes down. There was study commission study on the 
discussion of whether to adopt ballot for the November 
the budget with the amendment general election, 
that night or to table it for an- The fourth ordinance is to 
other night. Township Mayor bring the parking regulations 
Richard Woodbridge, noting on Race Street in line with 
that the budget has to be 'hose on Birch and Leigh 
adopted by a four-member Avenues. It would prohibit 
plurality, said that three mem- parking on Wednesdays from 9 
bers (the Republicans) want a to 11 a.m. to permit street 
tax rate that is four cents above cleaning. Currently, alternate 
last year's while two (Demo- side of the street parking is the 
crats Godfrey and Marchand) rule on Race Street, and some 
favor a five cent tax increase to residents have requested the 
cushion the tax impact for next change. 
year ' —Barbara L. Johnson 

Leonard Godfrey, who is run- 

ning for re-election this year, want extra income? a temporary' 
decided to join the Republicans or parumne |ob may be the answer 
on this issue, even though he Read the Help Wanled ads in this issue 

has spoken repeatedly about 0| TOWN TOPICS tor a varied seiec- 
the "terrific" tax increase that "°" 0| °P<>° nun '<' es °P=n » v°" 
is expected for 1992. But even ~ 



Borough Road Update 

The Borough Engineering Department reports that the first 
stage of road reconstruction on Moore Street should be com- 
pleted Friday. The crews will then move to Vandeventer Av- 
enue on Monday morning, where they will remain about three 
weeks. 

For the rest of this week, Moore Street wUl be closed to 
through traffic. On Monday, and for approximately the next 
three weeks, Vandeventer will also be open only to local traf- 
fic. 

New Jersey Bell contractors are expected to complete their 
work in the Bayard Lane/Mercer Street area by the end of 
the week. On Friday, they will begin conduit work on Nas- 
sau Street heading toward Washington Road. 

Two lanes of traffic on Nassau Street are expected to be 
maintained. Slowdowns in the eastern direction are an- 
ticipated while the work continues. 

In addition, Public Service Electric 4 Gas wUl be doing 
sporadic work on sites along Nassau Street in advance of the 
street's repaving this summer. 

Public Service will also begin installing gas mains on Hodge 
Road between Elm Road and Library Place. There will be 
one-lane traffic through work sites. 



Designer Handbags.. .'\ 
at 

discounts 



GALETE HANDBAGS 

Mercer Mall • Lewrencevllle/, 



DID YOU KNOW? 

That We Clean Some of 
The Most Unusual Things? 




.«« 



FRENCH DRY CLEANING 

TULANE STREET PRINCETON, NJ06S4O 



AWNINGS 

Perfect for patios, decks, entrance ways, 

windows or greenhouses. 

Stay cool and save energy, too! 





*A 



All different styles & colors 
Manual & motorized 

COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL 
rv _,. Alt. Rt. 1 , Lawrenceville 

L^ 'Sis'SLuse where Alt. Rt. 1 & Rt. 1 split; j 

\W\ yttfB** Next door to Swiss Bakery ( 

882-6006 T " es - Fri 1 M r Thur "® 8; Sat IfKMonjvy App't '■ 



LJxunk ^>h 



ocv 



What is a Trunk Show? 

A Trunk Show enables our 

Customers to try on many samples 

not usually available to the public. 

The manufacturers bring with them a large selection 

of styles which can be ordered; some to measure. 

In order to transport this merchandise. 

It is packed in a "trunk. " 

YOUNG DESIGNERS TRUNK SHOW 

Summer and Fall Fashions 

Appearing in Person: 

Ku,i?iryri Dtarius 
Steven Stolman 
Alby & his lines 

jxiaau & c^ahviaau 






derrick's 



^>- — » — on y'loore 



Distinctive Clothing For Women 



9*lo 



Mon.-Sat. 10-6; . 
Thurs. 'til 9; Sun. 12-4 

6 Moore St. Princeton 
(609) 921-0338 



Topics of the Town 

Continued from Preceding Page 

New P.H.S. Principal 
To be Named Shortly 

The School Board was ex- 
pected to name the new prin- 
cipal of Princeton High School 
at its Tuesday, April 23, busi- 
ness meeting. 

There were more than 95 ap- 
plications for the post, which 
was vacated last June when 
John Sakala was moved to the 
Valley Road administration 
building. Mr. Sakala had serv- 
ed as high school principal for 
11 years. 

Early next week, the finalists 
will meet with staff, students, 
and parents. The two outside 
finalists, as well as any finalists 
from within the system, will 
meet with the School Board 
prior to the Tuesday meeting. 

PHS Assistant Principal 
Marylu Coviello has been ser- 
ving as interim principal this 
year, while the national search 
for a new principal was under 
way. 

At a recent budget hearing, 
School Board candidate Debbie 
Curtis questioned the hiring of 
an outside consulting firm to do 
the principal search. She said 
that if the personnel depart- 
ment couldn't do its own search 
for a principal, perhaps the 
District should switch to a part- 
time department. 



Sales Reported Strong 
For Griggs Farm Units 

"In March we had the best 
month we've ever had, since 
the very beginning, and things 
are still going strong." 

That's the good news about 
Griggs Farm from Bob 
Cawley, co-chair with Harriet 
Bryan of the Griggs Farm de- 
velopment for Princeton Com- 
munity Housing. The good 
news is affirmed by Joyce Har- 
rigan, in charge of Griggs 
Farm sales for Coldwell Bank- 
er - Schlott Realty, who reports 

Seven contracts of which four 

have closed. Three of these con- 
tracts were signed in April. 

"We're doing very well," Ms. 
% Harrigan says, speaking on the 
phone in between closings. 
"The traffic through here since 
March 1 has been the best ever. 
The market is picking up." She 
attributes the increase to better 
overall market conditions and 
to the price reduction that went 



Three Borough Stores Hit by Shoplifters 

The arrest of two women last week for shoplifting nearly 
$3,000 worth of women's clothing from three Borough stores 
stemmed from an overdue inspection sticker. 

Jerusha Brown, 40, and Dolores Davis, 47, both Jersey Ci- 
ty residents, have been charged with shoplifting at Talbots, 
42 Nassau Street; Merrick's, 6 Moore Street, and Nar- 
ragansett, 202 Nassau. Clothing valued at $2,374 was stolen 
from Merrick's. 

Both were also charged with receiving stolen property. 

Davis was later released but Brown was turned over to the 
Mountainside Police Department, which had issued a con- 
tempt of court warrant for her arrest. The two suspects are 
scheduled to appear in Borough court on Monday. 

The events which led to their arrest began at 4:30 last 
Wednesday afternoon when Ptl. Robert Currier noticed a 1975 
Chevrolet traveling on Nassau Street near Tulane with an 
overdue inspection sticker. After stopping the car, Ptl. Cur- 
rier learned the car was unregistered, had no insurance and 
the driver — Brown — had no license. As he was dealing with 
the motor vehicle violations, Ptl. Currier also observed a lot 
of clothing in the car, some of the items in plain view, all with 
original sales tags. As he continued to conduct his investiga- 
tion, the two occupants attempted to conceal the clothing in 
shopping bags, Capt. Peter Hanley reported. 

Further investigation revealed that the suspects had in 
their possession clothing items from the Burlington Coat Fac- 
tory in South Brunswick valued at $553. Included in the haul 
from Merrick's, which was not aware of any theft until con- 
tacted by police, was a dress jacket valued at $790, and three 
other dresses tagged at $560, $410 and $405. Clothing valued 
at $384 was taken from Talbots and $68 worth from Nar- 
ragansett. 

Police were given enough information from the victims, 
said Capt. Hanely, "to press all charges," including positive 
descriptions of the stolen property. 

All the clothing has been recovered and police, he said, are 
in the process of returning it to the stores. 



WALLFLOWERS 

A Corqjltte Home Design Center 

is moving to Kingston 

WATCH FOR OUR 

GRAND OPENING 

(609) 921-8174 



Tjedy Shcpard 

The sophisticated woman's 
specialty shop 

1 96 natsau it. 45 easl afton av»,. 
princ»ton. n.J. yafdley. pa. 

609-921 -06*2 215-493-1732 



alan royce 



20 Nassau St. Princeton 
924-1746 



into effect at the beginning of 
March. 

The base price for a two- 
bedroom townhouse is now 
$99,500, with $109,500 for a 
three-bedroom unit. The 
models are open Wednesday 
through Sunday from noon to 5. 

Although notice of the Uni- 
versity's willingness to extend 
its mortgage guarantee pro- 
gram for employees wanting to 
purchase units at Griggs Farm 
did not get circulated as soon as 
had been hoped, an open house 
for University personnel was 
held April 6 and 7 and attracted 
•"tprest. Mr. CawIpv save it ie 
too soon to tell whether the Uni- 
versity's extended mortgage 
guarantee program, for which 
two banks are willing to grant 
a loan on a two percent down 
payment, is stimulating sales 
among University personnel. 

Nonetheless the amount of 
traffic through the units and the 
number of signed contracts is 
gratifying. "Things are hum- 
ming, and we're extremely 



pleased," Mr. Cawley said. As 
the year began, Princeton 
Community Housing had 63 
nearly completed townhouse 
units to sell. That number is 
now down to 52, he says. 

Ms. Harrigan is not at all sur- 
prised. "It's a product that is a 
very good one," she says. 

— Barbara L. Johnson 



WHO KNOWS what's going on in 
Pfincelon? People who read TOWN 
TOPICS, o! course. 



Spring Cleaning 

SPECIAL 



MAYFLOWER CLEANERS 

SS STATE ROAD, PRINCETON, NJ 

609-924-5144 

(Route 206; U mile North of Princeton Township 

Police Station; Next to Krauszer's) 

EASY IN-AND-OUT . FREE PARKING 



Any 4 or more items 

DRY CLEANED 

2 A 0/ OFF reg. price 
^^ * ^* Exit ires 1/7/OI 



Expires 5/7/91 



Tailor on Premises 
Down & Ski Wear • Suedes & Leathers 

Wedding Gowns Preserved 
Drapes • Blankets • Household Items 

In a Hurry? 

Ask for same day service & express 

drop-off! 

OPEN 7 DAYS 



DISCOVER 
BIRKENSTOCK 

SPRING SALE 

10-40% Off 
ALL BIRKENSTOCK SANDALS 

THRU APRIL 24th 

(10% off on special orders) 




Discover how healthy and comfortable your feet can be 
In original Birkenstock footwear. And discover the fresh | 
new look of B.rkenstock - sandals and shoes in exatmg | 
new colors and styles. 

WE CAN HAVE YOUR USED BIRKENSTOCKS 
RESOLED AND REPAIRED 



Birkenstock j 



FOOT PRINTS 

ARRIVES!! 

Monday, April 22nd 



LADIES SHOES 





Princeton Forrestal Village 

Rt. 1 & College Rd. 

Princeton, NJ • (609) 520-9899 



A PAIR 

Choose From Over 5,000 Pairs 



MONTGOMERY SHOPPING CENTER 

ROUTE 206 & 518 
Montgomery Shopping Center, Rocky Hill, NJ 



.gam i-iow rl3uc.nU Dilihii mibI-wio I 



• Topics of the Town 

S Continued Iront Page 5 

K - Student's Neck Grabbed; 
j Police Charge Visitor 

5 A Russian visitor associated 
< with the State Theater Institute 
> in Moscow has been charged by 
2 Township police with the assault 
gj last week of a 19-year-old 
z Princeton University student. 
S The suspect, Aleksei Zverev, 
$ 35, has a mental problem, and 
_, : thought the victim was associ- 
ated with the KGB, Lt. Samuel 
_- Bianco reported. He was sched- 
O uled to be heard in Township 
uj court this week but police do 
2 not expect him to appear. 




tained. While waiting for the 
police to arrive, the youths ran 
out of the store, leaving behind 
both pairs of shorts. 

A customer saw a heavy-set 
black male go behind a count- 
er in a Borough toy store last 
week and grab some Game Boy 
computer cartridges. Police 
said they are worth $145.75. 

Another theft victim is a Uni- 
versity student who left her 
bookbag unattended in Fire- 
stone Library. It was taken; in- 
side was the victim's wallet 
containing $30. 




ROBBERY SUSPECT: This la a 



A Snowden Lane resident in 
the Township lost her pocket- 
book on Friday to a quick- 

L >;■■;'. ■"■' :■'"■ ,-.«c^ *-*..«» £&$%%^ZX 

g student was running on Alex- WMpKt m tha April 8 caah box rf from ^ s ^^ store 

ft jnderStree around 4 p.m. robbary at Tha Braaa Horn, 74 , her car After lacing ner 

o Thursday. When she got in witnarapoon Straat. Tha alx- bundles inside, she noticed that 

z front of 126 Alexander, she was t0 ot, black male auapact In hla her pocketbook was missing 

J grabbed around the neck by m(d . 20 , w „ ,„, „,„ w „ring from the cart. She lost $30 and 

g Zverev A doctor from Yardley, . ^m^n o, Wt „,,„ and llgM her checkbook 

Pa., who was passing in a car „ An „„„ | nform „| 0n 

saw the incident, stopped and thou|<j c<|| ^ po|| „ „ 



A removable AM/FM cas- 
sette radio was stolen from the 

924-4141. dash of a car while it was park- 

,,,,■-,, ed Sunday in Lot 6 near Baker 

^ C : 0nds . l ?.! er 'A e ."?.. J ". ..^i Alexander Street were entered Rink on the University campus. 



went to the aid of the crying 
student, who had broken away. 



at several hundred dollars. 
8 Bikes and a Wheel Stolen 

Eight bicycles and a rear 
wheel were reported stolen in 



University proctor David during the weekend and rifled. Po , ice repor , a window had 
Wdbiir and the two detained the According to Lt. Samuel been broken to enter the car. 
suspect until the arrival of Ptl. Bianc0| cab i n ets and desk which is owned by a Princeton 

21 .J" 1 ?' . u . a drawers were P ried "Pe" P lus Junction resident. They 

pe student was not hurt and a smalli unlocked safe in one of estimated the value of the radio 
did not know her assailant, tne offices. A small amount of 
who, police said, could speak money was taken. 
very little English. Fortunate- It app ears that force was us- 
ly, the doctor who stopped, e d to enter the main lobby, Lt. 
could speak Russian, Lt. Bian- Bianco said. One entry was dis- 
co said. covered Sunday. The other was "re Borough last week. 

Bail for Zverev, who was not discovered until the follow- Their value ranged from a 
staying at the Nassau Inn, was j n g ^v n. Bianco reported, $560 Cannondale mountain bike 
set at $500 with a ten percent because' "police did not have taken from Tiger Inn — where 
cash option. He was taken by access to the complete build- it had been locked to a pole — 
police to the Helene Fuld Hos- j n g." There were pry marks on to an old 3-speed bike valued at 
pital in Trenton for an evalua- the doors to both offices he $20. The latter was left unlock- 
tion by the hospital's Outreach said ed in front of Green Hall. All of 

Program. Police said this week the victims were students. 

that they had heard, unofficial- 

ly, that Zverev, still under the Two Juveniles Thwarted A j^, concord Trailmaster, 
control of the Russians, had l n Shoplifting Attempt locked, was taken from the 
been sent back to Russia on TwQ ^ abml( 16 Graduate College and a Trek 

Saturday. . en k red the Great lm mountain bike valued at $350 

sions store on Nassau Street *?* ^ken overnight from a 
Two Offices Entered Sunday afternoon and were bike rack^Fnck^Chemica. 
_On_Alexander Street 't^r^IcVs^bserv- .TherearwheelofaSpecializ- 



other on the sixth floor in a with two pairs and come out 
building in the 300 block of with one. The youths were de- 



ConllnuBd on Next Page 




Is Body Tension 
Affecting Your 
Job Performance'! 

Let Our Trained Massage Therapist 
He^You_Rela_x_and Relieve the Tension! 

SAVE 5 10 The Princeton Massage 

I Group has been serving 
! Mercer County for more 



I 



with this coupon 

on a 1 hour 

therapeutic massage. 

SAVE $ 5 

on a Vz hour massage. 

M We are available 7 days 

PRINCETON | a week and offer free use 



jthan 10 years at the 
I Princeton Fitness Center. 

I 



4Hfcp 

Expires June 30, 1991 



1 01 whirlpool, sauna and 
I shower with your massage. 



Your Well Being Is Important! 

Call 609-921-6985 Today 

and schedule an appointment. 

Princeton Shopping Center • North Harrison Street • Princeton, NJ 



v^&rf* Xuttmanns 

Luttmann's and Your Graduate 
Perfect Together 

An 87 year old tradition 
in graduation gifts 



Select from 
over 400 

fine quality 
leather 
attache 

and business 
cases. 



Initals embossed in 23K gold free of charge. 

Hours: Mon-Sat 10-6; Friday Evening 7-9 
20 Witherspoon Street • Princeton, NJ 08542 • 609-924-0004 





\ 



V 




LOOK FOR OUR SPRING 
WAREHOUSE OUTLET TENT SALE 
JUNE 6th - 9th 



FIELDCREST 

"ROYAL VELVET" 

TOWELS 

100% cotton plush, thick & thirsty 
bath towels, hand towels & wash 
cloths. Classic looks for your bath 
decor, soft absorbency for you. Sil- 
ver, peach, mint, buttercup, slate 
blue, champagne, white, black. 
Bath towel reg. '16 SALE '10.99 
Hand towel reg. '12 SALE ^7.99 
Finger tip reg. '4.99 SALE '3.99 
Wash cloth reg. '4.99 SALE '3.99 
Bath mat reg. '21.99 SALE '16.99 
Bath sheet reg. '28.99 SALE '23.99 








FIELDCREST 

"ROYAL VELVET" 

BATH RUGS 

$ 6.99 - 24.99 

Luxuriously thick 100% DuPont 
nylon pile rugs with slip resistant 
latex backing. All solid colors, co- 
ordinated to "Royal Velvet" bath 
towels. Lid Cover, Contour Rug, 
24x36 & 27&48. Reg. $8-$30. 



mMM 

S Quaker Curtain 



Benla Linen 

Deptford Mall 

Dcptfoid, NJ 08096 

(609)845-1111 



Royal Home 

Forrestal Village 

Princeton, NJ 08540 

J609) 520-1243 



Quaker Bridge MaU 

Lawrenceville, NJ 08648 

(609) 799-4474 

Oxford Valley Mall 

Langhome, PA 19047 

3.15)752-1860 



, 



TRENTON 
ROUNDUP 



Smokers' Rights 

Legislation that would fine employers up to $5,000 and make 
them subject to potential lawsuits if they discriminate in hir- 
ing or firing employees based on their smoking habits off the 
job has been approved by the State Assembly. 

The revamped "smokers' rights" bill received Assembly 
approval ten weeks after Gov. Jim Florio vetoed the original 
smokers' rights legislation. This would have made smoking 
away from work a civil right. At the time of the veto, the 
Governor said the bill "trivialized" other civil rights. 

The compromise bill will be sent to the Senate Labor, In- 
dustry and Professions Committee for a hearing next week. 

Backhauling Banned 

The State Assembly has approved a bill prohibiting 
"backhauling." This makes it illegal for truckers who 
transport food to haul garbage on the return trip. 

The measure will now go to Gov. Florio for his considera- 
tion. 

Job Security for the Disabled 

The State Assembly has approved a measure that would 
guarantee job security to the temporarily disabled. The bill 
requires employers to provide temporary medical leave of 
not more than 20 work weeks during any 12-month period to 
any worker suffering from illness or disability. 

Battery Recycling 

Gov. Jim Florio has signed into law legislation that makes 
it mandatory for sellers or distributors of lead-acid batteries 
to accept discards for recycling. The measure also prohibits 
garbage haulers, landfills and incinerators from accepting 
the batteries for disposal. 

Candidates File 

Last week's filing deadline saw a rush of candidates for 
the 15th Legislative District, of which Princeton is a part. 
Filing for State Senate were Richard Krajewski, Lawrence, 
Democrat; Gerald R. Stockman, Trenton, Democrat; and 
Dick La Rossa, Trenton, Republican. 

Filing for the Assembly were John Hartmann, Princeton 
Junction, Republican; Robert Gunderman, Princeton, In- 
dependent; Steven Schlossstein, Princeton, Independent; 
Dallas Dixon, Trenton, Democrat; John S. Watson, Ewing, 
Democrat; Gerard S. Naples, Trenton, Democrat; W. Oliver 
Leggett, Trenton, Independent; and Rose M. Silva, Trenton, 
Independent. 




Topics of the Town 

Conlinued from Page o 

while the bike was locked over- 
night to a meter pole in front of 
205 Nassau Street. The wheel is 
valued at $100. 

Other bikes were taken from 
outside Walker Hall, from the 
third entry of Patton Hall, from 
the Elm Club — all unlocked - 
and from the Computer Science 
Building on Olden Street. The 
latter, a 12-speed Royce model, 
had been locked to itself. 

Township police report that a 
thief stole a girl's 10-speed 



Schwinn bike from the John 
'Witherspoon School grounds, 

whoro it had h*mn fhainoA *~ « 

bike rack. The thief took the 
bike, leaving behind the chain- 
ed front wheel. 

Fire In Masonry Planter; 
Propane Cylinder Inside 

What set a suspicious fire 
Friday in a masonry planter on 
Hulfish Street apart from an or- 
dinary minor fire was the add- 
ed presence of a small propane 
cylinder. 

At the same time police were 

Continued on Page 9 



Princeton Public Library 



Open for business 
and pleasure. 



Le (Petit Ma?(im 

the. 'European 'Party Creators 
Specializing in very fine gourmet cuisine 
+ Complete Party Service Available 
+ Five Star Chef Dominique Ponton 

215-785-2701 



r CARROLL & COMPANY 

fa- TREE EXPERTS — 

Iff Pining • topping • cabling 
hedge trimming • tree removal 

Free Estimates • Fully Insured 

924-9269 




KlTCHENAlD 

AT THE 
LOWEST PRICES 
. — EVERYDAY — 

Mrs. G Sells High Quality KlTCHENAlD Appliances At The Lowest Prices 
Everyday. Now — Save Even More With Factory Direct Cash Back Allowances 
On Selected KlTCHENAlD Appliances. Now Is The Time To Buy. 

SH0PAROOHO -COME TO MRS B'S TO BUT! 

OFFER EXPIRES 4/30/91 



STEP UP TO 

KltchenAld 

A _ ^ CASH BACK 

S Ji fl DIRECT FROM 

V fcl|| KlTCHENAlD 

'**C1.0THES WASKffl 



700/800 SERIES 




Whisper Quiet™ operation 
TriDura* porcelain inner wash 
basket 



Sure Clean™ selt cleaning lint filter 



STEP UP TO 
KltchenAld 



$ 



25 



CASH BACK 
BIRECT FROM 
KlTCHENAlD 

DISHWASHER 




STEP UP TO 
KltchenAld 



Quiet Scrub™ sound insulation 
Trtdura* porcelain on sieel lank 
and inner door 

Vi HP Gold Seal reversing motor 

■ Sure Clean water_heating system 

China Guard protection 



step up TO 



Kit. 



ki«r 



*50 

CASH BACK 
DIRECT FROM KlTCHENAlD 

GLASS SURFACE 
C00KT0PS 

PURCHASED WITH A 
KlTCHENAlD BUILT-IN OVEN 





STEP UP TO 
KltchenAld' 

'50 

CASH BACK 
DIRECT FROM KlTCHENAlD 

REFRIGERATOR 



TotaJ easy -clean design 
Four sealed gas burners or four 
even heat cast Iron electric 
elements 

Push-To-Turn infinite-heat controls 
• Strong; Durable tempered glass 
surface available in white, black 




KTRI18K 
KTRS22K 
Top-Freezer 

Refrigerator* Features: 

• Color coordinated white or almond 

cabinet 
. Adjustable Crystal Frost tempered 

glass shelves 
. 4 adjustable door bins, large 

enough (or gallon containers 

Adjustable meat utility drawer 




KUDM220 

TriDura* porcelain on steel tank 
and Inner door 
• Vt HP GoW Seal reversing motor 
• 4" way Kyaro-sweep""'wasn arm 



STEP UP TO 

MOO 

CASH BACK 
DIRECT FROM KlTCHENAlD 

REFRIGERATOR 



~ 



Slde-By-Slde 
Refrigerator* Features: 

• Thru- the- door crushed or crescent 
Ice and water dispenser. 

. Adjustable Slide 'N' Lock door bins 
large enough (or gallon containers 

• Adjustable Crystal Frost tempered 
glass shelves 

• Temperature • controlled Winter 
Chill 1 " Meat Locker 
Can dispenser 



surface available in white, dock • ftq|usraow"ioam."»T „..,..,.. j j 

iiiltWLLS KlT CHEHftlD FOR LESS! 

- .. . „.,.• « Mo/or Annllanr.es and Console TV'S 



ROUTE 1 (NORTH) at Bakers Basin/Franklin Corner Rd. 



fJ^^TffT^^rHTdToHBootr, • From RT. 95/295 Exit RT 
located 1 1/2 mi. South of Quaker Bridge Mall 

LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ 08648 

—.A a *tr\*\ M A A A nocw 




609-882-1444 



iJMIIIinMSBk *&msm 



OPEN 
MON-FRI9AM-9PM 
SAT 9 AM-6 PM 
SUN 11 AM-4PM 



uiinra ■ i» 




$1500 INSTANT CREDIT 
TO QUALIFIED BUYERS 



*>*r vw * nw t> r« * *v r t ' 'r i m *: **>V'-f,-r.-s^. 



MMMHwawnrr.' 




Jane Gregory oliver Houghton 

„ . _ . .. education from Rutgers Uni- 

Borough Republicans versity 

Name Three Candidates 

Three Republican candidates Ms Arle ". a formel : home 
for Borough Council last week economics teacher in the 
filed for the November election. Princeton Regional Schools, is 
They will fill out the ticket vi <* chairwoman of the Bor- 
headed by Richard Strazza, ough Republicaan County Com- 
who will challenge Democratic mittee and vice president of the 
Mayor Marvin Reed. The three Republican Association of 
Republican hopefuls will face Princeton. A resident of 17 
Council Democratic incum- Madison Street, she is widow- 
bents Lucy Mackenzie, Mark ed and has two grown children. 
Freda, and David Goldfarb. Ms. Gregory, who lives at 32 

Yolan Arlett, 52, will run for Cameron Court, holds a B.A. 
the two-year term on Council '">m Skidmore College. She is 
now held by David Goldfarb. a client representative for 
Mr. Goldfarb was appointed D 'g ltal Solutions, Inc. 



last November to fill Mr. 
Reed's seat after Mr. Reed was 
named Mayor. 

Oliver Houghton, 70, and 
Jane Gregory, 52, will run for 
the two three-year Council 
terms. Their Democratic op- 
ponents are incumbents Mark 
Freda and Lucy Mackenzie. 

Ms. Arlett will make her sec- 
ond bid for a Council seat, hav- 
ing lost in last year's election. 
She is a broker/salesperson 
with Weichert Realtors who 
holds a B.S. from Douglass Col- 
lege and a master's degree in 



East 
Brunswick. A Republican com- 



Coffee and Candidates 

A coffee featuring Prince- 
ton Township candidates for 
the Board of Education will 
be held Monday at 8 p.m. in 
the John Witherspoon Mid- 
dle School library. The can- 
didates are William H. 
Cherry, Ann Baynes Coiro, 
and Richard Kouzes. 

The event is sponsored by 
the Princeton Regional 
Schools Special Education 
PTO. It is open to everyone. 



Yolan Arlett 



mitteewoman, she has three [ 
grown children and serves as 
secretary to the board of direc- 
tors of the Junior League in I 
Harrisburg, Pa. 

Mr. Houghton, 147 Wilson 
Road, is a retired area building 
contractor and professional , 
engineer. A graduate of Prince- 
ton High School, he holds a B.S. 
in civil engineering from 
Syracuse University. 

A member of the Borough 
Building Appeals Board for ten 
years, he has also served on the 
Zoning Board of Adjustment 
and Rent Control Board. 

He is married and has two 
grown children. 



In response to our patients 1 needs 

The 
Princeton 
Pharmacy 

now provides 

FREE DELIVERY 

Prescriptions can be transferred 
from any location or we can call your physician. 

Call 

924-4545 

for more information 

The Princeton Pharmacy 

at the Princeton University Store 

36 University Place • Lower Level 



Open 9 am to 5:30 pm, Monday thru Saturday • 9am to 8:30 pm, Thursday 
VISA • MasterCard • AmEx • U-Store Charge • and of course cash. 



Creative Hydroponics 

Live, beautiful, exotic plants & trees! 

• Kentia palms • Hibiscus trees 

• Unusual cacti • Lowllght trees 

• Braided flcus • Home & office design 

Towne Center, 411 Rt. 206, Hillsborough, N.J: 

(Behind Dunkln Donuts) only S miles north of Princeton 

(201) 359-7171 



\DID YOU KNOW...? 



THAT WE DISCOUNT 
ALL MAJOR BRANDS 




Swim in sparkling 
CHLORINE-FREF water. 

TARN-PURE® ionization systems 
purify your pool without chemicals 
leaving it clean, clear and safe enough to 
drink. TARN-PURE® is the only 
system re cognized by the Centers for 
Disease Control and the NSF it has 
proven effective in applications from hot 
tubs to the Olympic Trial facility. 

Save your skin. Save your money. 
Get a TARN-PURE® system. For more 
information, please contact: 

Mount Rose Water Co. 

(609) 924-4489 
Box 1258 , Princeton, N.J. 08542 




LEES • Qj^roMmv • BkjelOW 



Call Us For A Quote 



Now Featuring Vinyl Floors by 
CongoleUflY and 



0000000 



40% -60% 

OFF 

Area Rugs 



CUSTOM DESIGN 

SAVINGS 

We can make... 
this rug... 
or this... 
or anything you desire! 

A border design, floral, dy- 
namic geometric, even 
your name! Anything's pos- 
sible at our one-of-a-kind 
custom area rug depart- 
ment. Visit us this week 
while our reduced carpet 
prices make your desire 
more affordable than ever. 
Now available in STAIN- 
FIGHTER Carpet. 




PRINCETON 

"at— North Harri son Street 



uFWTri 



rtn 



(609) 683-9333 



PR INCETON, 



SINCE 1889 



Vtmf- 



STORE HOURS: 

Mon.Tues, Wed, Fri. 10-6; 

Thurs. 10-8; Sat. 10-5; 

Sun day 12-5 




The U-Store Celebrates Princeton University Press Week: 



Books by Princeton Authors 

from 



GATHERING DAFFODILS for the club's French 
Market are children of members of the Garden Club 
of Princeton. They are, from left, seated, Jesse Taft, 
Phoebe Stockman, Alexandra Taft, and Lowell 
Olcott; standing, Lily Stockman, Gretchen Sword, 
Hope Sword, and Diana Taft. Located at the corner 
of Nassau Street and University Place, the market will 
open Friday and continue each Friday from 8 a.m. to 
11 a.m. through June 7. A special Mother's Day 
market on May 10 will run until noon. An abundance 
of unusual fresh flowers will be available. 



Topics of the Town 

Continued from Page 7 

receiving a call reporting the 
fire at 6:30, Ptl. Joseph 
Wilhelm, on foot patrol near 
Palmer Square and Hulfish, 
saw the fire and scooped up 
handfuls of dirt to extinguish it. 
Capt. Peter Hanley reported 
that leaves and coffee cups in 
the planter had been set on fire. 
Fortunately, he said, the pro- 
pane cylinder did not ignite. 

Take Back the Night 
March and Rally Set 

The Women's Center and a 
coalition of other Princeton 
University organizations will 
hold the fifth annual Take- 
Back-the-Night March and Ral- 
ly on Saturday. 

The rally will begin at 8 p.m. 
in Firestone Plaza and will be 



Cleanup Clarification 

The Township Engineer's 
Office has issued a clarifica- 
tion of its earlier press re- 
lease on spring cleanup 
policies. 

Contractors and garden- 
ers are not permitted to 
dump at the Princeton land- 
fill on River Road. Only 

Towiialiip irauieiiu, die per- 
mitted to use the landfill 
after they have obtained a 
free permit from the Town- 
ship Clerk's office. Also, 
leaves will not be included 
in the Spring pickup; leaves 
will be collected in the Fall. 



followed by a march to various 
locations throughout the Uni 
versity. Free child care will be 
provided. 

Continued on Next Page 



STORM & SCREEN 
DOORS 

Practical • Affordable • Energy Efficient 




THE DOOR CENTER 

MOST COMPLETE DOOR AND WINDOW CENTER 

The Village Shopper 

Rt. 206 (Just North ot fit. 516) 

609-924-3884 

HOURS: Mon-Fri 9-5:30; Sat 11-4; Thurs Evenings by/ 




PRINCETON 
UNIVERSITY 



• 



CC1NI 
T0RANDO7 



The \gt-ofihe. 

Democratic 

Revolution 



April 14-20 is Princeton University Press 

Week at the U-Store. Take this 

opportunity to examine the full range 

of books on display, and' save 20% off 

the list price. A representative from 
the Press will be on hand Monday through 
Friday from 1 1 :00 to 2.00 to answer your 

questions and discuss recent 
Princeton University Press publications. 

William Ashehrook and Harold Powers. Puccini's Turan- 
dol: The End of ihc Great Tradlilon. 

David P. Bitlingion. The Tower and ihc Bridge; The New 
An of Structural Engineering. 

Claudia J. Brodsky. The Imposition of Form; Studies in Nar- 
rative Representation and Knowledge. 

Kent E. Calder. Crisis and Compensation: Public Policy 
Political Stability in Japan. 

Sebastian de Grazia. Machiavelti in Hell. 

Anthony Grafton. Forgers and Critics-. Creauvily and Duplicity 
in Western Scholarship. 

Judith Herrin, The Formaiion of Christendom. 

Edmund Keeley. The Salonika Bay Murder; Cold W, 

Politics and the Polk Affair. 

Alvin Kernah, Samuel Johnson and Ine impact 01 trim. 

William McGuire, Bollingen: An Adveniure in Collecting the 

Past. 

R.R. Palmer. The Age of the Democratic Revolution. (2 

vols.). 

Tony Rolhman. Science a la Mode; Physical Fashions and 

Fictions. 

Richard H. Ullman. Securing Europe. 

Nancy J Weiss. Whitney M. Young. Jr.. and the Struggle 

for Civil Rights. 

Robert Wuthnow. The Restructuring of American Religion. 

Theodore Ziolkowski. German Romanticism and lis In- 



Scb istiap iic i.. i.i". i 

Machiavelti 
in Hell 




THESR10I1IKH 
BRVmURDER 

COLE WAR POLITICS i 
AND TF€ POLK AFFAIR 



IV .\gt ..I i!t. . 

Democratic 
Revolution 




BOLLINGEN 



FORGERS 

AND 
l CRITICS 

CREATIVITY 

i AND 

1 DUPLICITY 

IN 

WESTERN 

SCI-iOARSHIP 

ANTHONY CHAFfON 



Science 
a la Mode 



PHYSICAL FASHONS 
ANDFOONS 





Save 20% 
This Week 



The titles shown represent just a few of the thousands of 
Princeton University Press books on display this week at the Princeton University Store 



Free Parking in our own tot 
Open your own U-Store account 
and charge instantly, or use 
VISA, MasterCard or AmEx 




t&te 



Open Mon.-Sat. 9:00-5:30 



36 University Place 
609-921-8500 



: Topics of the Town 

5 ConlmuwJ tfom P»0« 9 

"*- The march will kick off a sex- 

t ual harassment /assault aware- 

=! ness week. "The events will 

£ focus on stopping violence as 

* well as the rape culture that 
£ allows violence to persist, "said 
o Women's Center Director Janis 

2 Strout. 

z 

2 Other co-sponsors include the 

* SHARE Program, the Standing 
4 Committee on the Status of 
z Women, the Affirmative Action 
z Office, the Dean of Students, 
g and the Dean of the Chapel 
E Sponsoring student organiza- 
z tions include ONYX, Under- 
2 graduate Student Government, 
*" Princeton Student Action Coali- 
g tion.GALAP, the Class of 1991, 
a and the Graduate Student 
g Union. 

X To reserve child care or for 
$ more information on the march 
8 and rally or awareness week 
events, call 258-5565. 



Civil Rights Movement's 
Impact on Women Topic 

In conjunction with McCarter 
Theatre's production of Betsey 
Brown and Women's History 
Month, McCarter will host a 
day-long symposium "Coming 
of Age in the USA - The Voice 
of American Women and the 
Civil Rights Movement" on 
Saturday from 10 to 4. 

The symposium will explore 



Earth Day Festival Sunday 

Starting a compost pile and looking for alternatives to toxic 
household chemicals are just two of the subjects that m» be 
explored this weekend at the Whole Earth Center s Earth Day 
Festival. The event, which will highlight area env.ronjr.en- 
tal resources, will be held Sunday from 1 to 6 p.m. at min- 
ing Basin Park, Alexander Road. 

A number of tables, each devoted to a different environ- 
mental topic, will be set up. Stationed at each . w.l be 
representatives from groups whose purpose and activities 
relate to that topic. Among those scheduled to participate are 
the League of Women Voters, Farmer Ed (organic farming) , 
Teach Peace, Tom Tonnon (solar panels), Ahimsa (crueuy- 
free living), New Jersey Organic Farmer's Association Ca- 
nal Watch, Trash Troops, Professor Stephen Hubbell (for 
est preservation), the New Jersey Environmental Federa- 
tion, and the Princeton Environmental Commission. Repre- 
sentatives from Princeton High Schoo s Water Watch, 
Brightside, and Environmental Council will also be present. 

An Earth Day ceremony will be held al .2:30 It will include 
brief addresses by Borough and Township Mayors Marvm 
Reed and Dick Woodbridge and a representative from 
Princeton University. They will discuss plans to safeguard 
fh area's environmental future. Throughout the afternoon 
mere will be music, informal talks, and nature walfc toe* 
plore the history, flora, and fauna of the D&R Canal State 
Park. The Whole Earth Center will provide sandwiches, fruit, 

^Preceding the festival will be a canal clean-up sponsored 
by Sceton University's Environmental Action. Clean-up 
crews will assemble at the Washington Road entrance to the 
D&R Canal towpath and will depart each hour on the hour 
from 9 a.m. to noon. 



Sons were born to William Teresa's Pizza tc .Open 
and Donna Truppo of Mon- l n Chambers Walk Sate 

mouth Junction, Mark and Teresa > s pj zze tta and Caffe 
Geralyn Jiras of Hamilton, . schedu j e( i t0 open May 15 in 

William and Sharon McLuone ^ palmer square store for- 

The symposium will explore f West Windsor, Anthony and m . ^.^pjej by Chambers 
the impact that the Civil Rights Phyllis Ann Chismar of Plains- Wa]]( Cafe A branch of the piz- 
movement had on the work of boro, all on April 5; za shop on Nassau Street, it will 




movement L. — 

women writers in the United 
States. Panelists include play- 

Wrights Migdalia Cruz, Dr. Also to Lawrence and Lor. 

Endesha Ida Mae Holland and McGill of Lawrencev.lle 

Adrienne Kennedy; poets Toi Walter and Sharon Case of 

Derricote and Sonia Sanchez; Jamesburg both on April 7 

television writer Lore Kim- Scott and Elizabeth August of 

brough (The Cosby Show); Princeton, Charles and Maria 

essayist and critic Michele Stile of Princeton, both on April 

Wallace; Tiffany Patterson, 8; .',.„, 

visiting professor at Princeton Also to Michael and Darlene 

University and Emily Mann, Pallotti of Lawrenceville, 

Artistic Director of McCarter Charles and Cynthia Bregenzer 

Theatre of Hopewell, Scott and Jean 

Ricketts of Neshanic Station, 

-ia J KhftI"<Kfl i aftS^ioAte m \9 . J .°i!!!„S n( ?. ^?. d i ne ~ M ?. 1 l 1..'! f 

from panelists of their own Colleen Klock of Yardley, Pa., 

works, followed by a question Rick and Randy Thomas of 

and answer period. The after- Neshanic Station, Eric and 

noon session from 2 to 4 will in- Kimberly Bosley of Princeton, 

elude a slide presentation and Scott and Heidi Wiggs of 

discussion by the panelists on Merceville, all on April 10; 

how the Civil Rights movement Also to Robert and Susan 

shaped their lives and influenc- Kozic of Hightstown, Siddartha 

ed their writing. and Madhaui Sahi of Princeton, 
The symposium is open to the and Andrew and Sharon Unger 
public free of charge and will of Cranbury, all on April 11 



za shop on Nassau Street, it will 
offer salads, cappucino, espres- 

Contlnued on N«l Page 



HAIR CARE 
THAT'S BETTER 
THAN NATURAL 



In our salon you li 
nerience the legendary 
powers of herbal remedies 

and uplifting effects of 
Aromascience™ fragrance 
with Systeme Biolage 
by Matrix. You'll enjoy 
beautiful, healthy hair 
and eco-responsible 
packaging. 

Responsive Hair Care in 
Harmony With Your 
World. 




HAIR AND SKIN CARE 



y matrix 

;iNCABE ^^ 

HAiRDESIGN 

133 Washington Street 

Rocky Hill, N.J. 609-924-0600 



609-924-1200 



be sign-language interpreted 
for the hearing-impaired. For 
more information, call Char- 
lotte Hussey at 683-9100. 



Daughters were born to 
Mark and Nanette Kubian of 
Kendall Park, April 6; Ronald 
and Susan Marks of Yardley, 
More Boys Than Girls Pa, April 8; Russell and Maria 
r. a »» j- i #i 4 Ga ter of Kendall Park, Scott 

Born at Medical Center and Mary Demarest ofWash . 

In the week ending April 11, ington Crossing, both on April 
19 boys and five girls were born 10, and Christopher and Robin 
at Princeton Medical Center. Aiello of Somerville, April 11. 



Jg NEED BOXES? « 

m SHIPPING BOXES ig!S 

STORAGE BOXES I 

MOVING: BOXES ■ 

GIFT BOXES i 

I QUANTITY DISCOUNTS 1 

EXPERT | 

SHIPPING SERVICES Jj 

I „■ Call I 



Willi 

497-1323 

Down from Banana Republic 

on Palmer Square 

10 Hulfish St., Princeton 



rcrHr^r 



IT'S WORTH THE TRIP FROM ANYWHERE 

ebfcL SUSAN 

GEEENE 

HAS IT ALL! 




New Spring $4 A 

Genuine Leather | ^J 
Patchwork Handbags 



99 



Values to '42 



14K Gold Jewelry 
Bracelets • Rings • Earrings 

Vi Price 



ANNE KLEIN 

LEATHER 1/ p-j co 

WALLETS /2 "NCe 



Five Piece Verdi 
Luggage $( 




Reg. '300 



INTO FASHION 

For The Largest Selection of 

HANDBAGS 

FASHION JEWELRY 

LUGGAGE 

ATTACHES 

All at Low Discount Prices 

SUSAN GREENE 

SHOP & COMPARE, 
THE BEST PRICES AND SELECTION ARE HERE! 

NEW SPRING MERCHANDISE ARRIVING DAILY 

$L_______ t t 

'MARKETPIACE ^MARKKfPESEE 



PRINCETON 

Route 27 & 518 
297-6249 



MATAWAN 

Engtahtown Auction j?°i rt iL51 
(Brown Bldg.) 583-3690 



Outlet Store 



Ma* e ,p,ace Stores Daily 10 - 6; Thurs & Ffj . ,!, ™^ 5 



BAKER 

Pontiac-Buick 

"Nobody has cars 
like we do." 

Route 206 

Princeton, N.J. 

921-2222 




urmiure 



Fine Quality Home 

Furnishings at 
Substantial Savings 

75 Main St., Rt. 27 
Kingston, N.J. • 924-0147 

Mon-Fri 10-5; Sat 1<M; Ttiurs 'til 8 p.m. 





i Topics of the Town 

Continued from Preceding Page 

so, pastries, Italian cookies, 
' and individual pizza pies. It will 
not sell pizza by the slice. 

The Chambers Walk Cafe 
closed in January after failing 
to come to terms on a lease 
with the Collins Corporation, 
owners of Palmer Square. 

Earth Day Festival Set 
VAt Watershed Reserve 

The Stony Brook-Millstone 
Watershed Association will 
hold its Second Annual Earth- 
day Celebration on Saturday, 
April 27, at the Association's 
585-acre preserve on Titus Mill 
Road in Pennington. 

The day's events will include 
a 10-kilometer run, 10-kilo- 
meter race/walk, live music, 
exhibits and demonstrations, a 
barbeque, a bake contest, 
games of all kinds and a raffle. AT A RECENT RECEPTION held by Borough Mer- 
Activities begin at 9:30 with chants for Princeton were, from left, Ray Wadsworth, 
the registration for the 10- the group's president; Kevin Lanahan of Ricchards's; 
kilometer run and race walk, and Alice Miller of McCarter Theatre. 

Free T-shirts will be given to ■ 

the first 300 entrants, and win- °e part of the raffle as will a next turn has some powerful 
ners in eight different categor- seven-foot flowering tree from extra drama : it also happens to 
ies will share in $500 of prize Kale's Nursery, a collection of be the end of the second millen- 
money. The races will be held 10 perennials from Stony Brook nium. * 

Gardens and a bi-plane ride The meaning of this calen- 
donated by Harry Askew. drical bookend will be pondered 

and discussed at this year's 

Children are invited to enjoy Gauss colloquium at Princeton 

music of The Tone Rangers and the petting zoo while parents University on Friday and Sat- 

Borderline as well as dancing, are challenged to bring their urday. The title is "Thinking 

hayrides, and a photographic best baked goods for entry in About the End: Fin de Siecle 

exhibit at the Buttinger Nature the first annual Watershed and Apocalypse." The chief 

Center. Children and adults are Bake-Off. organizer of the colloquium is 

invited to participate in a vari- Admission to the Festival, Humanities Council Chair Vic- 

ety of non-competitive games which continues until 5 p.m., is tor Brombert, Henry Putnam 

which use objects as diverse as $3 for adults and $2 for children University Professor of Ro- 

a parachute and a giant six-foot with those under six admitted ma nce Languages and Litera- 

free. Rain date will be Sunday, tures and Comparative Litera- 

April 28. All proceeds benefit ture and director of the Gauss 

the Watershed Association. Seminars and Gauss colloquia. 



rain or shine. 

The Festival proper kicks off 
at noon and will feature the live 



earth ball. 

Area artist and woodworker 
Geoffrey Noden will be on 
hand, demonstrating the lost 
art of "Bodging" — the making 
of a chair from a tree 



New House 
Brand Liquors 



Scotch 

Vodka 

Gin 

Blend 

Rum 



1.75 

18.99 

11.99 

11.99 

12.99 

11.99 



Canadian 14.99 
Bourbon 14.99 




One of the speakers is 
one of End of Century Is Topic Jonathan Schell, a former New 
which will be included in the Qf Princeton Colloquium Yorker writer, one-time visit- 
raffle. A lithograph by Joan ing journalism professor at 
Atbeiter entitled A Summers , The ends of centuries have Princeton and the author of the 
Day, and framed by f 1 ™ 3 ^ fired human imagina- book The Fate of the Earth 
Queenstown Gallery, will also tlons - but the fast-approaching Ms0 speaking w j U be philoso- 
pher Richard Rorty, a former 
Princeton nrnfessor nnvjat (hp 
University oi Virginia ; Martin 

Jay, professor of history at the 
University of California- 
Berkeley and author of a 
number of books on radical 
German political and social 
theory; and Robert Adams, a 
literary critic and literary 
historian who has written on 
nihilism. 

Princeton English Professor 
Elaine Showalter will join the 
four in a concluding round- 
table discussion. 

The colloquium is open to the 
public and will be held in Betts 
Auditorium in the School of Ar- 
chitecture. Friday's session 
will feature Prof. Rorty and 
Mr. Adams and will begin at 
2:30. The Saturday session 
begins at 9:30. Prof. Jay and 
Mr. Schell will speak, with the 
round-table to follow at 2:30. 

May Market Scheduled 
For May 8 and May 9 

Stony Brook Garden Club's 
30th annual May Market will be 
held from 4 to 6 p.m. on 
Wednesday, May 8, and from 8 
a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday, May 

Continued on Next Page 




Liter 
10.99 
6.99 
6.99 
7.99 
6.99 
8.99 
8.99 



Beer 

Molson Gold, 12pk/case 

Heinken, 12pk/case 

Grolsch Swing Top, 2pk 



Wine Values 

Luiano Chianti '7.99 

Corvo White & Red 6.99 

Fetzer Sundial Chardonnay 7.99 

Santa Rita Cabernet 4.99 

Mondavi Chardonnay 13.99 

M.G. Vallejo Cabernet 5.49 

Bon Marches Chardonnay 8.99 

Martin Soret Vouvray 7.99 

Messias Garrafeira 78 7.99 

Lerradayres 3.99 

R.H. Phillips Night Harvest 

Cabernet, Mag 7.99 

R.H. Phillips Night Harvest 

Sauvignon Blanc, Mag 7.99 



'15.49 
.18.99 
. .2.99 



' Deli Hours: Mon-Sat 8-8:30; Sun 1(M:30 • Liquor Store Hours: Mon-Sat 9-9; Sun 10-5 



Princeton-Hightstown Road (1st I 



€llsworfh r s 



over the bridge from Princeton) 
(609) 799-0530 



Not responsible for typographical errors 
A. B. C. pricing prevails 



Adult Students Invited 

An Open House for adult 
students will be held at Mer- 
cer County Community Col- 
lege on Thursday, April 25, 
from 6 to 9 p.m. in the Stu- 
dent Center on the West 
Windsor campus, 1200 Old 
Trenton Road. 

Workshops will address 
career transitions, study 
skills, and juggling the roles 
of parent, worker and stu- 
dent. Representatives from 
various academic programs 
will be available to discuss 
course and program re- 
quirements. 

For more information call 
the Admissions Office at 586- 
0505. 



Classic 
Simplicity 



Missy 4-18 




■llfMakM 






INTERIORS 



AT URKEN 

For In Home 

Consultation/Walk Through 

Consists of Suggestions On: 

• Window Treatments 

• Wallpaper/Paint Color 

• Furniture Selections/ 
Arrangements 

• Complete Color Schemes 

• Lighting Suggestions 

• Accessories Placement/ 
Selection 

Fee $75.00 



Shopping Trips to 
New York or Philadelphia 

— Spend Day in Designer 
Showrooms Normally Open 
Only to the Trade 

— Make Selections First Hand 

— Exciting Up-to-the-Minute 
Home Fashions 

— Purchases on a Cost Plus 
Basis 

Fee $175.00 
Call Us For Details 

924-8334 

27 Witherspoon Street 
Princeton, N.J. 




7 Topics of the Town 

J Continued (rem Pag« II 
a 

■" 9, on the paved terrace behind 

t the Nassau Inn on Hulfish 

j Street. 

k Mrs. Eugene Haring heads 

< up this year's market, assisted 

>: by Mrs. Amos Eno. 

5 Parking spaces on Hulfish 

8 Street will be reserved for pick- ..: 
x ups, with deliveries to curbside. 
g Proceeds go toward Princeton 
J area projects and Rockingham. 

r - Clancy Volunteer Award 

o Recipients Are Named 

3 Dorothy Katz of Pennington, 

5 Judy Salcewicz of Lawrence- 

£ ville and Carin Algava of Ran- 

„- dall Road have been chosen by 

o the Princeton Area Council of 

§ Community Services as the PLANNING FOR 

1991 recipients of the Robert E 1fJ at scanticon are, from 



Service as a Volunteer. Ms. 
Algava will receive the special 
Youth Award. 

The awards, provided by 
Robert E. Clancy of Robert E 




Catering Creations 
(609) 275-5148 



] 



AN EVENING WITH PAT SCHROEDER, ,-. ~ "—. B a rbar a 

, l0 ,-„, ,, ,,nare from left, Barbara Straut, event co^chalrwoman.Da 

Clancy Awards for Outstanding i^?'^"^^ Parenthood board of trustees; ^^S^^XSi 
Service as a Volunteer. Ms. ™ or 8"" , J r ™_~2 . ■. ch„..H.r Princeton Un versltV Student. For more 



cZIK.oman;'and Jamie Schroeder, Princeton University . 
formation, call 599-3736. 



,,:..;.!„,„,„,, ,.|,v„onn, ,ic«rt Volunteer Council at ^^C^S'iytn^ 
every Friday at an elementary Princeton University. call ^S^'^'f^l 

Clancy Associates, will be pre- scho £, m ^^ and initiating m,. Langsdorf and Ms. Long Office at 58M800, extension i»i. 
sented to the recipients during numerous programs at the are also members of the board 

"'""'"'* YWCA. of directors of the Council of Nature Photographs 
Community Services. Qn Exhibit at Center 

ty Service Program at Notre Summer Arts Camp Watershed Association is 



National Volunteer Week at a 
luncheon on April 25. This year 
will mark the Uth consecutive 
year that the Council has 
singled out individuals who 



Thank a hard-working t)^ 
secretary during *fX\ 

Professional Secretaries 
Week 
, April 22-26 

We have 
chocolate 

Typewriters 

#One 

Computers 

Roses • VIP 

Floppy Disks 

Regular Assortments, Tool] 

Nassau St>^£ A* 




;ctj 



179 I 

Princeton 
924-7222 



have over an extended period 5 ame High School. For the Tl'""^' Annlications 
committed themselves to direct p^t u years she has overseen Accepting Applications 
the community service ac- Applications are now being 
tivities of thousands of accepted for Tomato Patch vis- 
students. She has also been a ual and performing arts work- 
Reassurance Contact Caller, shops for sixth through 12th 
telephoning an elderly home- graders. The summer work- 
bound person each day. She has shops are held on the West 
also worked with the Mental Windsor campus of Mercer 
Health Players. County Community College. 

In addition, Ms. Salcewicz Tomato Patchers select ei 



lea Cream 

M-Th & Sun: 11-11 
Fri & Sal 11-12 



Continued on Page 15 



41 



service to others through volun- 
teer efforts. 

Ms. Katz is known through- 
out the area, as one long-time 
co-worker stated, "for her 
ability to identify compelling 
need, to take personal respon- 
sibility for meeting that need, 

and to motivate others to join ha ' s " ^j^ry^ed the Trenton ther performing arts or visual 
with her. " g^p Kitchen, where more than arts as their major, and include 

Some 20 years ago, Ms. Katz 2 000 meals have been prepar- at least one non-major class in 
organized and still runs a sum- ^ and s^g,) to the needy, and their schedule. Classes include 
mer camp for young people she has arran g er ] tutoring and drawing, painting, 3-D design, 
from age six to 14 to enhance b for cn j 1(irerl j n ] oca l video, printmaking, computer 
their reading and writing skills. u hotels Sne has als0 
She has also spent many years ft s ia| 01 

working with groups of girls w °™* mzation 7n the plan- 
from the Training School at P* 5 * mittee o[ the Summer 



Skillman, teaching them to ^esTa'wTth the American 
Maff..,lhe_snack._bar at the " ■ . „ „ w ,h anVisnr 
counts. She has alsolrranged «a refular wee^y sclleSaie 
special events and holiday for a penod of ten years, 
celebrations at the school. 

Carin Algava, the recipient of 



art, acting, children's theatre, 
vocal ensemble, improvisation, 
musical theatre, jazz dance, 
costuming, and dance styles. 
Each session culminates in a 



Ms. Katz's other activities 



S^ h ^S?. f SSJS' "* Clancy Youth Award 



students at Princeton Univer 



Recreation Brochure 

The Recreation Depart- 
ment has mailed its 1991 ac- 
tivities brochure to all Bor- 
ough and Township resi- 
dents. 

The brochure outlines the 
Recreation Department's 
spring, summer, fall and 
winter activities. It includes 
information about the sum- 
mer day camp program, 
Community Park tennis 
programs, the Community 
Park pool schedule, men's 
and women's lacrosse, 
Lisarcize, Senior Trip Club 
information and a host of 
other activities. Look for 
your copy in the mail. For 
further information, call 
921-9480. 



student at Princeton High 
School. She has been a volun- 
teer for the Intergenerational 
Council of which she is current- 
ly president and a worker for 
the past year at Habitat for 
Humanity in Trenton, building 



in the college's Kelsey Theatre. 

A four-week session designed 
for ninth through 12th graders 
runs from June 24 through Ju- 
ly 18. The cost is $400 plus a $25 
application fee. Students in 
grades six through eight can 
enroll in the three-week session 
which runs from July 22 
through August 9. The three- 
week session costs $300 plus a 



homes for the needy. She also $25 application fee. A limited 
organizes singing groups who amount of funding, given on a 
perform, particularly at holi- first-come basis, is available to 



Your place 
or ours. 

Monday: Fish Sandwich & Fries 2. 9 

Tuesday: Fried Clams & Fries 2. 

UlsJiuwdajn fish & ChiDS . - - - 

Thursday: Neptune Salad Sandwich & Fries . . 
Friday: Crab Cake Sandwich & Fries . . .3." 
Saturday: Soft Shell Crab & Fries . . 4." 



2.99 

3." 



Terhune's Apples, Pies & Cider 
Fresh Game & Caviar 

256 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ (609) 921-0620-Mon-Fri 8:30-7:30; Sat 8:30-6 
15 minute courtesy parking In front of store, (we deliver, too.) 




"iw^ lT 



/ 



day times, at area nursing and 
convalescent homes 



eligible applicants. 
Classes will be taught by 
Judges for theClancy awards working professionals. Tomato 
Patch veteran Maureen West 
returns for her ninth season as 
artistic director. Other return- 
ing Tomato Patch staff include 
art teacher Pat Martin, video 
instructor Richard Johnson, 



this year were Ed Baumeister, 
editor of the Trenton Times; 
Connie Campbell, an active vol- 
unteer over a long period in 
many area organizations; 
Susan Kozo, director of volun- 
teer services at the Medical 
Center at Princeton; John 
Langsdorf, vice president of 
community relations at Church 
& Dwight; and Sherrill Long, 
assistant director of the Stu- 




and music instructor Richard 
Loatman. 

Applications are being sent to 
those who participated in last 
year's program. Anyone else 
who would like to apply, or who 



MAIN STREET 

Princeton's Distinguished Caterers 

Attention to Style 
Dedication to Quality 



Commitment to Service 

Catering available 7 days 

Call (609) 921-2777 
56 Main St., Kingston, NJ 





Apple Blossom Time 



Come walk through our 
orchards in bloom. 
Feed the farm animals. 
Eat crisp juicy apples. 
Full line of vegetables. 
Drink sweet country cider. 
Wonderful homemade 
baked goods: 

• Pies 

• Apple Crisp 

• Cookies 

• Fruit Breads 



Celebrate 

the beginning of Sprina 

with Us! 





Mon-Fri: 9-7 
Sat & Sun: 9-6 



VS 










«*■:*■■ * : :*-f^ra| 



ULTIMATE 

DOOR TO 

BEAUTY 

AND 

EXCELLENCE 




1/2 OFF EVERYTHING!! 



Dhurrie & Machine Made 60% Off 







mm 



@TB5 

(oriental rug center) 

Direct Importers of 
Finest Persian & Oriental Rugs 

ONCE AGAIN 

PTK 
INVITES YOU 
April 20 & 21 

THE PROCESS OF WEAVING ORIENTAL RVGS 

PTK Oriental Rug Center in Lawrenceville is presenting a show 
by their Master Weaver on how Oriental Rugs are woven and 
the differences in the many types of rugs available. Come see 
our "Master Weaver" weave fine rugs right before your eyes. 
View our film that clearly explains the process of making rugs, 
from dying yarn to the finished product. 



m 



m 



PLENTY OF FREE PARKING 

HOURS: 

9:30-8 Monday-Friday 
10-6 Saturday 
12-5 Sunday 




■■■ ■JniSOURCE Tg 

(oriental rug center J IraEtP 



FINANCIAL PLANNING AVAILABLE 
THE PROMISES MEREST FREE 



DEFERRED PAYMENTS 
FOR 3 MONTHS. 

WE BUY OR TRADE 

YOUR OLD RUGS 

APPRAISING. WASHING AND 

STORAGE ALSO AVAILABLE 



ThetLargest Direct Importers of the Finest Perslen and Oriental Rugs 
ALL MAJOR CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED 

2817 Brunswick Pike • (Alternate Route 1) • Lawrenceville, NJ • (609) 883-6666 

OTHER SHOWROOMS; MILBURN^ PARAMUS • LONGJSLAND_ .JAVERFORD, ^ ; '^fj^^. 



m 



^S^^Smw^S^mm!^^§M^MMMM 



m< 



Patrolman Ronald Wohlschlegel a Leader 
In Fund Raising for N.J. Special Olympics 



"It hooked me right there." 
When Borough Ptl. Ronald 
Wohlschlegel worked one on 
one with kids in the Special 
Winter Olympics at the Great 
Gorge this January, he was 
hooked, he said. "When you 
have hands-on contact with 
them it's something you want 
to continue doing." 

The eighth annual Law En- 
forcement Torch Run to raise 
money to support the New Jer- 
sey Special Olympics summer 
games will be held May 31. It 
costs $200,000 to run the games 
which will be held June 1-2 at 
Trenton State College. Another 
$23,000 is needed to rent the 
stadium for four days. 

"Without the money there 
would be no Special Olympics, ' ' 
says Ptl. Wohlschlegel simply 





Ptl. Ronald Wohlschlegel 
He is one in the forefront trying PrjnceU)n wiu compete In this 
to make sure enough money is , competition, reports Ptl. 
raised again this year. wohlschlegel. 

More than 1,000 law enforce- 

The Special Olympics is a ment officers, including those 
nonprofit organization that pro- from Princeton PBA 130 (Bor- 
vides sports training and °ugh, Township and Mont- 
athletic competition for gomery police departments) 
children and young adults will join on the 31st to carry 
throughout the state with men- torches A 'The Flam ' of Hope ) 
tal retardation. About 25 from over 500 miles and through 
_ more than 200 communities. 
One group from here will 
pick up a torch on Route 206 in 
Hillsborough; another group 
will meet a South Brunswick 
group of runners in Kingston. 
The two groups will meet at 
Borough Hall before the torch 
is carried on to Lawrence, Ew- 
ing and into the stadium for 
opening ceremonies at 7:30 
p.m. 

Last year, the Torch Run 
raised more than $200,000. Mon- 



Lewis Barber 

( O N ST R U I I I O N 

921-2658 



'Additions 
■ Renovation 
New Homes 



ey is raised through residents, 
clubs, organizations and busi- 
nesses financially supporting a 
torch runner. It's called Adopt- 
a-Cop. 

New Jersey is the most suc- 
cessful money raiser in the na- 
tion for Special Olympics, Ptl. 
Wohlschlegel reported. Unfor- 
tunately, Princeton's contribu- 
tion last year was underwhelm- 
ing. 

Asking for $100 

"We're asking the people of 
Princeton — the merchants, 
the residents, the banks, the 
real estate offices — to sponsor 
an officer in the Torch Run. 
We're asking for a minimum of 
$100," stated Ptl. Wohlschlegel, 
"but whatever anyone can af- 
ford will be great." He sug- 
gested families could join to- 
gether to contribute $100. 

Those who donate $5,000 will 
become a year-round sponsor 
and will receive an exact 
replica of the Special Olympics 
torch and a plaque. "No one 
has ever donated $5,000," com- 
mented Ptl. Wohlschlegel. 
Maybe this year. 

Checks or money orders on- 
ly (no cash or pledges in order 
to eliminate all billing costs) 
should be made out to Law En- 
forcement Torch Run for 
Special Olympics. Contributors 
from the Borough can reach 
Ptl. Wohlschlegel at 924-4141. 
"If I'm not there, I'll get back 
to them," he promises. Other 
donators can call their police 
departments in the Township 
or Montgomery. 



$~% town Shop 

\. 1AA M P. 



r 



! 



344 Nassau St. 
924-3687 

Let us assist you as you plan your wedding. 

We offer: Engraved Wedding Imitations 

by Down's of Baltimore 

A Bridal Registry for Fine China and Crystal 

Lovely Gifts for the couple's new home 

and 

for the bride and her attendants. 

See us for 

all your special occasions. 

Mon-Sat 10-6 

Visa & Mastercard accepted 



H On Site Free Parking 




Each participant in Special 
Olympics repeats this oath 
before competing: "Let me 
win. But if I cannot win, let me 
be brave in the attempt. " Says 
Ptl. Wohlschlegel, "We [thepo- 
licej believe there is a future 



and adults who participate in 
the sports competition pro- 
grams in our state. We look for- 
ward to your continued com- 
mitment." 

The New Jersey Law En- 
forcement Torch Run, inciden- 
tally, has grown from 40 of- 
ficers running through eight 
towns and raising $7,000 in 1984 
— the first year — to become 
one of the largest Torch Runs 
in the world. 

"Yes, it's a lot of hard work," 
admitted Ptl. Wohlschlegel. 
"But it's worth it." 



COUNTRY 
TILES 



Stockton, N.J. 

(3 miles north of 

New Hope) 

(609) 397-0330 



Westfield, N.J. 

439 Central Avenue 

(201) 232-9533 



Philadelphia, Pa. 

Manayunk 

4401 Main Street 

(215) 482-8440 



Baltimore, Md. 
801 Light Street 
(301) 685-1300 





The Finest Selection in the East 
Hand Painted Tile & Terra Cottas 

Closed Sunday - Monday 




Preview the Complete 
1992 Leather Collection^ 

YamaniofAmenca 




Briefcases, portfolios, agendas 
Save 1 5% on your prepaid order. 
Saturday, April 20th, Uam-4pm 

jay Friedman of Yamani 
will assist you. 



The International Pen Shop 



Hours: 

Mon-WedlO-7 
Thurs-FrilO-9 
Sat 10-7 Sun 12-5 



Where Executives . 



609-520-8780 



1 16StanhopeStreet 
Princeton Forrestal Village 




YOUR STYLE. 
YOUR COLOR. 
YOUR SIZE. 
LANDAU QUALITY. 
LANDAU SERVICE. 
LANDAU FIT. 

LANDAU WOMEN'S 
BUSINESS SUITS. 

For 36 years, Landau has been known for 
excellent value in women's business suitings. 
Come see our interesting selection in sizes 4 - 20, 
and you'll see why. 

(SO Shop Hours 

Monday - Saturday, 9:30 am - 5:30 pm. 
Closed Sundays. 



I 




I JJJLJ 



'A^2<^j<^- U6*tg~ 



' 14 Nassau Street 



Across from the University 
(609) 924-3494 



Princeton, NJ 



Topics of the Town 

Continued Irom Page 12 

holding its seventh annual 
Nature Photography Contest 
exhibit in the Buttinger Center 
Gallery. 

The winning photographs 
from the contest will be 
displayed this Saturday to 
Saturday, June 1. The exhibit 
includes both color and black- 
and-white photographs of 
wildlife and landscapes. 

An informal opening recep- 
tion is scheduled for Saturday 
at 1, which is free and open to 
the public. Refreshments are 
included. All are welcome to 
visit the Watershed's Buttinger 
Center Wednesday through Fri- 
day, 10 to 5, and Saturday, 10 to 
4. 

For further information, call 
the Buttinger Center at 737- 
7592. 

'Bremen Town Musicians' 
At Rocky Hill Library 

Creative Theatre, a profes- 
sional theatre for young au- 
diences will present The 
Bremen Town Musicians, an 
audience participation play 
adapted from the Grimm tale, 
on Saturday at 3 : 30 at the Mary 
Jacobs Library in Rocky. 
Hill. ' 

Suggested for families and 
children ages 4-8, it is the story 
of four aged animals, a dog, a 
donkey, a cat, and a rooster, 
who must make new lives for 
themselves after being kicked 
out by their masters. The four 
unlikely heroes need the assist- 
ance of the audience to discover 
that they are not useless. 

The production is adapted by 
Creative Theatre's Education 
Director Jean Prall, its acting 
company and Artistic Director 
Eloise Bruce for actors, pup- 
pets and masks. Music and 
lyrics are by composer Rita 
Asch, and the production is 
designed by Spiritree. 

Registration is required for 
this program, which is free and 
open to children ages 4 and up. 
For further information and to 
register, call the library at 924- 
7073. 




FORTY YEAR VETERAN: Dorothy Alexander, a 
Princeton native who has been employed at 
Princeton Medical Center for 40 years, Is presented 
with (lowers by Medical Center President Dennis W. 
Doody during the recent employee service award din- 
ner. A Princeton native, Mrs. Alexander has been 
employed in the hospital laundry since 1951 and has 
been with the Medical Center longer than any other 
female employee. She is also organist at First Bap- 
tist Church. 



In addition to such track and 
field events as the 200- and 400- something old or new io sell? Try a 
meter dash, the long jump and ^5 00 TOPICS dassilied ad Ca)l 



a Softball throw, the event will 
feature a mime company, 
cheerleaders, a cappella sing- 
ing groups, arts and crafts, and 
special children's athletic con- 
tests. 

The Mercer County athletes 
participating range in age from 
8 to 20. The Special Olympics 
were founded in 1968 to provide 
athletic training and competi- 
tion for the mentally retarded. 

The event rune from O a.m. bo 

3 : 30. It will be moved to Jadwin 
Gymnasium in the event of 
rain. 

Continued on Next Page 



O*' ooo 



tfQQ' - «0" 



nee, l?«8 



cJUaAk^ i . 




/ 



For that Super Secretary 

in your organization 

Secretary's.week begins Monday, April 22 

Just... 

Telephone your order... 

and we'll deliver... 

We wire the world/ 

(609)924-9340 

360 Nassau Street, Princeton 

Free Parking • Major Credit Cards • Corporate Account Service 



to« ..o.. oo o .>o>- 



• O-- *Z>0 o. ■•*.' -00< 



mark reed (mark red) n. 1. Antique furniture restoration 
firm. 2.a. Diversification of wood conservation services. 
b. Characterized by excellence, c. Architectural woodwork 
conservation and construction. d. New furniture 
commissions, i. Antiques available. (English orig.) 

IIP Farnsworlh Avenue • Boi'dentOWll • 609-298-0716 



Student Volunteers Stage 
Mercer Special Olympics 

Princeton University student 
volunteers will stage the fifth 
annual Mercer County Special 
Olympics Saturday in Palmer 
Stadium. 

More than 300 area athletes 
and 400 volunteers, including 
Princeton students and faculty 
members, as well as communi- 
ty members, are expected to 
participate. Staging the Special 
Olympics is organized by the 
Princeton University Student 
Volunteers Council, which is 
financing the event with $5,600 
it raised in a fund drive. 



Tea Dance for Seniors 

The Princeton University 
Class of 1994 invites all 
Princeton area senior 
citizens to an afternoon tea 
dance and reception. 

The dance will be held on 
Friday, May 3, from 4:30 to 
6:30 at the Student Center 
Rotunda between Nassau 
Hall and Firestone Library 
on the Princeton University 
campus. 

The Princeton Jazz En- 
semble will take a nostalgic 
trip back in time to the Big 
Band era and provide 
seniors with music they can 
dance to. Many freshmen 
will be in attendance, and 
are looking forward to the 
senior citizens showing 
them how it's done. 

Free transportation will 
be provided. Seniors can 
register for the dance and 
get more information on 
transportation by calling the 
Senior Resource Center at 
924-7108. Registration by 
May 1 is requested. 



To look & feel great this summer... 

You have to start doing something about it today! 



ONLY A 
FEW 
DAYS 

LEFT! 



At Gold's Gym, we've been helping people 
of all ages change their lives for the better 
while giving you lots 
of reasons to join. Reasons like our 
state-of-the-art equipment and our 
staff; a trained group of professionals 
offering the kind of personal 
service you'd expect. 

From fitness to weight manage- 
ment to managing the stress 
of a full life you'll find 
Gold's Gym to be the 
perfect addition to your life. 

Not only will you start to look 
and feel better at Gold's Gym, 
you'll enjoy some fantastic 
savings on joining our club. 
We have some very, very smart 
membership pricing now in effect... 
Call us for details or better yet, stop by 
and see us. We are probably minutes from 
your home or office. 



GOLD'S GYM 

STATE-OF-THE-ART TOTAL FITNESS 

COMPLEX 

201-329-8300 



»-» i%» 




Anniversary Sale 

$ 99 

Membership Fee 



FREE 

Trial Workout 

1st time customers only 
Must be 21 or older 



m B s 




OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 

Princeton Corporate Plaza, Route 1 South (Between Raymond and Ridge Roads) Conveniently located on Route 1 



7 Topics of the Town 



Continued from P«0» 15 

s 

IZ-Magda Bogin to Read 

j At the Arts Council 

£ Magda Bogin writer in resi- 

< dence at the City University of 

>■" New York and visiting scholar 

g at the Institute for Latin- 

H American and Iberian Studies 

z at Columbia University, will 

3 read from poetry in Spanish 

* and Catalan, and in English 

_, : translation, and discuss the art 

z of translation on Thursday, 

z - April 25, at the Arts Council. 

O The reading will begin at 8 

uj p.m. and will be followed by a 

g reception and book sale. A 

2 donation of $5 is suggested ($3 

••for students and senior for all visitors throughout the 

» citizens). ^ „,._ , „ 

S The Old Barracks Museum is 

O The presentation will feature a museum of the War for In- 

'Z the poems of mystic feminist dependence and life in Revolu- 

| poet Rosario Castellanos, tionary New Jersey. It is 

o whose work paved the way for located next to the New Jersey 

** _*i »»_..: m ~~ t n "stafp Hnucpnn Rarrapk Strppt 




Magda Bogin 



delinquency, Administrative 
Offices of Uie Courts. 

The morning sessions will 
begin with a slide presentation 
giving an overview of family 
violence, followed by a scenar- 
io by the Monmouth County 
Mental Health Player Interac- 
tive Theatre. 

Afternoon workshops titles 
are "Policing Domestic 
Violence," "Beyond the Best 
Interest of the Child: Custody 
Rights of the Abuser," "Spouse 
Abuse and Child Abuse," 
"Domestic Violence Law and 
the State Standard Operating 
Procedures," "Community 
Agencies Response to Domes- 
tic Violence," and "Under- 
standing the Abuser." 

The cost of the conference is 
$60 ($40 for students/abuse sur- 
vivors). Lunch and materials 
are included. A contribution of j 
$40 will sponsor a student or a 
survivor of abuse. 

For more information, or to 
receive a conference brochure, 
contact Womanspace, Inc., 1860 
Brunswick Avenue, Lawrence- 
ville, 08648, Attention: Legal 
Conference, 394-0136. 



Mm 




CPR, Lifeguard Training 



other Mexican women to State House on Barrack Street 

become writers. Also included and is open Tuesday through 

will be selections from the work Saturday from 1 1 to 5 and Sun- 

of Salvador Espriu, one of days from 1 to 5. 

Spain's greatest 20th-century For more information call 

poets. Ms. Bogin's recent 396-1776. 

translations of Espriu's poems 

from the Catalan marked his 

debut in the United States. Womanspace Sponsors 

wo^s 0n ^e agd Th B e 0gin Wom h e e n r Day °" ^^ VWAm ™ /TvSrtte'rttte YMCA 

Troubadours ; a translation of J- 't^^L^tZ^''^ The Princeton Family YMCA 

Isabel Allende's House of the ±ZZLT?tt$Ztrm will offer cardiopulmonary 

Spirits; and English adapta- *™ ^w .„ S?„ pi? resucitation and first aid in- 

tion of' Don Quixote, to be $£?£%*£&?„££ struction this spring along with 

published later this year ; and S'3™™, ,„ r r m 5 American Red Cross lifeguard 

; novel, Nataiya. God, *£^Z«%%%$£. training. Registration for these 

MeSSCnger mission in the Reagan ad- ^f^^f^Xuard 

ministration is told in her book, , Prerequisites tor meguara 
Old Barracks Museum Shattered Dreams, will speak traimng mclude being 15 years 

Plans Children's Dav at Womanspace's sixth annual 
flans Children s uay domestic violence , ega] con . 

The Old Barracks Museum in ference on May 1, at the Hyatt 
Trenton has planned special ac- Regency-Princeton, 
tivities with an American Womanspace, Inc., a non- 
Revolution theme for Child- profit organization for victims 
ren's Day this Saturday. Hours of domestic violence, will focus 
are 11 to 4. the all-day conference on eoor- 

In the spirit of Benjamin dinating services to better pro- 
Franklin, children can make vide intervention in the cycle of 
their own kites, or they can try f anu i y violence. There will be 
their hands at candle dipping, discussions on what happens 
Gaines like Blind Man's Bluff wnen a victim decides to enter 
populartTthe n'lS^wuTKf members of "he system 



^^SrSr^rTrfQhAtken Sharon: Architects, Princeton, have 
AWARD-WINNINGDES GN: Kehrt Shatkensn ^ ^^ ^ ^^ 

received an award for the design ot ■ ne ' , , he comrnercial architec 

tt^tt'&Ett^ "Designs oMheYear" com- 

petition. 



old, able to swim 500 yards con- 
tinuously, do a surface dive and 
bring a 10-pound brick to the 
surface, swim 15 yards under- 
water, and tread water. Cer- 
tification in first aid and CPR 
are also required. 

Financial aid is available for 
all YMCA memberships and 
programs. For more informa- 
tion call 497-YMCA. 



played on the Museum's his- 
toric Parade Ground. March- 
ing to the beat of an Workshop speakers will in- 
18th-century drill and listening elude Melanie Griffin, Commis- 
to stories of Continental sion on Sex Discrimination and 
soldiers' experiences in the the Statues; Assistant Pro- 
Revolutionary War are addi- secutor William Allan Zarling, 
tional activities, along with Mercer County Office of the 
demonstrations of musket fir- Prosecutor, Chief Francis Eib, 
ing and English country South River Police Depart- 
dances. ment; Courtney Esposito, Vic- 

tims Advocate; Bernard Hodg- 

In case of rain, the festivities don, clinical social worker 
will take place Sunday, April 21 Catholic Charities; Dan Mar- 

fromlto5.Admissionisasug- tinez, staff trainer Division of no " membe rs. For information 
gested donation of $2 for adults, Youth and Family Services- < ' - •'- 

$1 for seniors and students and Carol Williams, survivor- and 
50 cents for children under 12. Nancy Kessler, acting chief of 
The Museum will remain open domestic violence and juvenile 



The Stony Brook-Millstone 
Watershed Association will of- 
fer a lantern night hike for 
adults on Friday at 8. Par- 
ticipants will walk the Water- 
shed Reserve trails with 
lanterns to guide the way, en- 
countering owls, frogs and noc- 
turnal mammals. Meet at the 
Buttinger Center. 

Pre-registration is required, 
since enrollment is limited. The 
fee is $5 for members and $8 for 



Welcome Sprinj 
with 

Pansies (mixed or straight colors! 

Violas & Johnny-Jump-Ups 

(in packs, hanging gardens & planters) 

Jackson and Perkins ready-to-plant 

boxed roses have arrived! 
Starter Perennial Plants 

Including herbs: 3" pots s 2" 
10 pots/ s 20 over 35 varieties 

Pachysandra 
Ivy • Enonymous 

180-100 plants a crate 
""/crate; NOW: 16"/crate 
or more crates 15" 



Reg: 



18' 
50 



Remember your secretary 

with a blooming plant 

or a lovely flower arrangement 




V~* ( ' , o ft 



Mrjzur Nursery 

and Flower Shop 

"Growers o/ Quality Plants since 1932" 

587-9150 

265 Bakers Basin Road 
Mon-Fri: 9-6; Sat & Sun 9-4:30 



On Saturday, from 10 to noon, 
there will be a family program 
entitled "Exploring a Pond" 
for all ages. During a hike 
around the pond, participants 
will look for nesting geese and 
other springtime activity. Us- 
ing nets and seines, families 
will investigate the large and 
small creatures that inhabit the 
pond. 

Participants should wear old 
clothes and shoes that can get 
wet. The program is free, but 
pre-registration is required. 



Senior Citizens Directory 
Available upon Request 

The New Jersey Health Pro- 
ducts Council is offering a 
revised public service pamph- 
let, A New Jersey Directory 
for Senior Citizens, which lists 
more than 125 verified tele- 
phone numbers, including toll- 
free numbers, that provide a di- 
rect link for senior citizens to 
state and county agencies. 
These agencies offer helpful in- 
formation in solving financial, 
legal, health, and welfare prob^ 
lems. 

The directory is available 
upon request. Copies may be 
obtained by writing to the New 
Jersey Health Products Coun- 
cil, 2700 Route 22 East, Union 
07083. 



Spriijg 
Sei?satioijs! 

haircutting • styling • manicure 
pedicure* facials •make-up application 

• total make-om§ii certificates available • 







HAIR SALON 



46 E Broad St ,,„ _„ -^ . 
Hopewell, NJ 609*466 '4914 



/ 




THE MANY 

MOODS 
OF COUNTRY 

W)odMo<te 

fINE CU.STO M CABINETRV 
1^ 





/ V 



*«tesfe» 



3175 Route 27 
Franklin Park, NJ 08823 



8 mi. North of Princeton 




\ 



921-1111 

Fax: 821-1736 




Day Camp Registration 

The Recreation Department is accepting registration for 
the 1991 Summer Day Camp program. The Day Camp will 
be held at Community Park, Monday through Friday, June 
24 to August 2, from 9 to 3. The program is open to all Town- 
ship and Borough youths entering grades one through six as 
of September, 1991. 

The registration fee for the six-week program is $175 for 
the first child and $135 for each additional child. For those 
who need extended care for their children, a Pre-Camp Care 
program is available from 7 : 45 to 9 a.m. The fee for six weeks 
is $30 per child. 

Also available is an After-Camp Care program. The hours 
for the program have been extended and will be from 3 to 
5:30. The fee for six weeks is $60 per child. 

Those who desire formal swimming or diving instruction 
may register for the special instructional programs which 
are incorporated into the Day Camp schedule. Lessons will 
take place on Tuesdays and Thursdays for the entire six 
weeks. An individual may register for either program, but 
not both. The fee is $20 per child, per program. 

Campers will have the opportunity to take a supervised 
day-trip each week to an area attraction. There is an addi- 
tional fee for the trips. Trip information will be available with 
the registration package. The deadline for trip registration 
will be at a later date to allow time to decide which trip op- 
tion to register for. 

Registration forms are available in the Recreation Office, 
380 Witherspoon Street, and are accepted on a first-come, 
first-served basis. The deadline to register is June 1 or when 
the camp limit of 250 has been met, so early registration is 
advised. For additional information, call the Recreation Of- 
fice at 921-9480. 



As part of this project, 
NJDOT proposes to build a two- 
lane connector road from Scud- 
ders Mill Road to Princeton- 
Plainsboro Road at the 
Firmenich driveway. Traffic 
signals would be eliminated at 
Princeton-Plainsboro Road as 
well as at Scudders Mill Road, 
and access to Route 1 would be 
via the connector road to the 
Scudders Mill four -way inter- 
change. 

The Holiday Inn driveway 
from Route 1 would be closed 
and the exit and entrance 
would be from Mapleton Road. 
The concrete median barrier 
would be extended to prevent 
crossing Route 1 from Maple- 
ton to Plainsboro Road. Traffic 
signals would be provided at 
the intersections of the connec- 
tor road with Princeton-Plains- 
boro Road and with Scudders 
Mill Road. 

The DOT handout notes that 
"Various interchange concepts 
were studied prior to accep- 
tance of the current design. The 
others were eliminated due to 
environmental, technical 
and/or economic concerns." 
The estimated cost of this pro- 
ject, excluding right-of-way ac- 
quisition and engineering is $17 
million. Construction could 
begin in the fall of 1994 and is 
TopiCS Of the TOWII the . exls ' ln 8 ou * lde shoulders expect ed to take 18 months to 
c.n,,„ u8 d „o m p 896 ,e * n ? r f st "P'"8 t0 , «<«te ">«? complete. 

12-foot wide travel lanes in each The D0T nas retained the 
New Dinky Bridge Leads direction. finn of p-re^nc R Harris Inc., 

Route 1 Improvements Durin g the summer of 1992, 
Replacing the Dinky railroad the DOT also plans' to remove 
bridge over Route 1 and widen- and reconstruct the outside- 
ing the highway from two to shoulders from the Penns Neck 
three lanes in each direction Circle to Mapleton Road to pro- 
from Alexander Road to Wash- vide six lanes of traffic, three 
ington Road will be the first of northbound and three south- 
the several projects planned by bound. The inside shoulder 
the New Jersey Department of would be reduced from three 
Transportation to improve traf- feet three inches in width to one 
fie flow along the highway. foot three inches, and there 
The NJDOT held several would be no outside shoulders, 
public information centers in The estimated cost is 
the last week to provide infor- $665,000. 
mation on the projects to area 

residents. At each there were Route 1 Widening 
maps and handouts, and repre- Moving north along Route 1, 
sentatives of the Department to the DOT plans to continue 
answer questions. widening Route 1 to three lanes 

from Plainsboro Road to For- 

According to the handouts, restal Road and to construct an 
construction of the Route 1 overpass and interchange at 
Dinky Railroad Bridge replace- Route 1 and Scudders Mill 
ment could begin in the fall of Road. The road would be mov- 
1992 and is expected to take 18 ed some 2,000 feet north, per- 
months. The Dinky would con- mitting access lanes to and 
tinue to operate over the ex- from northbound Route 1 on the 
isting rail bridge while approx- east side of Route 1 and a wider 
imately 2,900 feet of railroad circle providing access to and 
track is realigned and the new from southbound Route 1 on the 
bridge is built parallel and west side of the highway, 
slightly to the south of the ex- This relocated wider circle is 
isting bridge. of concern to the residents of 

The estimated cost, exclud- the Princeton Landing develop- 
ing right of way acquisition and ment, who are concerned about 
engineerng is $4.5 million. Part traffic noise, lights and fumes 
of the project includes widening being closer to their homes, 
the highway from Alexander Some have suggested the DOT 
Road to Washington Road by erect a noise barrier to shield 
removing and reconstructing the townhouses. 



KULLER TRAVEL CO. 

108 NASSAU ST. 
PRINCETON, N.J. 

PHONE 924-2560 ifis 



i IMPRESSIONS 

OF PRINCETON 

r 15 Wlthtrepoon SL, Princeton - 

CUrafc&*?»M.ro*fcM-GJli 
921-1541 



CENTER SHOE 
& REPAIR 

Princeton Shopping Center 

924-6920 



Continued on Next Page 



WE WILL PURCHASE 
YOUR JEWELRY 

Hamilton invites you to seek our expert advice 

should you wish to sell your estate or antique jewelry, 

fine diamonds or timepieces. Our specialists will 

handle any special arrangements you may require 

with discretion and courtesy. 

Bankers', attorneys' and executors' inquiries 

are welcome. 

We offer estate and insurance appraisal services. 



HAMILTON 

IEWELERS SINCE 1912 



Princeton, IM.J., 92 Nassau Street, 609-683-4200 
Lawrenceuille, N.J., Alt. Rte 1 & Texas Ave., 609-771-9400 

Palm Beach and Palm Beach Gardens. FL 
For further information phone 1-800-5-HAMILTON 




YES 



we have 
PINK DOGWOODS P 
& PERENNIALS 

more than 200 varieties 



winner govemer's trophy 
1991 N.J. Flower Show 





LUSCIOUS LEATHERS 

At 1/3 off during April only! 

OnlythecombinedresourcesofBarrylnteriorsandcooperating^ 
could produce an event of this magnitude. All leather seating ■ ol *o*W* 
madeofselcted hides that are carefully crafted into seating that grows more comtortaUe 
andbeaSfShage. Come visit us during this rare event. Factory representative and 
nurSfoforoLional designers will be on hand for consultation. Remember here are 

April only. ^^ ^ m 



INTE 



Forrestal Village, flt. #1, P/imsIM, New Jersey ■ (609) 243-9099 

fll. II, Fairless Hills, Pennsylvania • (215) 943-8280 

Call lor our dee brochure 



SENIOR CITIZENS CALENDAR 

Information Provided by Senior Resource Center, 
Spruce Circle. 924-7108 
Wednesday, April 17: Free legal help. Call Senior Re- 
source Center, 924-7108. 
Free blood pressure screening. Redding Circle. 

10:00 a.m.: Special Walk to Roger's Wildlife Preserve. 
Call the Senior Resource Center (924-7108) or Princeton 
Recreation Dept (921-9480) to register. 

10:30 a.m.: Readings over coffee: We Walked, Then Ran, 
a true story by Alice Muggerditchian Shipley, Princeton 
Public Library. 
10:30 a.m.: Book Club, Suzanne Patterson Center. 
11:00 a.m.: VIM, YW/YMCA 
1:00 p.m.: Sewing group, Suzanne Patterson Center. 
1:30 p.m.: Free blood pressure screening, Senior Re- 
source Center. 

1:30 p.m.: Betty Moore will honor the music of Quincy 
Jones at the Suzanne Patterson Center. 
Thursday, April 18: 55 Plus, Jewish Center. 
10:30 a.m.: Bridge Group, Suzanne Patterson Center. 
1 1 :00 a.m.: Art Class, Suzanne Patterson Center. 
11:30 a.m.: Chinese cooking class. Senior Resource Cen- 
ter. Learn to cook new recipes and then eat lunch. Call 924- 
7108. Small fee to cover supplies. 

1:00 p.m.: Pinochle, Suzanne Patterson Center. 
Friday, April 19: S.H.I.P. (Senior Health Insurance Pro- 
gram), Senior Resource Center. Call 924-5865 for an ap- 
pointment. 
9:30 a-m.: Shopping Trip, Suzanne Patterson Center. 
1 1:00 am: VTM, YW/YMCA. 
12:30 p.m.: Friday Club, YWCA. 
2:30 p.m.: Disabled swim, YWCA. (Fee charged) 
Saturday, April 20: 5:00 p.m.: Disabled swim, YWCA. 
(Fee charged.) 

Jewelry Making Clinic (4 week session, *42; 8 week ses- 
sion, *!!), sponsored by Baubles Jewelry Store. Call 921- 
9480 to register. 

Monday, April 22: No Flexercise. 
10:30 a.m.: Ping Pong, Suzanne Patterson Center. 
1 1 :00 a.m.: VTM, YW/YMCA. 

12:30 p.m.: Drop in Lounge, Jewish Center: Dr. Vivian 
Carlin, gerontologist & specialist in housing alternatives for 
the elderly, Discussion on "Can Mom Live Alone?". Re- 
freshments. All are welcome. 

Tuesday, April 23: 10:30 am: Art Club, Suzanne Patter- 
son Center. 
12:30 p.m.: Game Day, Suzanne Patterson Center. 
1:00 p.m.: Pinochle, Suzanne Patterson Center. 
7:30-9:00 pm: Men's discussion group, YWCA. (Breast 
Health Calendar.) For more information call 497-2126. 

7:30-9:30 pm: As Parents Grow Older. A series of 6 
discussion groups to help adult children increase their 
knowledge of the aging process, Senior Resource Center. 
$7.50 fee all inclusive. For information call 924-7108. 



current and future traffic de- 
mand and provide capacity. It 
says that other interchange 
concepts were studied but re- 
jected because they did not pro- 
vide sufficient capacity for the 
traffic demand or adequate 
level of service. 

The estimated cost for the 
widening and new interchange, 
including right of way, road- 
way and bridge construction, 
utility locations and engineer- 
ing is $57.5 million. This project 
would receive federal state 
funding through interstate de- 
designation funds. 

Construction "may" begin by 
the fall of 1994 with an 
estimated completion date of 
the fall of 1997. 

— Barbara I... Johnson 



Children Are Invited 
To Musical Experience 

The Presbyterian Coopera- 
tive Nursery School will pres- 
ent its annual "Music Morn- 
ing" Saturday from 10 to 11:30 
at Nassau Presbyterian 
Church. 

Especially for children, this 
musical experience will feature 
"A Day in the Life of a Dog," 
an audience-participation pro- 
duction. Musical background 
will be provided by folk singer 
and guitarist Pat McKinley. 

Admission is $1 at the door. 
Participants should enter at the 
rear of the building by the park- 
ing lot and go upstairs to the 
Assembly Room. Refresh- 
ments will be served after the 
play at 11. 



Are you ready for... 

1fe 




fkt£e.c\- 

QP4- 



Sex Role Stereotyping 
Is Topic of Workshop 

A workshop, "Stale Roles 
and Tight Buns," will be pre- 
sented from 10 to 11:30 a.m. 
Friday at the Marriott For- 
restal Village. 

The workshop is designed to 
help men and women learn how 
the male socialization process 
limits men's career choices and 



Tnni/>c nf tho T/imn constructing a reverse jug han- potential for healthy relation 

j upws oj me 1 own Me at Meadow r^ for j eft shjps 

conn™*! r,om P.g. ,7 and U-turns. Alexander Road The event is open to the 

Consulting engineers, for the WOUIU wicwatciraiTsm.j- w paum; on a pun^grei, atrvrr 

design of all these projects. tne norUl , and a bridge and in- basis, by calling (201) 547-2188. 

Alexander RnnH p/« n terchange constructed that 

Alexander Road Plan wou , d provjde a „ movements 

A bigger project, costing to and from Route 1 through ac- Sten Aprnhirc Place 
more taking longer, and for ceS s lanes and a clover leaf on I3 1o k, f S v »!?f» 
which a different design team the Princeton side of the high- Ava »able at YMCA 
has been retained, is the pro- way and access lanes on the The Princeton Family YMCA 
posed Route 1-Alexander Road West Windsor side. is now offering "Step Into Ac- 

interchange. It involves widen- The DOT handout says the Hon," an aerobics class based 
ing Route 1 from Quakerbridge proposed widening and inter- on a stair climbing concept 
Road to Alexander Road and change design would satisfy the which combines leg and arm 

movements to give a low im- 
pact/high intensity workout. 
The class meets weekly on 
Thursdays at 6:15 p.m. in the 
All Purpose Room. 

For more information, call 
497-YMCA. 




60th ANNUAL 

BRYN MAWR BOOK SALE 

MAY 1 - 5, 1991 

At the Ice Hockey Rink 
Princeton Day School, Princeton, New Jersey 




Wednesday, May 1 

1 1 to 4 p.m. Preview sale $10* 

4 p.m. to 9 p.m. Official opening 



9 a.m. to 9 p.m. 



Thursday, May 2 



9 a.m. to 9 p.m! 



Friday, May 3 



9 a.m. to 7 p.m 



Saturday, May 4 



Half-price day 



Sunday, May 5 

1 2 noon to 4 p.m. $3 per carton 

Please bring your own cartons. 

'Preview sale: $10.00 will be charged for admission between 1 1 a.m. and 4 p.m. on Wednesday. 

Numbered tickets will be available at the Rink beginning at 10 a.m. 

There is no admission charge at other times. 

921-7479 



GOVERNOR'S TROPHY* WINNER: Ambleside 
Gardens, which has made a habit of winning the 
Governor's Trophy at the New Jersey Flower Show, 
did so again this year, with this rustic gazebo scene. 
It's now on display at the garden center on Route 
206, Belle Mead. 



For Those Unaccustomed To Compromise. 
From Those Who Never Consider It. 




From exemplary materials to exquisite work- 
manship. Rutt overlooks no detail creating 
America's finest custom cabinetrv for America's 
most discerning homeowners. 
Begin planning your new kitchen, batli. or spe- 
cial cabinetry with a visit to an Authorized Rutt 
Dealer. Discuss vour ideas with a fullv qualified 
professional. And ask for Rutt's Folio of Custom 
Cabinetry. It provides a wealth of new ideas, and 
demonstrates why an investment in Rutt adds 
value to your home and your life. 
Vour Folio is available at these Authorized Kull 
Custom Cabinetrv Dealers, or by writing to Rutt 

Custom Cabinetry. P.O. Box 129. Dept 

Goodville. PA 17528. Please enclose $7.00. 
which includes postage and handling. 

Nassau 
Kitchen & Bath 

Route 206 at Mountainvlew Plaza 

Belle Mead, New Jersey 

(201) 359-2026 



' 



Area Performing Arts Groups Scrambling to Cover Shortfall 
In Annual Funds Usually Provided by State and Corporations 

frnm^th 1 !! fLT* t0 rf the *'?* S«M ly rMe > ved g™ nl * from a n hour, and there are addi- seats, it is (he only performing 
™,nJ? -fi, • C0U S.' y ' ^ Mercer County Council on Uonal costs for recording, stage space of its size in Princeton - 
coupled wtth a recession that the Humanities, which were set-up and strike, piano tuning capacious but not cavernous 
has reduced corporate giving also cut some 42 percent this and the use of risers for a and centrally located A group 
and imperiled the big ticket year, but in receiving the state chorus. A typical bill for a must start in January to get 
fundraiser, has forced perform- grants they were no longer eli- Chamber Symphony concert performance dates for the I 
ing arts groups to be more Bible for county funds. runs to $2619, including a following year, and all groups 
resourceful in managing their The Chamber Symphony of recording of the performance; seem to want to schedule their 
affairs and more inventive in Princeton was awarded $15,800 f or Pro Musica it can run concerts at the same times dur- 
seekmg out the funds to con- by the N.J. Council on the Arts higher ing the season 
tinue their programs. for 1990-91, down $7,100 from Since the renovation of — ■ 

These difficulties have at- the $22,900 the orchestra receiv- Richardson, in which rest- Pro Musica expects to be I 
fected the number and type of ed for 1989-90. According to its rooms were installed and the booking at other locations in the 
programs offered by musical executive director, Cathy Van- acoustics improved, the hall is coming season, partly because 
performance groups, reduced derpool, further cuts can be ex- much in demand. With 850 con«™.d on n.« Pan. 

their ability to pay a manager pected for next year. 

and increased their reliance on 

volunteers for professional ser- With a roster of from 25 to 42 
vices such as accounting and professional instrumentalists 
bookkeeping. Nonetheless, and Mark Laycock as its sala- 
three Princeton area music "ed music director and con- 
groups are managing to hang ductor, the Chamber Sym- 
onanddowell, convincedof the phony's annual operating 
continuing improvement in the budget is $150,000. This year it 
quality of their performances increased the number of Sun- 
and their value to the com- day afternoon subscription con- 
munity. certs it gives at Richardson Au- 
ditorium from four to five. In 

Because money is tight, addition to these self-sponsored 
Princeton Pro Musica had to concerts, the Chamber Sym- 
cut its manager, Claudia phony performs a New Year's 
Snowden Rawley, to half time Eve concert in Richardson for 
and then lost her altogether a fee for the Princeton Arts 
when she found the fulltime Council, 
employment she needed with According to Ms. Vander- 
June Opera Festival of New pool, one half of the Chamber 
Jersey as of April 1 . Founded in Symphony's budget goes to the 
1978 by Frances F. Slade, its musicians, music director and 
music director, Princeton Pro guest artists. This year the 

A**************** •••********** 

"It is difficult to figure out where 
the next $5,000 grant is coming from. 
If we get $500 in the course of a 

year, I consider that lucky. " 

•A****************************'* 



[Wl Kare M.Gaydos.A.SI.D. 

L^dJ Interior Design 



Complete Decorating Service 
Residential • Commercial 



By appointment 
737-1010 



Beautiful ESTATE Jewelry 

59 Palmer Squure Wesl * Princeton ■ *>24-202fi 



L-I-B-MRY 



THE FORMULA FOR LIFELONG LEARNING 



PRINCETON PUBLIC LIBRARY • 65 WITHERSPOON STREET . 924-9529 



Musica is a chorus of 100 to 120 
voices that performs major 
choral works. In the best of 
times it schedules four 
subscription concerts a year at 
Richardson Auditorium. 

Last summer, even before 
the New Jersey Council on the 
Arts announced a cut of 30 to 40 
percent in the amount that it 
would be handing out to per- 
forming arts groups for 1991-91, ( 
Pro Musica decided to elimi- 
nate its February concert, the 
Mozart Mass in C and Bern- 
stein's Chichester Psalms 
with orchestra and replace it 
with a less expensive a cap- 
pella concert. In June, Pro 
Musica will be performing 
Rachmaninoff's Vespers in 
churches in Plainsboro, Tren- 
ton and New Brunswick in- 
stead. 

State Funding 

Actually, Pro Musica was 
one of two Princeton-based per- 
forming groups to be funded by 
the New Jersey State Council 
on the Arts for the first time 
this year. The other was 
Voices, an ensemble of profes- 
sional singers directed by 
Lynne Ransom that performs 
in a variety of venues in the 
Princeton area. Both had pre- 



pianist Robert Taub has per- 
formed a different Mozart 
piano concerto at each of the 
subscription concerts in 
recognition of the bicentennial 
of Mozart's death. Ticket sales 
contribute roughly 25 to 35 per- 
cent towards the budget of a 

music performing group; the 

rest must be raised through 
fundraisers, corporate and in- 
dividual gifts and foundation 
grants. 

Ms. Vanderpool's position, 
once full time, is now part time, 
and there is another part time 
office worker on the staff. The 
Chamber Symphony rents a 
room from the Arts Council, 
and Pro Musica, whose annual 
budget is nearly that of the 
Chamber Symphony, a room at 
20 Nassau Street. 

Voices has the free use of the 
third floor of Ms. Ransom's 
home in Pennington. Its budget 
is about $90,000 a year, and it 
too has a part time manager, 
Teri Deane. 

Fee for Richardson $1350 

The basic fee charged by 
Richardson Auditorium to a 
non-University group for a con- 
cert with paid admissions is 
$1350. Rehearsal costs are $135 




reener 
ouse 



GIVE THANKS 

to your assistants! 
Remember 
Secretary's Week 
April 22nd 

(We Deliver) 

Our specials include: 

• bouquets 

• paper clip holder with flowers 
. pencil ceramic with flowers 
» hydroponic desk plant 
- gardens 



• blooming plants 

• gift certificates 
Princeton Shopping Center 
N. Harrison St., Princeton 
(609)924-7718 0pen Mon-Sat 10-6 





Simply Delightful... 

LI LI RICHARDS essential 
warm-weather sleeveless sundress 

or"slark'"biack7while prints. Washable 
collon beauties for sizes 6-16 with 
basic alterations free. 94. & 103. 



Add Ihe indispensible black or while 

crisp cotton-pique jacket, 

TANNER in a wide array of 

sizes from 6-18. 120. 



Montgomery Shopping Center 

Rt. 206, Rocky Hill 

(609) 924-4820 



Open rill 

'lilK'JII 




"' I 




GJIjp tEmjUfil? g>lmp 



Wevolidm 
;arajii; parkin; 




j/fo&imtuJl, 
^ CANDIES 

Del Val 
PHARMACY 

1lBo»3t.P»r«*»«NJ 

Uo&BnmmtUP 

737-0900 

Mon-F ri M; Sn M«h E»i H 



E. Bowers 
Landscape Designer 



Residential Landscapes 
Garden Designs 



(201)247-7546 
Highland Park, N.J. 08904 



Performing Arts 

Continued from Pag* 1 

the Richardson stage does not 
easily accommodate a big 



PLANNING BENEFIT: Members of the Voices board planning the April 28th 
benefit are, from left, seated, Linda Gardner and Patricia Saporlto; standing, 
Bruce Samet, Ruth Baggltt, Martha Maletta, Michael Vesey, David Kowalskl, 
Richard Swain, Jeffrey Farrlngton, Nancy Plum and George Hyde. 

have their favorite causes or night. The Greater Princeton 
performing group, and it is Youth Orchestra enjoys a 
very difficult to get them to special relationship with the 
shift or enlarge their alle- Hyatt Regency Princeton, 
giance. But as Pro Musica mu- where its balls have been held, 
sic director Frances Slade Voices is happy with Stuart 
chorus and orchestra, partly says .. Nobody likes to ask for Schoo i as ^ location for its 
because of cost, and partly to m But have ^ keep events 

enhance eligibility for state and ask in g an d asking and asking, 

foundation grants. According to and have tokeep trying dif- Voices also enjoys friendly 
Ms. Rawley, the New Jersey feren( thj „ relations with American Rein- 

Councu on the Arte likes to fund . _ . F d sur ance Company, which in- 

groups that collaborate W!th Musicians Halse tunas ensemble to sing at 

other organizations, focus on One way is to use the musi- ceremonies for its 

minorities and "special consti- cians themselves to perform at ^^ m Forresta i cen- 
tuencies" and are spread a fund raiser. John Kennedy, i subsequently , or its 

across the state. Philadelphia operatic _ tenor, christmas p 7 r ties Voices 

Next year, Pro Musica will will perform Bizet and Bern- rti to Lvn £ e Ransom then 
be collaborating with New Jer- stein at the "Paris in April" ZwtZtteZmwSZa ask 
sey Ballet in performing Carl benefit on April 28 at Stuart went 
Orff's Carmina Burana at the School for Voices, just as Kevin 
State Theatre in New Bruns- Deas, a baritone soloist with 
wick, the John Harms Center in Pro Musica, will give a recital 
Englewood and at the War Me- May 10 at the Unitarian Church 
morial in Trenton in addition to to benefit the chorus, 
a possible Richardson perform- Pro Musica is having multi- 
— - •—— — — jjlo fjinHrajcprs this vfyjTj On 

Multi-Cultural Approach """ 



( ii nrir 

sday, 



olved 



Foundations also look for 



Macy's Benefit Day at Quaker 
Bridge Mall, and it is sponsor- 



ed for a volunteer with finan- 
cial expertise to join the Voices 
board and got Patricia Sapor- 
ito, who was instrumental in 
having American Reinsurance 
donate free graphics and com- 
puters and a printer for the 

ble's office. 
Corporate Giving Down 



is noticeably 
reduced from what it has been 
in the past. "Corporations don't 
have as much to give," says 
Nancy Plum, president of 
Voices, who adds, "I wouldn't 
conceive of going to a bank or 

Continued on Next Page 



If 



a e mui a ^XaTaoo S roacL h For "!? * 50/50 ' Cash raffle ' with *» ^"P 8 »«"* "»' ™ 
jltu^yeaTvrcesS *°"f ™mbers selling raffle porate giving 
me pasimree years .voices nas tickets, as well as a rummage 

$1^000 from the Gera dine Church in Rocky Hill, where it 
Drige Foundation, mcluding a renearses on ^^ m nts 
matchmggrantforwhichithad ln j Pr0 Musi y ca . s B 22 . 

to ra.se $5,000, for he pro- member Chamber Chorus wUl 
grams it gives in schools Using rform English music from 
wo to four singers from its ros- £ e Renaissance t „ Be „ ja ™ m 

c1a£ VoteSSZS; Britten at a Garden Part * a " ' 
P^arn"?" dlYS Educational Testing Service. 

schools throughout central and 

southern New Jersey. These Voices is also scheduling a 
programs give elementary and second fundraiser this year, 
high school youth the oppor- The April 28 gala follows last 
tunity of hearing professional fall's Family Fest at which 
singers in works such as Seymour Barab's Chanticleer 
Rossini's Cat Duet for soprano was performed. For three 
and mezzo-soprano and talking years running, the Chamber 
about the music with the per- Symphony engaged Fred 
formers afterwards. Starr's Louisiana Repertory 

For a time Voices employed Jazz Band to play for dinner 
an education coordinator, who and dancing, initially at the In- 
would send a packet of stitute for Advanced Study and 
materials to the school in ad- later at DKM headquarters in 
vance, but that job is now being Lawrenceville. This year, the 
done by a volunteer, a retired Chamber Symphony tried to 
French teacher from Pennsyl- reach a younger crowd with a 
vania. Voices also sponsored a "Mozart to Madonna" event for 
composition contest, which it which tickets were priced at $35 
had to cut this year. . instead of $100 a head. 

"Nobody wants to pay $100 

Fundraisers are an essential anymore," Ms. Vanderpool 
source of revenue for these says. "Mozart to Madonna- 
groups and require increasing was to have been held in early 
ingenuity and inventiveness. February in the Forrestai 
Princeton Pro Musica used to Village food hall. However the 
hold chocolate dessert parties Gulf War, recession jitters and 
or art auctions, but as Ms. poor ticket sales forced the 
Rawley observed, "The day of Chamber Symphony to cancel 
the monstrous huge gala is it. Instead, a Cabaret evening 
out." Arts groups compete with at Scanticon is planned for May 
social service groups for dates 18 with Liz Fillo, Roo Brown, 
and locations for an event, just Dan Berkowitz and other veter- 
as they compete for perform- ans of the original Nassau Inn 
ance dates, and volunteers, Cabaret. Ticket prices are $40. 
who often have full time jobs, The relationship a group 
don't have the time or energy develops with one of the Route 
to think up new and different l hotels or corporations is im- 
ways of attracting what are portant to the success of a fund- 
essentially the same patrons, raiser. Scanticon has hosted the 
she says. Chamber Symphony's post- 

Ms. Rawley feels that most concert teas and thus is a 
people with money already logical choice for the cabaret 




^™^|^S^ig^N^01JSERV>T10Nl^EO^Nc,. 



Earth Day Festival 




Sponsored by the Whole Earth Center 
Sunday, April il • 1 to 6PM • Turning Basin Park 

(where Alexander Road intersects the D&R Canal Towpatn) 

THROUGHOUT THE AFTERNOON 

Exhibitors from area groups will raise local environmental issues and 

discuss what actions the community can take to address them. 

Mus/c - steel drum and conga players, acoustic guitar and song 

performed by Tom Holland and Chris Harford. 

Children's activities including games and a 3 foot Earth Ball 

Canal Walks, beginning at 2PM, with canal 

historian Gordon Keith, Bruce Herrick from Trees for Trenton, 

and Barbara Ross from the D&R Canal Watch. 

Sandwiches, fruit, and juke provided by the Whole Earth Center. 



CAItrM DAV CEREMONY • 2 :30PM 



Beginning with a Communal Expression led by Greg Lynn Weaver. 

Mayors Marvin Reed and Dick Woodbridge and Pam Hersch 

from Princeton University follow with their views on threats to 

the local environment and what steps the community can take 

to safeguard the area's environmental future. 

WHOLE EARTH CENTER 

360 NASSAU ST. • PRINCETON • 924-7429 • MON.-FRI. 10-7 SAT. 10-6 



d*3"3Vad'*>NU.NW1d 33Bl.'*>Nl!.0/\ ON* -ONli-lorAHaiiai HOOObHX 39NVHO -ONI-LOBd 



\ 



«ti Re Fit § 

Quality contributions for the 1991 June Fete 
are now being accepted by the Auction Committee: 

Chairpersons: Eva Schwab (924-8375) & Margie Alexander (924-3928) 

Solicitation: Mona Fisher (924-1895), Eleanor Hoisington (924-3968), 

Mizyal Albus (683-4467) & Mary Ann Williams (683-4031) 

Contact any of these representatives 

to arrange drop-off of small items at: 

Th ™}1l*Z e FaciUt y. Princeton House 
905 Herrontown Road, Princeton 

Tues & Sat, 9 am to noon 

Quality items can be arranged to be 
picked up through auction representatives. 



No one other than those named ahnw fc „.,«,„ • j ,. 
the AuxOiajyofthe Meteal^tToTprl^TsJZt 
or accept donorfons/or the June lorn^te^aoT 



rut-A, .^^butions Benefit the 
Medical Center at Princeton Foundation 






FUND RAISING FOR JUNE OPERA: Members of the June Opera Festival board 
of trustees meet to discuss the progress of their 1991 fund-raising campaign. 
Seated are W. Henry Sayen IV, vice president, John A. Ellis, president, and Frank 
Breese III; standing are Thomas G. White, David Dodge, H. Calvin Minor, Ar- 
tistic Director Michael Pratt and Executive Director Deborah Sandler. 



Sandra Grundfest. Ed.D. 

(609) 921-8401 

for career consulting 

601 Ewing St., C-1 



Princeton. N.J 



■ FOODi 

FOR 
THOUGHT 



Route 27 
Kingston, NJ 

Across from the 
Kingston Mall 

921-2016 

M-Sat 10-7; Sun 10-4 




GREATXMPRESSIONS 



REATXI 



GRAND 
OPENING! 

Come check us out! 



Quality Princeton Clothing 

Complete Selection of 

Princeton Paraphernalia 



Heavyweight Sweatshirts • T-Shirts 
Shorts • Boxers • Hats 



We Specialize in 

Original Art and Design 

Custom Screen Printing 

& Embroidery Available 

136 Nassau Street 
Princeton, NJ 08542 

609-497-0022 



Performing Arts 

Continued from Page 20 

a corporation for $5,000 or 
$10,000 in this economy. But I 
will ask them to buy a table for 
12 at our gala." 

She continues, "It is difficult 
to figure out where the next 
$5,000 grant is coming from. If 
we get $500 in the course of a 
year I consider that lucky." 

To cope with these difficult 
• times Ms. Plum has organized 
the Voices board into eight or 
nine committees to address the 
areas in which Voices makes 
money — i.e. marketing, 
special events, finance and de- 
velopment, program ads, edu- 
cational events. 

"I told the board we had to 
cut back on self -sponsored con- 
certs and concentrate on the 
activities, like our educational 
programs, that make money," 
she says. Voices is in debt some 
$35,000 from having done the 
Bach St. John Passion with an 
•' orchestra in Richardson Audi- 
torium two years ago. Ms. Plum 
says it was too big a concert too 
soon, before Voices had built 
enough support. 

Business Expertise 
, Under her direction, Voices 
has sought the expertise it 
needs on a pro bono basis from 
business service organizations 
in the state — expertise to put 
proper financial systems in 
place, review its marketing and 
long range plan and computer- 
ize the office. For instance, two 
volunteer certified public ac- 
countants were recruited for 
the board from an organization 
called Accountants for the 
Public Interest. 

Voices also has a request in 
to Business Volunteers for the 
Arts, headquartered in New 
Brunswick, for a marketing 
person for its board. Princeton 
Pro Musica has also racked up 
a deficit and struggles with 
cash flow problems, but Ms. 
Slade attributes them to fund- 
raisers last year that did not 
succeed as well as they were 
budgeted for. She says the def- 
icit has not increased this year. 

Volunteers from among the 
performers themselves are 
tapped for chores from writing 



TOWN TOPICS 

is 
printed entirely 

on 
recycled paper 



press releases to setting up 
computer programs for the of- 
fice. But this can lead to the 
same people always volunteer- 
ing and volunteer burnout, as 
Ms. Rawley noted. All three 
groups interviewed expect to 
increase the size of the board 
and are seeking specific talents 
in the new members. 

But there are hopeful signs. 
The Chamber Symphony al- 
most doubled the number of 
subscribers this year and had 
what Ms. Vanderpool calls "our 
best year ever." Whether this 
was due to Mozart program- 
ming in a Mozart bicentennial 
year or better promotion, the 
orchestra is drawing from a 
wider geographical area. "I 
just hope we can hold on to 
them when we're not doing 
Mozart," she adds. 

"A Scramble" 

She acknowledges that find- 
ing the funds to keep going in 
these times is "a scramble." 
The Chamber Symphony is for- 
tunate in having generous indi- 
vidual donors on its board and 
it sends out an annual appeal 
letter in November from which 
a healthy list of donors is ac- 
cumulating. But she says that 
trading around, swapping in- 
formation, cooperating with 
other groups and sharing mail- 
ing lists are all survival tech- 
niques. 

The Chamber Symphony has 
received a grant of $12,660 to do 
a joint concert with the Prince- 
ton High School Choir and Or- 
chestra, which will increase its 
exposure in the community. 
Princeton Pro Musica has re- 
ceived a grant in excess of 
$5,000 from Chorus America to 
do the east coast premiere of a 
new work by a woman com- 
poser based on the poetry of 
Yehan (Mrs. Anwar) Sadat 
next year, which will be an in- 
teresting experience. 

Mere survival is not what any 
of the groups is about. The way 
Ms. Slade describes Pro 
Musica's commitment to 
growth is illustrative of how 
each feels about itself and how 
it is improving, and why it is 
endeavoring to overcome the 
difficulties of the times. 

"We work hard to improve 
what we're doing every year," 
she says. "It's nice to get the 
excellent reviews and the ap- 
plause, but we are building to 
get better, and that seems to be 
happening. I'm really pleased 
with our improving quality. We 
want not only to survive but to 
continue to grow." 

—Barbara L. Johnson 




HELENE REYNOLDS & ASSOCIATES 
EOUCATIOKAL COHSUITAHTS 

Specialists In Educational Planning 
and Placement for IS years... 

• College Counseling 1 Placement 
. Prep school Selection 

• Alternative programs 'jr ffutotswjh 
learning isabifihes ana^e^speaalneeas 

■•Family Counseling tor the In*n0u»i • fcoucenn™ 

609-921-1326 




GET A 




FREE 



€ngland€f 
I'KingKoil 




■ with this coupon only ■ 
•• Take 

I an additional 



! 10% off! 



j Mattress Price | 

LDoea not apply to n 

previous purchases. !| 



That's Right! This week get a FREE 

.Matching Box With Your Purchase of 

any Mattress at Atlantic BedQuarters 

Already Super Low Prices! 
Quantities are Limited. HURRY IN! 
Sorry Previous Sales do not apply. 



0RTH0FIRM* 

MATTRESS 
TWIN- $52.00 
FULL-$7200 
QUEEN-$1I2.00 



BOX 



SERTA ELITE SUPER FWU 

MATTRESS 

TWIN- $196.00 

FULL -$298 00 
QUEEN -$396.00 

KING- $499 00 

BOX . 



SEALY/SERTA 
FIRM* 

MATTRESS 
TAW $76.00 
FULL-$I16.00 
QUEEN $176.00 
BOX 



PREMIUM SEPTA 
COMFORT MASTER 
MATTRESS 
TWW $249.00 
FULL- $349.00 
QUEEN $448 00 
KING $548.00 
BOX 



SEALY/SERTA 
EXTRA FIRM' 

MATTRESS 
TWIN $96.00 
FULL -$136.00 
QUEEN $196.00 
BOX 



KIND K0IL 
SACflO GUARD 
MATTRESS (IS'TEAH 
TWIN-S269.0O WARRANTO 
FULL-J369.00 
OUEEN-W69.00 
KING4599.00 




NEW YORKER* 

10 YR, WARRANTY) 



110 

MAI 



STRESS 
TWIN -$13600 
FULL- $176.00 
QUEEN $268 00 

BOX 



ENGLANDER 

TWW -$249.00 "«"""« 
FULL- $34900 
QUEEN $449.00 

KING -$549 00 
BOX 



FIRM QUILT CROWN 

MATTRESS 
TWIN $168.00 
FULL- $238.00 
QUEEN $298.00 
KING- $449.00 
BOX 



PREMIUM SEALY 
SUPREME 
MATTRESS otyEAR 
TWIN $299 00 WARfWflYl 
FULL-$39900 
QUEEN $499.00 
KING $599.00 
BOX 



ADJUSTABLE 
ELECTRIC BEDS 

Medicare Provider »PR/213056 
Chiopradic Endorsed 

<^- 50% 



ENGLANDER 
PS102 
MATTRESS I^AB 
TWW $29900 *""""> 
FULL $399.00 
OUEEN- $499.00 
KING $599.00 
BOX 



ENGLANDER 
ULTUATE110 

MATTRESS I2DVEAR 

TWW- $39900 WABWmi 

FULL $499.00 

QUEEN- $689.00 

KING $69900 
BOX 



DAYBEDS 

starling at 

99 



HI-RISERS^ 
Starting at $159 




HOURS: 



?! ATLANTIC (m>Omm«) JP 

; Outlet > ^^ * LSJ 



Mon-Fri: 

Sat: 

Sun: 

Warehouse viuyp. 

Mon-Sat 10-b; tiun 11-5 

PRINCETON/PLAINSBORO 

609-275-8240 

Scuddars Mill & 

Schalks Crossing Rds. 

(next to Caldor) 




HAMILTON SO JIIERCERVH.LE 

609-568-6383 

1164 Route 33 

Inert to Patterson Chevy) 



■ Yt»Ctoa»i»iri>Coiivle»B«o^Sa)-RwChkeC^tenol3ppl> 



EW1NG/TRENTON 

&09-396-06O9 

Warehouse Outlet 

1600 N. Olden Ave. 

{next to Heath Lumber} 

Cbseouts Only 




Parking Plan Offered ^pS^Uity would 

For Public Library Site be fina £;ed jointly by the 

To the Editor of Town Topics: Township and Borough. 

Expanding the Princeton . parking fees would Be sei 

Public Library at its present jointly by the Township and 



B0 . r °,^enues from the parkuig 



site as recommended by the Li 

brary Trustees, without correc- . n«v C i.u«. ■■-■-■,, ioint 

ting the parking situation, facility would be shared join 

would be a disservice to Town- )y by the Township and Bor 

ship residents - and to Bor- ugh. j« io „»rt nark 

ough residents, as well. Con- . A properly tfWff*™ 

trary to popular perception, in g facility would J>ay 



* California™ Offers Way Don't Treat Teacher 
S i To Curb Teacher Greed' Like V.etnam Veterans 

§ To the Editor of Town Topics: ^^"XJhTng" 

S during spring, summer and man Princeton High 

" n^aXama^to^eeand my colleagues acquired in f oblem that affects not on- spoon Street that to L brary 

S the n^eTbXeSprS^ several extravagant wants: We ^ ubrary but also the sur- Trustees have requested for, B 

2 ^^rj.^n. r ^r D roHems wa nted «"* h mone y to b " y vival of the heart of our town, pansion, reserve it until funds 

S^daSweSSrebernJbooks, attend plays take Soreo^er I am concerned that lor construction are in hand In 

2 <S in CaUfornJa 1CW5 courses, travel and send our £5° Borough will not be able to me meantime, create a green 

" M)Ked '" ( ■•"""■ ' ^ children to coUege. solve the problem in the near spaC e there -a Township/Bor- 

Because teaching salanes , uture because of the pressure ugh park - a Pr ' nce ; '' 

were "modest," I and every f fjsca , cons traints. Public Library Park. It wouia 

soften the parking facility 



the library. 

lam concerned that the Bor- 
ough has not addressed a park- 



ship and Borough. 
Asforthe^longWither- 



g we solved in California 
*■ years earlier. 

8 



"^^VSErtS male member of my depart- 

toth^ragmgPrS,^ Z±-£ ^ZnTmSr ' «» -P^.5«=!* ^^£"SS. tor 



o you published my 



J lem: 



etc. 

Unfortunately, letters alone 
won't stop the 7.5% pay raise. 
Let me remind you how Califor- 
nia citizens solved the problem 
back in 1978. We stopped un- 
bridled greed in its tracks. 



It was, of course, Proposition 
cut taxes by mofe'^man' ^i 

billion! The schools cleaned princ^ton^Regional ^Schools charged with the responsibility 
house of all kinds of bloated and F am j]y Consultation Center, for developing an appropriate 
unnecessary programs and This program, which has been parking facility at the site. The 
thousands of unneeded employ- aroun d since 1984, is based on implications of this action 
ees. They even stopped the ^ we U-founded' assumption would be: 
abuses of flying first class and ^j "gaining family support * The land now occupied by 
staying at plush hotels for real- { or academic achievement is the "Library Parking Lot" 
critical to the successful educa- would be owned jointly by the 
tion of students with a variety Township and Borough, 
of school problems." * A parking facility would be 

The Center deals with planned jointly by the Town- 
children whose academic pro- 
gress is hindered by excessive 
absences, inattentiveness, 
behavior problems, substance 
abuse, and other problems. 
While the Center does not offer 
traditional therapy for children 
or families, it does offer short- 
term educational and counsel- 
ing services which help fami- 
lies solve common problems 
that are related to their 
children's performance ,at 
school. 



ly unnecessary conferences, 

Guess what? California 
public high school graduates 
are still being accepted in rec- 
ord numbers by top colleges all 
over the USA. The sky definite- 
ly did not fall! Good teachers 
stayed. Others migrated to an- 
other state or more suitable 
careers. 




B , , epa H„ftheMmS"OUH daily of additional ^.^7^ present loca- FuTure growth of the library in 

g Estate^. lawbSop responsibility. And I am not ™ wi „ ^ los / for want of the heart of our town. 

t „ w v»,LrpraUI forgetting the women who had Ri e , can 't think of anyone who 

£SJ ft,™ »nS la •» retu "' t0 "*"■ MUime Many Township residents wou ld stand to lose: Township 

Z?»rt a r^nedidefon household chore, as wives, ^Je the library on a regu- residents would be disenfran- 

rl^ «« y ™ ™»-;*»^*f a - larbasisWtaselves/orc- 

California-Berkeley a few per graders. • d t0 - * to the Borough a U- 

Un?vers?tv Board no one wUhes to acknowledge, p^, now is the time for the 

U 7our re, ffi d >o< proposal " to believe thatthe. Town £ip totakean initiative. 
Bertelev OttaS actionca'n »" the teachers' performance ^ ubrary „ expa „ded as 

work wondere in class - You w . a "' t0 ^Z" recommended by the Trustees, 

work wonders. ^ lhese extia ^ m add)bon an addiUon would ^ built on 

tv^ ou Prin^etnn faces an to "» stress of teaching 125 ^ parking lot, eliminating ap- 

SSS ffiSMKM k£2M3» 

SSfe -Trffpubl.ccomp.ins &^^«2 
veS You? letter columns show that teachers are overpaid. ^ ^ und on wh ich the current 
n^WnTetonLxp^fee" •*"« wnen <*?> , ar< : T 8 library stands. In addition, the 
For example "W? Are Not paid professional salanes they Borol * h has indicated that it 
SshCowT 1 : C^gBelund must suffer abuse retuftung to „„„,„%,„)„ reimbursement 
Meld^Quah^ Education," their classrooms hke returmng for los( ^g ue 

Vietnam vets. Payment for land purchase 

WILLIAM ROUFBERG and for parking revenue reim- 

22 Campbell Road bursement translates into ex- 

Kendall Park penditure by Township tax- 

^ T, „ . payers to the Borough. 

Cutting Family Center v 3 

Won't Save Much Money i suggest that the Township 

To the Editor of Town Topics : offer to solve the: parking prob- 
In its budget the Princeton lem by jouung the Borough in 

eUminating aU funding for the Regional Parking Authority 




Woik Done By Professional 
Mechanics 



PATIOS 



A 

4 



(jReauty 
®Dream$ 



•European Studio 

<Dtvoud1o 

four Total 'Beauty 

facials • 5vjri& • Waxjng 

'Electrolysis • flair Art 

(privacy on Three floors 

9Z4-4910 • *12 Sta te <R$ad • Princeton 



\ 




^TwmSCHOOL OF PRINCETON 

Founded in 1974 

SUMMER STUDY 
JULY 1- AUGUST 2 

Academic Studies 9-11:30 AM 
Specialized Study and Enrichment 12Noon-2PM 

Co-educational First Grade 
Throu^Cone^e^r eparato ry__^ ^ 

grates | 



r H' Private Independent Day School Which Integrates 
Specialized Education With the Challenge ' 



a Traditional Academic Experience so that 

Gifted Young People Who Are Overwhelmed and 

Under-Valued Can Learn to Achieve Their Full Potential 

XK . X X 



Please Direct Inquiries To: 

tnrector of Admissions 

The Lewis School 

53 Bayard Lane 

Princeton, NJ 08540 

609-924-8120 

A Nonprofit Educational Organization, Member of 
the National Orion Society for Dyslexia and Learning Different Persons 



=J 



Today there is a new spirit of 
pride in America. Let's all pray 
that is reflected by a record 
taxpayer vote at the Princeton 
School Board and Budget Elec- 
tion on Tuesday, April 30. 

A ' 'NO" vote will not cut cur- 
rent wages, it will merely cut 
spending for one year. Think of 
it as "a kinder, gentler Proposi- 
tion 13." 

BETH EVANS 
Berkeley, Calif. 



VISIT THE GREAT OUTDOORS 

with wrought iron furniture by...\ 



NOTICE 

Letters to TOWN 
TOPICS "Mailbox" 
should be typed, double- 
spaced, signed and 
received for publication 
no later than Monday. 
No letter will be printed 
without a valid signature 
and address. Letters 
longer than 500 words — 
or letters on the same 
subject — may be edited 
or omitted entirely, at the 
discretion of the editor. 
Letters on subjects not 
specifically related to the 
Princeton area may also 
be rejected. 



The program, which is 
located at Princeton High 
School, is a creative and effec- 
tive school program that is 
staffed in part by volunteers 
and individuals who pay tui- 
tion. The only expense to the 
Princeton School District is the 
salary of the Center's director, 
Dr. Constance Vieland. 

At the School Board meetings 
last week it was claimed that 
the elimination of this program 
would save the School District 
some $70 thousand. In fact, 
since the director of the Center 
has tenure, she will remain on 
the school District's payroll, 
but will be assigned to a job re- 
quiring less training, "replac- 
ing" a lower-paid employee, so 
the true saving for the School 
Disrict will be considerably 
less. 

As a parent of three children 
and as a former client I strong- 
ly support the Center. Certain- 
ly Princeton can afford to keep 
this very valuable and effective 
program. 

JAMES P. LOVE 
Faculty Road 




All Pieces 
20% OFF 

fla 



All weather wrought iron 

available for immediate delivery. 

Choice of several styles and finishes. 



+yn t 



*Aau Jtnteriord 

- Nassauj Wncetor^924-2561 1 Mor r Fri9 ; 5^Thurs 'til 8; Sat 't 



Uncertain Whom to Blame, PHS Students 
Confused and Angry Over Budget Cuts 

To the Editor of Town Topics: 

Princeton High School's hallmark has always been its 
diversity. We have prided ourselves in the fact that we pro- 
vide students with opportunities beyond just a core of Eng- 
lish, history, math and science. But now, due to drastic budget 
cuts, our outlook seems bleak. 

Almost every student may be losing the opportunity to take 
some class next year. There has been serious discussion about 
cutting classes such as Latin, AP physics, auto mechanics, 
German, jazz improvisation and music theory to name a few. 
Students who do not have much interest in subjects outside 
of what is required will probably not have too much difficul- 
ty. But there are plenty of us who once enjoyed the oppor- 
tunity to try things outside of the required courses. People 
who want to focus in on languages, art, or music will no longer 
be able to do so. 

Perhaps hardest hit is the language department. German 
classes at all levels are being phased out of the curriculum 
entirely. In a time when Germany is one of the greatest econ- 
omic powers in Europe, and is destined to grow even further, 
German is an extremely useful language. German students 
also make up the largest fraction of our exchange students ; 
isn't it silly that we, in return, are slashing their language 
off of our course list? But not only German — Latin, Italian 
and Russian may also be affected. 

Hard hit also will be the teachers without tenure. All 
throughout the school system, teachers will have to leave. 
Here at Princeton High that includes our orchestra teacher 
as well as several other younger teachers. It is a tragedy to 
have to let go of the young teachers in our system who pro- 
mised so much for our future. 

All of this has made me, and many other PHS students 
angry, frustrated, and perhaps most of all confused. We can- 
not blame our principal, she doesn't determine the budget; 
we cannot blame the school board, they can't conjure up mon- 
ey where there is none; and we can't blame the government 
because it is under court order to even out the budget of all 
the schools in New Jersey. Well, damn it, I'm mad, and you 
can't very well expect me to just sit still and watch as PHS' 
unique opportunities are eliminated, but it seems that this 
is all I can do. 

INGRID SCHUPBACK 
PHS Student 
11 Pelham Street 



Mailbox 

Continued from Preceding Page 

chised no longer. All taxpayers' 
investment in the facility would 
be returned. 

Borough residents would con- 
tinue to receive the benefits of 
parking revenues, which should 
not decrease if the facility is 
properly designed with regard 
to size, safety and attract- 
iveness to users. The library's 
space would be assured. All of 
us would be able to use the li- 
brary readily and to reaffirm 
the vitality of our central busi- 
ness district. 

When the Library Trustees 
and the long Range Planning 
Committee on Library Facili- 
ties began to study library ex- 
pansion, they described expan- 
sion and parking as two sepa- 
rate problems. The decision 
was made to address only the 
question of library expansion. 
I believe this was a mistake in 
judgment. 

To expand the library as 
recommended, to a size intend- 
ed to accommodate a drastical- 
ly increased number of patrons 
over the next few decades while 
failing to provide for ready ac- 
cess to that library, is a disser- 
vice to all the taxpayers of 
Princeton. 

BARBARA W. FREEDMAN 
138 Valley Road 

Defeat School Budget: 
No Return on Investment 

To the Editor of Town Topics: 

Following is a copy of a let- 
ter I have sent to the Prince- 
ton Regional School System 
Joint Board of Education: 

The increase of 9.3% over 
each of three years you have 
granted to the teachers is un- _ 
conscionable. They are already and cosU are sick d 
among the highest paid sions and neaUh insurance 
teachers in this state^f not the (Imagine getting a prescription 
highest, at over $43,000 average filled for 50 cents We for 
salary. In three years the tne rest y 

average will be over $56,000 be- 

cause compounding results in Little wonder that bom the 
an actual increase of 30.5% Borough and the Township 
over three years nave j ost population; yet more 

Top salaries of over $60,000 schooIs are being bui i t . jw 

will be increased to more than can those of us on fixed in . _ 

$78,000 for a 10-month, 185-day come s keep up with such unfair som e restraint in negotiating 
contract. That's $423.50 per day tax increases? now wit h the over-staffed ad- 

or about $70 per hour for a six- It there were a return on this ministration. The budget needs 
hour day. Additional benefits investment there might be a to be defeated on April 30. 

ALBERT B. MINDLER 
83 Jefferson Road 

Critics of School Boards 
Should Volunteer to Serve 
To the Editor of Town Topics: 

Heaven knows Princeton is 
not a perfect town. And heaven 
and earth likewise know that 
the Princeton Public Schools 
are not perfect. Nevertheless, 
our imperfect town and our im- 
perfect schools offer us a life 
you will never find in any sub- 
division, nor in the schools in or 
near that subdivision. (I have 
lived part of my childhood in a 
subdivision. You may use the 
adjective "luxury," followed by 
a noun of your choice if the 
word "subdivision" offends, 
but you could not pay me to live 
in one ever again.) 

Over a cup of coffee, any one 
of us could tell those who run 
the town and the schools exact- 
ly how things should be improv- 
ed. The trouble is, no two of us 
would have exactly the same 
vision of what should be achiev- 
ed nor how it should come 
about. What our town is, how- 
ever, is a real town, with 
children underfoot, going on 
foot, bicycle, and skateboard to 
school, to visit friends, to take 
part in sports and music, to 
shop, to eat, to do errands and 
to the Library. 

What our schools are, are 
town schools, with the rich 
diversity a town offers, schools 
that enable our children to 
achieve in ways no dollar-to- 
SAT point can measure. ( If you 
are one who believes SATs 
measure anything other than 
the ability to take an SAT.) 

In our imperfect schools we 
have imperfect teachers, 



r 



justification, but show us some 
evidence of excellence in 
education in proportion to the 
costs. SAT scores have been go- 
ing down. Colleges and industry 
are screaming for better pre- 
pared graduates. Where are 
winners of awards such as Mer- 
it scholarships or Westinghouse 
awarasr 
Hopefully, you will show 



FOR SPECIAL OCCASIONS 

Deep plunge Bra-s'lette with low bacj(_ 




^ 



students, principals, ad- 
ministrators, custodians. We 
also have some that in our cur- 
rent world of superlatives we 
should describe as merely 
awesome. 

Those who serve on the com- 
mittees that run our town and 
our schools endure hours of 
meetings, read through hefty 
tomes of documents, and work 
long hours to achieve the com- 
promises that make what ex- 
ists work, all the while working 
to make it better. 

Those who wish to improve 
the system should enroll them- 
selves on one or more of the 
committees that run our im- 
perfect town and our imperfect 
schools, and refrain from 
bashing boards, budgets, 
teachers or children. 

JUDITH GOROG 
85 Moore Street 



Seniors Thank Students 
For Spring Cleanup Help 

To the Editor of Town Topics: 
This past Saturday 10 delight- 
ful young people from Prince- 
ton University helped a group 
of senior citizens clean up our 
yard debris. 

I know there were many 
more than 10 that gave their 
time to help those of us who find 
large yards increasingly diffi- 
cult to manage. 



In this day and age it is so 
nice to know that there are 
young men and women willing 
to volunteer their time to help 
others. 

A heartfelt thanks to all. 

ann munson i n Princeton 

HELEN & CON SCHWOERER 
BERNICE FRANK 

ELEANORA SPAINHOUR 130 EAST 63rd STREET, NEW YORK 



C? \GWIU r . 
PIG ROASTS 

PICNICS • PARTIES • WEDDINGS • DIVORCES 




vJ(9S^»A Me^OiO /^)mJaTHa4 6ou«^Ji- 



May 17, 18, 19 



10021 212-223-8396 516-484-0766 




Clarks® 




Sale 



20% OFF Men's and Women's 



Clarks ^ 

Shoes ^ySsf 



Available in white 32-38 A-B-C-D 

EDITH'S 

the finest in quality & service 

30 Nassau Street. Princeton 

MS Q ™-S : 3Q 609-921-6059 



smu 




FRI-SAT-SUN • APRIL 19-20-21 ONLY 



Clarks Representative Will Be Here Saturday 

Enter Our Free Drawing For a 
Free Pair of Clarks Shoes 



Open Thursday Evenings 'Til 8 



Hulit's Shoes 



142 Nassau Street 



924-1952 



Mon., Tues., Wed. & Sat. 9-5:30; Thurs. 9-8 p.m.; Frl. 9-6; Sun. 12-4 



News of 

Clubs and Organizations 



^ Le Cercle Francais de 
< Princeton will meet at 5 on 
to Sunday in Bowl 1 of the 
jj( Woodrow Wilson School. 
3 Francois Rigolot, Meredith 
J Howland Pyne Professor of 
r French Literature and chair- 
^ man of the Department of Ro- 
. mance Languages and Litera- 
O tures at Princeton University, 
£ will speak on "Montaigne, 
o Voyageur Europeen." 
2 Prof. Rigolot was recently 
a. awarded the 1990 James 
to Russell Lowell prize for co- 
ll editing A New History of 
O French Literature, published 
H in 1989 by the Harvard Univer- 
j sity press. 

O His field of specialization is 
*~ French Renaissance literature 
(15th and 16th centuries), and 
among his many publications 
are books on Rabelais, Mon- 
taigne, and Louise Labe (la 
belle cordiere). 

The lecture is free, and the 
French-speaking public is in- 
vited. 



The War and Recession 
Group will meet Tuesday, 
April 30, at 8 p.m. at the Quaker 
Meeting House, Quaker Bridge 
Road and the Princeton Pike. 

The Rev. Robert Moore of the 
Coalition for Nuclear Disarma- 
ment will provide an update on 
the Persian Gulf Crisis. 



The New Jersey Associa- 
tion of Women Business 
Owners will hold a dinner 
meeting on May 20 at Great 
Tastes in the Princeton Shop- 
ping Center. 

A mentoring workshop will 
be held at 5, followed by net- 
working at 6 and dinner and a 
program at 7. Barbara Lorenz 
will speak on "Image Is 
Everything." 

Guests are welcome. For a 
reservation, call 655-3669. 

The Princeton Singles will 
sponsor a dance from 6 to 8 on 
April 28 at the Hopewell Amer- 




Francois Rigolot 

ican Legion, Van Dyke Road. 
For more information, call 

756-8473. 



Paul Verderosa 
Is Back in Princeton 

Paul has joined 

the staff of 

Ute Fey Hair Styling 

at the 

Princeton Shopping Center 
609-921-1834 



B'nai B'rith Women will 
sponsor an evening of "Music 
and Mirth" on Saturday, May 
11, at 8 p.m. at the Garden 
Room of the Indoor Court at 
Forrestal Village. Featured 
will be the Silver Dollar Singers 
and Political Satirist Sherwood 
Ross. 

For more information, call 
Maxine Gurk at 924-3693. 



LEO 



LEVIN 



200 nassau street 

princeton 

924-5196 




The Princeton Shrine 
Club, River Road, will hold an 
Italian Festival on Sunday 
from 1:30 to 5. Featured will be 
spaghetti, meatballs, salad, 
wine, dessert and cookies. 
Donation is $7. 

"Early Discoveries of the 
Hubble Space Telescope" will 
be the subject of a presentation 
by Donald P. Schneider at 55 
Plus at the Jewish Center on 
Thursday at 10 a.m. 

Dr. Schneider earned his 
bachelors degree from the Uni- 
versity of Nebraska in 1976 and 
received a Ph.D. in astronomy 
at the California Institute of 
Technology in 1982. His prima- 
ry interest is in cosmology, and I": 
ne was one m two sc/eiursui 
who discovered the most dis- 
tant object yet found in space. 
His current work is associated 
with the Institute for Advanced 
Study. 

The Ladies Auxiliary of 
the Princeton First Aid and 
Rescue Squad will meet Sun- 
day at 1 p.m. at the squad 
house, North Harrison Street. 

President Patsy Bianco will 
preside. 

Princeton Personnel As- 
sociation will meet Thursday 
at the Hyatt Regency at noon. 

The meeting's topic will be 
incentive pay. 

The Newcomers Gradu- 
ate Group of the Princeton 
YWCA will have a Coffee Hour 
at the Bramwell House on 
Wednesday, April 24, at 10 a.m. 
Two Russian musicians, Lud- 
milla Shakuro, pianist, and Ig- 
or Hrapunov, violinist, will play 
and sing Russian selections. 



Youth Job Fair 

The West Windsor Chroni- 
cle, the Hyatt Regency- 
Princeton and the West 
Windsor Lions Club will 
sponsor their annual "Youth 
Job Fair" at the Hyatt 
Regency-Princeton on 
Saturday, April 27, from 9 to 
noon. 

There is no charge for ei- 
ther the businesses looking 
for employees or the youths 
looking for jobs. 

Businesses must register 
by Friday, April 26, by send- 
ing their names to; Lions 
Youth Job Fair, 1 Rumford 
Way, Princeton Junction, 
08550. The youths do not 
have to pre-register. 

The Lions will provide cof- 
fee, soda, and refreshments. 
For more information, call 
799-1642. 



HARRY BALLOT - THE SENSIBLE ALTERNATE 
TO OVERSIZED DESIGNER CLOTHING 



NOW - MORE THAN EVER - 
IS THE TIME TO SELECT THE 
CLASSIC SILHOUETTE OF OUR 
SOFT SHOULDER JACKET... 

COMPLEMENTED BY THE 
TRIM LOOK EXPRESSED BY 
NON-PLEATED TROUSERS 



Spring and Summer Suits from 235. 
Jackets from 1 75. Trousers from 47.50 

Sizes 36 short to 48 extra long 




Featuring Eagle Shirts and Liberty Neckwear 



HARR^ggJ, 



For three generations, a specialty store 
for men who enjoy clothing 



20 Nassau Street, Princeton • 609-924-0451 




^ j furniture & accessories 

tl 



:'«tg?H 



J,* 

fjl 
J' ': 







Interior Design Service Available 
2152 Route 206, Belle Mead, N.J. . (201) 874-8383 
OFenMon,Sat.lO-6;Thurs.'til9 




Big birthday coming up? 
Grand! 

Call 
Sandy Maxwell/Music 

for piano, band or keyboard 

609-924-1983 

Music to make you 
feel young again! 



festive 
Horns 



Weddings, receptions, parties, recitals . . . 
Soloists, Duos, Trios, Quartets of French Horns 
plus many other instrumental ensembles 
RICHARD ROSOUNO director (609)924-0285 



Leslie K. Straut 



Jennifer M. Baxter and Mitchell T. Duffy 



Engagements 

Straut-Ward. Leslie R. 
Straut, daughter of Mr. and 
Mrs. Charles B. Straut, 210 
Lambert Drive, to Grant M. 
Ward, son of Mr. and Mrs. E. 
Smedley Ward Jr. of Union- 
ville, Pa. 

Miss Straut, 28, a graduate of 
Kent School, Kent, Conn., and 
William Smith College, receiv- 
ed a master's degree in educa- 
tion from Harvard University. 
She is the editorial assistant to 
the publisher of children's 
books at Doubleday, New York 
City. 

, Mr. Ward, 32, is a graduate 
of The Tatnall School, Wilnv 
ington, Del., and Connecticut 
College. He is a manager and 
sales representative with The 
British Apparel Collection of 
London and New York. 



Baxter-Duffy. Jennifer M. Mr. and Mrs. S. Kenneth Bruce 
Baxter, daughter of the Rev. Jr. of Naples, Fla., and Block 
Harlan and Jane Baxter of Island, R.I. and the late E. 
Elmer, to Mitchell T. Duffy, AlbanVanDeusen, to H.Craig 
son of Bruce and Sandy Duffy, Mohr Jr., son of Mr. and Mrs. 
Kingston Terrace, Princeton Mohr Sr. of Pennington. 
Junction. Miss Van Deusen graduated 

Miss Baxter, a graduate of from Glastonbury High School 
North Brunswick High School, (Conn.) , and received a bach- 
attended Middlesex County elor of arts degree in econom- 
College. She is business manag- ics from Bucknell University, 
er at Market Direct America She is the math teacher and a 
Corp., Princeton. houseparent at the American 

Mr. Duffy, a graduate of Boychoir School. 
Hightstown High School, is a Mr. Mohr, a graduate of 
research laboratory technician Hopewell Valley Central High 
in the food products division of School, received a bachelor of 
National Starch & Chemical arts degree in communications 
Co. He is also a licensed realtor from New England College. He 
with the Mercer County Board is the eastern account ex- 
of Realtors. ecutive fo r Canon Communica- 

The couple plan a February 
15, 1992, wedding at Trinity 
United Methodist Church in 
Ewing. They will live in the 
Princeton area. 



tions of Santa Monica, Calif. 

A September 28 wedding is 
planned in Glastonbury. 

Wenger-Kallfelz. Julie A. I 
Wenger, daughter of James 
and Mary Schulz, County High- 
way 518, Hopewell, and the late 
James E. Wenger, to Andrew 
F. Kallfelz, son of Francis and 
Heidi Kallfelz of Ithaca, N.Y. 

Miss Wenger is a graduate of 
Hopewell Valley Central High 
School and Cornell University. 
She serves as an officer in the 
United States Navy. 

Mr. Kallfelz, a graduate of 
Cornell University, attends 
Boston University School of 
Law. 



MARTY STUNDEL 

PAINTING & DECORATING 



Satisfying the Princeton community for 35 years. 

• Quality & Expert Workmanship • 

"We can accomodate your needs, both interior and 
exterior, throughout the year." • 

Free Estimates 448-5325 Fully Insured 



Qll)itti>Hi> Antiques 

direct from 
THE VILLAGES of MAINLAND CHINA 



OPEN 

everyday 

10 am to 6 pm 



L 




CLOSED 

ON 
TUESDAY 



55 Main Street • Kingston • NJ 08528 

____ 609-924-2743 ■___ 



The U-Store Offers the Best in Music History: 



A September wedding is Van Deusen-Mohr. Linda 
planned. __._ M. Van Jeusen, daughter of 




^924-3320 %, 

61 Main Street 
Kingston, N.J. 08528 

Balloon Specialists Since 1980 
We Deliver 



Enjoy the Diet Center' Difference 



GET YOUR FIRST 

WEEK FREE 

and enjoy the difference 
our flexible program makes! 




The Mozart Compendium: A 
Guide to Mozart's Life and Music. 

H.C. Robbins Landon, ed. Schirmer 

Books, $34.95. 

Also by H.C. Robbins Landon, Mozart: 

The Golden Years. Schirmer Books, 

$29.95. and 1791: Mozart's Last 

Year. Schirmer Books. Paperbound, 

$13.95. 

The Mozart Compendium is a volume of un- 
precedented scope presenting the most recent research 
on every conceivable aspect of Mozart's often trou- 
bled personal life and his always extraordinary musical 
creativity. Renowned musicologist H.C, Robbins Lan- 
don's previous works on Mozart, listed above, have 
been widely acclaimed for their scholarship and 
readability. In this volume, Landon leads a team of two 
dozen internationally recognized Mozart scholars in the 
most comprehensive examination ever published on 
Mozart's life and music. 

Included is a complete list of works, plus individual 
examinations of his most important operatic and sym- 
phonic compositions; a discussion of Mozart as per- 
former (he was considered the greatest pianist of his 
time); a complete survey of all the available documents, 
including family letters, autographs, and first editions; 
a calendar of his life and compositions; a Mozart- 
Weber family tree; and much more. 452 pages. 30 
illus. 



330 North Harrison Street 
Office No. 5 Suite A 
Princeton, NJ_ 



fate 



36 University Place 
609-921-8500 



IT'S NEW 

To Us 




ttatthefamily connection adds 
a special dimension to tiie 
business. 'It is a great asset to 
the business to have so much 
family involvement. We are 
all committed to it." 

Customers who come to the 
bright, attractive showroom 
will find a variety of display 
kitchens and baths, as well as 
catalogues and a multitude of 
tile, cabinet and surface finish 
samples. 

TheBennisonsemphasizethe 
individual attention given to 
customers, in order to help 
them find the right products 
for their needs. "We ask about 
people's life styles. How long 
have they lived in their house, 
do they plan to move, are there 
children and pets?" notes Ms. 
Bennison. 

AddsMr.Bennison, "Before, 
lots of people were moving an d 
were fixing just what they had 
to. Now, people are saying, 
'We're not moving. We want to 
stay and fix up the house and 
enjoy it." 

He adds thatkitchen or bath- 
room remodeling is one of the 
bestinvestmentsahomeowner 
can make. 

Wide Price Range 

Prices depend on the extent 

of the remodeling and the types 

of materials chosen. "Wetry to 

customers started cwtothers their variety of kitchen and bath products , find out people's price range, 

andwetrytofitthepricerange 
to the products, and the prod- 
ucts to the client," explains Mr. 

. , . , „ , - - Bennison. "We have a wide 

can just install a new tub or ,„„„ to attend d,,^ at the „ rice ran „ e , and we can ac- 
toilet. It can be I (creative chal- National Kjfchen * Bath As- commodate different pocket- 
-, mlewant !<.! more Some 'eng^ work within a confined socution, and she expects to books. Also, not everything is 
ren P ta»rporater«S %£-%$£«£ Chens' be,^^ as a kitchen and cust om work, but we^aintain 
roominthenath andtheywant design Dauirooms or (atcnens bat h designer. continued on no«i pw 

IXnt^ThereisdeMtelva m which the space is expanded. . A lot o{ ^ association's 
l£dZ2*£&£iC&' ^Zl^- USt ° meTEBCh guidelinesarebasicengbw- 

ing," notes Mr. Bennison, "in- 
cluding such factors as dis- 
tances between the refrigera- 
tor and stove, etc. We also 
confer with architects on our 
projects, and we have a car- 
penter working for us full time. 
We use licensed plumbers and 
electricians." 



^ Bath & Kitchen Designs 
< Are Custom Remodelers 

2 Kitchen and bathroom re- 
z modeling are very popular 
9 these days, and customers have 
5 a tremendous number of 
^ choices. The variety available 
z'in styles and colors of 
^cabinetry, countertops, fix- 
O tures and appliances is truly 
u amazing. 

5 "We offer well in excess of 
S100 different wood or wood- 
a composition cabinet door styles 
gin different colors, stainings 

8" and styles, and we also have 
. equally as many door styles in 
j laminate, which are very 

3 popular, too," says Mark 
J Bennison, owner of Bath & 

Kitchen Designs at 3175 Route 
27 in Franklin Park. 

Mr. Bennison opened his 
business in 1988 and concen- 
trated exclusively on kitchen 
remodeling. Shortly after, he 
saw the need for bathroom 
work as well, and now the 
business is divided equally 
between the two services. 

"Our 
n^M^ Benn^™aidwe »P»», we can put in a new tub Ms Bennis0Ili who has a 
plains Mr. Bennison, ana we toilet,shower,faucete,etc.,and backeround in art adds that 
enjoy working on both baths ^ L h i' i k Qrwe oacxgrouna in art, «™ "u" 
and kitchens. In the past, Pveitawholenew ook.wwe both she and her brother con 
bathrooms were really just 



"PATRICIAS HAIR DESIGN 

357 Nassau St., Princeton 
(609)683-4114 



sculptured haircuts 
style dry 

sets 
long hair 



color • highlights 

perms 

hair relaxing 

body & 
carefree curl 



Remember Your Secretary! 
Dried Fruits, Nuts & Candies 
> Gourmet Specialties %) 

• Unique Gift Baskets u 
A • Corporate Gift Source y 
'%%< (609) 683-7401 We ship, (t 
32 Main Street, Kingston, NJ y 



CUSTOM QUALITY: "We have a high level of com- 
mitment to quality work and customer service, " says 
Mark Bennison. "To me, the most Important thing la 
to build a reputation based on excellent work. We 
have a whole team of people who care about what 
we are doing. We want to build a relationship with 
people." Mr. Bennison, owner of Bath & Kitchen 
Designs at 3175 Route 27 in Franklin Park, and sales 
manager, Lisa Bennison look forward to showing 



utility rooms, Nowadays, 



9$p 



FAMILY SERVICE 
PRINCETON AREA 



yeirs plus 

The Counseling Center for 
Personal and Family Relationships 

• Personal Psychotherapy 

• Marital/Couple Therapy 
• Substance Abuse Therapy 

• Family Therapy • Group Therapy 

Non-Profit • Sliding Fee Scale 

Nationally Accredited • United Way Supported 

Day or Evening Appointments 



120 John St., Princeton, NJ 
609-924-2098 



169 S. Main St.. Highlslown, NJ 
609-488-0056 



job is unique. 
Mr. Bennison adds that cus- Complex Process 

torn work is Bath & Kitchen Mr. Bennison's sister, Lisa 

Designs' specialty. "The big- Bennison, who is sales man- 

gest thing we offer is our design ager, is especially interested 

service. We take the customers' in the design work. "I really 

information and come up with like working with people and 

a design. We like people to helping them decide whether 

come here and see what we they would like chrome or poI 



CWrW 



Mg&.taWhlfm&e'Mffi 



sions. From that, we'll develop work together. Some people 
computer-generateddrawings. know exactly what they want; 
"We can do as much or as others need advice about the 
little as people want," he con- coordination, what looks well 
tinues. "Within the existing together, etc. There is a lot of 
back and forth communication 



Allan Smith 
Cabinetmaker 

custom furniture a cabinetwork 

lurnilum restoration 



with people. It can be such a 
complex process, with so many 
choices. 

"I think I have the knack of 
knowing what looks well lo- 



,nc uaiimi avui train ami 

kitchen color is white, report 
the Bennisons, and both con- 
temporary and traditional de- 
signs are popular. 

"There is a large selection of 
colors in faucets," says Mr. 
Bennison. "The sleek and more 
contemporary European look 
is popular, and American 
manufacturers are responding 
to it. We carry Kohler, Delta, 



UNIQUE CLOTHING • ACCESSORIES • JEWELRY I 
SIF TS • PRIMITIVE ART • QBJETS D'ART 



(609)466-1 59^ . , 

**• '_ —^^*^ -^ help people visualize." 

Jl |EDCNyTTv€i^ 



gether, ■ she adds, "and I try to Moen and Grohe faucets, and 
L -' American Standard and Kohler 

tubs, toilets and sinks." 




Treasures from around the world i 
delightfully unique boutique, 
just off Broad Street in Hopewell. 
Come visit us soon! 

Storewide Sale 

April 19 & 20 
Up to 40% off 

Tuesday-Saturday 8:30-6:00; Sunday by Appointment 

57 Princeton Avenue • Hopewell N J 
609-466^966 



3^X 



IXZS^IS 




Big, BeautiM Interiors' 
For Every Little Budget 

From classic to contemporary, our designs 
can complement every room in your home. 

Custom Furniture 
Unique Accessories 

Wall Coverings 

Window Treatments 

Carpet and Ceramic Tile 

Draperies and Bedspreads 

Interior Design Consulting Available 

NlarqarcuMiffe, 

INTER 

KinestonrShnp-Ritc Mall 

Ri 27 -Kingston. N" 

(609t 6X34)666 

Monday- Saturday 10-S 
Thursday 10-9 



Popular surfaces for sinks 
and vanities include cultured 
marble and granite, and a new 
line, Swanstone, a Corian 
look-alike. 

"Corian is very popular for 
kitchen countertops," notes Ms. 
Bennison. "It is extremely du- 
rable, and easily repaired by 
the customer, if it is burned or 
scratched. It can be sanded, 
for example. It has a long life 
span and is available in differ- 
ent styles and colors. Because 
it is 100% acrylic, it offers easy 
care. 

"Formica and other lami- 
nates are also available for 
kitchen countertops and bath- 
room vanity tops, and they 
come in many different tex- 
tures and colors," she adds. "A 
lot have the granite or matix 
look. Also, a beveled edge is 
now popular for kitchen 
countertops." 

Ceramic Tiles 

All colors and types of ce- 
ramic tiles are also offered and 
are popular for bathroom walls 
andfloors, as well asfor kitchen 
backsplashes, countertops and 
floors. 

Both wood and laminate 
cabinetry are available, and 
Wood-Mode and Bennison 
Wood Products (Pocono De- 
signs) are carried. The latter 
is a line manufactured by the 
Bennison's father, Jim 
Bennison, In Stroudsburg, Pa. 

The brother-sister team adds 



URKEN. BECAUSE WE 
HAVE THE LARGEST 
SELECTION IN TOWN. 




GENESIS'GA S BARBKQUt 




Weber Grill Demonstration 

Saturday • April 20th • 10:30-2 p.m. 

Representative from Weber will be here 
to answer any questions you may have. 

Demonstrating new and unique 

cooking techniques, using the 

Weber Genesis™ Barbeque Grill. 



fJBtaj BECAUSE THE 
GREAT OUTDOORS CAN 
J*E MADE EVEN GREATER. 

HURKEN SUPPLY CO. 

2^thersp«>nStreet I Princeton. NJ 08540 ■ (609) 924-3076 
wrai ptcna _iohhs hwhw ctok is titrat ram jim tutts s boib. 




It's New to Us 

Continued Iroir Preceding Page 

the quality throughout, at all 
levels. 

"We can do a full remodeling 
job for a five by seven bath- 
room, with new tub, toilet, 
vanity, sink, faucets, and ce- 
ramic tile floor, starting at 
$4200," he continues. "A brand 
new toilet installed starts at 
$275. 

"Also, we try to accommo- 
date customers in every way. 
With a remodeling, we can 
make the room functional in a 
week. Just a tub can take a 
day, and a toilet a half day." 

Bath it Kitchen Designs' 
customers range in location 
from Edison to Lawrenceville, 
including Princeton, notes Mr. 
Bennison. "We especially want 
to emphasize that we work in 
Princeton. We have had a lot of 
referrals and word-of-mouth. 
In fact, someone called the 
other day, who had been re- 
ferred by our very first cus- 
tomer. 

"This is a great business," he 
adds. "It was always my goal 

to have my own business, and ____,. __.__, , . . _ 
we've done nothing but grow. GREEK SPECIALTIES: "We offer authentic Greek 
Seeing it become a success is food. What is so appealing about it is the zlpl It's zes- 
exciting." ty and tasty and has gusto, and our customers real- 
Bath & Kitchen Designs is ly enjoy it. One day, someone came in and said, 'We 
open Monday through Friday 9 visited Greece, and we like your food better!' " 
to 6, Thursday until 8, and Athena and George Manolakis, owners of Mykonos, 
Saturday 9 to 2. the Green restaurant at 22 Witherspoon Street, have 
been serving Princeton customers for more than 1 1 

Authentic Greek Food V ears - 




a few days' advance notice." _ 
Looking back on 11 years of I 
Mykonos success,Mr.andMrs. | 
Manolakis both agree they I 
want to continue running the I 
restaurant and serving the I 
community. 

"We get all types of people 
coming in and ail ages," says 
Mr. Manolakis. "It's a real 
cross section — from profes 
sionals to kids. It's always 
interesting. I said to someone 
recently who came in and was 
reading poetry, 'If you like our 
poetry, you'lllove our eggplant' 
and she quoted us in the paper ! 
We also get a lot of business 
from word-of-mouth. We've 
had people coming from New 
York and Philadelphia who say 
they have heard good things 
about our restaurant." 

Adds Mrs. Manolakis, "I re- 
ally enjoy the appreciation of 
our customers and when they 
tell us they like our food. When 
we see a smile on their face 
and they are satisfied, it makes 
our day." 

Mykonos is open Monday 

through Saturday 11 : 30 to 9 : 30. 

—Jean Stratton 



PC 



609 .921-169(1 1 

WINDSONG 

DISTINCTIVE MASSAGE FOR WOMEN 

SPieediJi + Sf/Uatiu •*• StUOiaxJnn*. + 



Martin Blackman 

LANDSCAPING 

Good Design 

Best Quality Plantings 

Terraces & Walks 

Free Consultation 

683-4013 (Princeton) 



Featured at Mykonos plant on pita bread, mousaka 
"We named the restaurant 



originalityandspecialityofour 
food have made us successful. 



i Aegean Sea. My wife 
Athena, was born in Athens, 
and our parents came from 
Chios. Greece is very special 
to us, and we have tried to offer 
a unique restaurant with au- 
thentic Greek food. We have 
also tried to make it look like a 
Greek village taverna or store 



"We named the restaurant award-winning spinach pie f°°d nave maae us successnu. 

for the Greek island Mykonos special Greek salads and Greek Also our prices are moderate 

in the Aegean Sea. My wife, p i zzaS| including vegetarian, and reasonable. Sandwiches 

areamongthedishesavailable. are normally $3.75 to $4.75, 

"We also have falafel, which salads ? 495 . vegetarian Greek 

onecustomersaidisbetterthan P^s ».35 and up, mousaka 

the falafel they had in Israel," 56.95, spinach pie $4.50, and 

says Mrs. Manolakis. swordfish ka-bob at a special 

price of $3.95. 

"Our Greek pizzas are very „ 

Greekvillagetavernaorstore. popular," she continues, "and Ais0 > he continues, we 

We have a genuine fishing net they are different because they don't cater per se, but we wuJ 

upabove.andweliketoprovide are flaky -we use f eta cheese, make food for parties ana 

a nice atmosphere." . and they are made in a pan, as special occasions. Just give us 

George Manolakis, owner of our pizzas with conventional 
Mykonos at 22 Witherspoon toppings. Other especially 

Street, is proud both of his popular items are souvlnki, a 

Greek and his Princeton heri- special sandwich in pita bread, 
tage. "I am a native chicken ka-bob, made from 
Princetonian," he says. "I was skinless, boneless chicken, 
born and reared here and went charbroiled in pita bread, and 
throughPrincetonHighSchool. fresh swordfish ka-bob in pita 
We are very lucky to have our bread, 
restaurant here. Princeton is "We also have a selection of 
very cosmopolitan, a micro- new items that are very popu- 
cosm of New York, and with i ar , including tabouli salad, 
the University, we get people oa t> a ghannous, bommous and 
from all over." stuffedgrapeleaves. I usefresh 

garlic, olive oil and all fresh 

Prior to opening Mykonos in ingredients. George says my 
1980, Mr. Manolakis was self- food is best, and I think it's 
employed as a professional because I make it until it tastes 
photographer and also worked right. I don't use recipes." 

forPrincetonUniversityPress. 

He was not unfamiliar with the Mrs. Manolakis, whom her 
restaurant business, however, husbanddescribesasanaward- 

since his father had owned two winning chef, was not always 

restaurants.andhehimselfhad s uch an experienced cook. 

earlier tried his hand running "originally, I had thought of 

a luncheonette in Trenton. becoming a journalist/ she 
"Ihadalwayswantedtohave recalls with a smile. "Then I 

myownbusiness,"heexplains, married George and came to 

"and when we saw that this a,,. United States. I didn't re- 
place was available, Athena aUy know how to cook then, but 

and I decided to open a Greek- itcamenaturally. Now, Ireally 

type restaurant, where we en j y it, and I have confidence 

could offer authentic Greek m my work." . 

food. Adds Mr. Manolakis, We 

knowtheoldadagetifyouwant 

"We are presently limited to it done right, you do it yourself. 

take-out service because of a That's why Athena works so 

lease agreement, which pro- hard. She knows she can do it. 

hibits sit-down service," he shementionstomemanytunes 

continues. "But we eventually _ 'I work hard, six days a 

hope to have seating for 50 or w eek, 75 hours a week, but I 

60, with table and counter en joy the work'." 

service, as well as continuing pure i„ gre dients 

the take-out." Another Mykonos specialty 

"We are so busy now," adds Anotner »"J» , * aklava 
Mrs. Manolakis, "thatweknow ta * e n ^ a f e " a st r y "Our 
our customers would like to *M£P»£ J"**, right 
have the seats available We P astne ^ tn 'p Ure ingredients," 
couldprobablydothreeorfour ^'^Va^olakil-Wehave 
times as much business. saysi^ ^^ including cin- 

Business Is Brisk Bam< m, chocolate-covered, and 

Asitis,businessisvery brisk cus tard (g^^^°LJ£ 
at the popular restaurant. ai s0 have Greek-style a ppie 
Customers, including many turnovers, and Mama 
regulars.enjoythetasty Greek L emonia's sesame cookies 
specialties, all made on the ma de from George* mother s 
premises, as well as the down recipe. All our pastries are 
to earth, easy-going atmo- made with Wlo dough, 
sphere. The traditional gyros "All these are *«3* 
sLdwich on pita bread, egg- adds Mr. Manolakis, and the 



ANOTHER ,^. 

ANGLE P 

Hair design for 
men and women ., -, -. ■>== 

• European hair styling ~f*^°k 

• Advanced hair cutting "' - 

• Natural hair coloring 

• Highlighting 
- • Foil frosting 

• Spiral perming ~- % =a,J 

' • Free parking 

609'924«7733 
362 Nassau St'PrincetofvNJ Hours: M-F 9-8, Sat 8-4: 



Hi© 




Right now during our Custom Labor 
Sale you'll save 20% on the finest custom 
labor- when we make your draperies, window 
treatments, slipcovers, bedspreads...even 
reupholstery. 

Add that to our everyday fabric savings 
of 30 to 60% off manufacturer list prices for 



savings that just can't be beat. 

The Custom Labor Sale at Dannemann... 
you don't need to wait any longer. 
Installation & Free Shop-At-Home 
Service Available. 

Hurry-Sale Ends April 21 st. 



wmimm 



Princeton rnnn 

Marketplace, Rt. 27 &518 (201) 297-6090 
10-6Daily; lO-9Thurs.,Fn.; 12-5Sun. 



■Savings based on regular retail prices. 



Intelligent Production Brings 
"Alphabetical Order" to Life 

'■ Michael Frayn's Alphabetical Order turns upside down 

I the world of a dusty, small-town English newspaper office 

i in much the same way that Mr. Frayn's better known Noises 

[ Off overturns the world of a hapless provincial theater 

| troupe. . 

Alphabetical Order is very funny, distinctly British and 

i ingeniously brought to life in the lively and intelligent Prince- 

! ton Repertory Company production playing at the Unitarian 

■ Church over the next two weekends. 

The setting, rendered here in extraordinary detail by 

• designer David Raphel, is the library room of a newspaper, 
' with filing cabinets askew, dusty surfaces covered with 
j papers and clutter everywhere ("What a mess!"). And the 
: central conflict of the play springs up immediately as the tidy, 

■ efficient new assistant librarian Leslie (Susan Garrett) enters 

• and, tentatively at first, starts to set things straight. The ec- 
! centric human elements of this landscape, however, even- 
i tually prove to be even more of an organizational challenge 

• than the filing cabinets! 

Should the universe and its inhabitants be confronted head- 
! on, put straight and pinned down — or simply left to their 
' own lovable, frustrating disorder? The play repeatedly asks 
this question, and, though it gives no clear answer, in the 
Princeton Rep production (in collaboration with the Loaves 
and Fish Theatre Company of Jersey City) the heart of the 
play is Lucy the head librarian, played by Carol Kehoe. 
Delightful Dumrder 
Whatever delights reside in the disorder of life in this set- 
ting, they are lovingly, humanly, irresistibly embodied in Ms. 
Kehoe's Lucy. She is sharp-featured and sharp-witted, always 
on the edge of frenzy but always wise to the arbitrariness, 
the absurdity and the randomness that besiege our world. 
By the end of the evening, you may well want to take this 
character home with you, then install her in your office on 
Monday morning. 

The conflict between Lucy and her punctilious assistant is 
no contest, as Leslie takes over and organizes Lucy's library, 
her lover and her life. What chance have the lovable, dis- 
organized eccentrics of the world against the forces of con- 
trol, rationality, and manipulation? And Leslie even tries to 
make some progress with the newspaper's collection of 
bizarre semi-functional employees — "the unemployable but 
employed" — who wander in supposedly to research articles 
or check quotations. As described in a typically clever Frayn 
exchange: "This paper is unique. There's nothing like it 
anywhere else in the world. " "There was, but it died in cap- 
tivity." 

Though comedy is the prevailing mode here, a certain 
seriousness, a dose of truth, encroaches from time to time 
in unexpected, unguarded moments amongst the hilarity and 

-.honc.Thma? brief, sobering moments^small recognitions of 
mortality, make IneTr mariTana are increasingly /mponant 

as the events of the play take on a more serious tone in 
heading towards the play's puzzling conclusion. 

The sure-footed, entertaining and highly energetic suppor- 
ting cast includes a particularly convincing Larry Swansen 
as the elderly, paternal delivery man; Robert Grillo as the 
practically non-functional, practically mute, bumt-out writer 
who specializes in frog noises; Leon B. Flagg as the suave, 
would-be wit and intellectual full of hot air, paranoia and 
pomposity; Judith Gantly as the sophisticated, lusty, self- 
assured, always unaware and always manipulating widow; 
and Hugo Munday, as yet another of Lucy's suitors, an ea- 
ger, expressive chap who is deaf, either literally or figurative- 
ly or both. These are all appealing, three-dimensional 
character portrayals — human, sympathetic and familiar. 

Lighting design by Rachel Budin and costume design by 
Marie Miller, all under the skillful and painstaking direction 
of Douglas A. Farren, producing director of Loaves and Fish, 
help to create a compelling, deftly tuned production of this 
exquisite play. 

Alphabetical Order will be playing at the Princeton 
Unitarian Church over the next two weekends, Friday and 
Saturday at 8 p.m. with matinees at 2 p.m. on Saturday and 
Sunday, then moving to Jersey City for a run of three 
weekends in May. For further information and reservations, 
call 921-3682. 

— Donald Gilpin 




APflRRJ 

ballet 

Princeton 

Miia Cibbont. Di rt£Kr 
111 Nassau St • 924-Hm 



MONTGOMERY 

TWIN THEATRE 
RT 206 and 518 
(609) 924-7444 



IN PR.NCETON REP PLAY: Susan ^\^^^^Z^^ 

in a scene from Michael Frayn's comedy' Alphabetical uraer piny 9 

at the Unitarian Church. 



7:15,9:15 

Bargain Show: 

Sat. & Sun.: 5:00 

Richard Harris 

The Field r- 



7:10,9:30 

Bargain Show: 

Sat. & Sun.: 4:45 

La Femme Nikita 

French/English Subtitles (R) 




^0$& 



^0^9' 



j0 \ef 



erf***" 05 



&\\n9 



uJg er 



•■#«$*>**■ 



sWfr* 



>t^ 



J&) 









n^k 



Dance 



*t» 



&Rl> 



OH»tt 



$1 



Hi** 



1 VvH»» nias the 



^iK&rt „ sexiest gal "%<&». gftfich, *** 

iporoeVt* e , 00ie n \ cre me deio^ hu bbah-r> uD , D 

W** 6 . w-A Jackson g°»'„ Chicag " 
(jjsu Cartel 



Chicago ir |u 
tSSST "here*- &$ W 



M^Carter 



Charge by Phone 
(609) 683-8000 

01 ll„:.„~:i..Dl n.:-..L 



91 University Place Princeton 

F "" di " 3 h " '"" f ™ i "' <*> *• N ~ "™l *■'• C~«il on !h. M,/O vMmknt o( Stolt . 



"Equus" Still a Potent Psychological Thriller 
In Current Community Players Production 



Peter Shaffer's Equus is a psychoanalytic 
exploration, where the psychiatrist probes in- 
to the tortured psyche of a 17-year-old stable 
boy who has blinded six horses with an iron 
spike. The play becomes a savage contest be- 
tween patient and doctor in which wound is 
traded for wound, protective layers are strip- 
ped away on both sides and the boy's horri- 
fying deed gains mythic, universal impor- 
tance. 

Replete with melodrama, highly stylized 
ritual, pantomime, flashbacks and complex 
psychological characterization, Equus is a 
challenging undertaking for any amateur 
group. To add to the challenge for Princeton 
Community Players, in its current production 
at Broadmead Theatre, is the fact that Dale 



News of the 

THEATRES 



Simon as Dr. Martin Dysart (a role created 
by Alec McCowen and played first in this 
country by Anthony Hopkins) had to step in- 
to the leading role as a replacement with less 
than a week to rehearse before opening last 
Friday. 

Despite Mr. Simon's heavy reliance on his 
psychiatrist's notepad for lines as well as 
notes and some unevenness in the supporting 
players, PCP's Equus provides an evening 
fraught with excitement and provocative 
psychological insight. 

Mr. Simon is a glib and cynical Dysart, con- 
veying effectively his anguish at his state of 
"professional menopause," a stale marriage 
and a stagnant life, his discomfort in en- 
countering this strange boy with the piercing 
personal questions, and his envy of the boy's 
passion, which the psychiatrist must restore 
to normality. 

Great Intensity 

Rob Giardalos brings great intensity to the 
part of the boy Alan Strang, and succeeds in 
making the audience believe in his suffering 
and in his transcendent, maniacal worship of 
equus, the horse-god. 

In supporting roles, Connie Anastasio as the 



nurse. Liz Lawton as the magistrate who 
brings Strang to Dr. Dysart and continues to 
serve as Dysart's confidante throughout the 
play, Eric Ristad as the horse Nugget and 
Patrick Andrae as the stable owner all pro- 
vide competent, intelligent characterizations. 

Lillian Bulanowski and Paul Saunders as 
the boy's parents, who meet with Dysart and 
increasingly reveal their complicity in shap- 
ing their son's aberrations, are less convinc- 
ing, mostly one-dimensional in these difficult, 
complex parts. Julia Nichols as Alan's girl 
friend plays a sensitive, delicate role with 
skill and conviction, overcoming, for the most 
part, what looks like miscasting in a part she 
has outgrown. The supporting chorus of 
horses includes Susan Sherman, Debbie 
Thompson, Patrick Andrae, Kim Krous and 
Lee Smith. 

Director Ted Hoagland has done well in 
focusing on the Dysart-Strang confrontation 
and in overcoming the traumas of working a 
last-minute replacement into a huge role. 
Less successful are some of the ritual scenes 
with the horses, which lack the reverential 
awe, power and mysterious resonance that 
the play demands of them. The large skeletal 
horse-head masks seen in most productions 
of this play were missed here, though the 
Gregorian chants in the background of all 
Alan's encounters with the horses did help to 
create the appropriate effect. 
Action Flows 

The simple inter-connected platformed set, 
designed by Carl Jernstedt, keeps the action 
flowing effectively through its recollections 
and reenactments of past events. 

Some of the psychology of this play — the 
notion of the boy inhibited by his middle class 
environment and overwhelmed by a false 
religiosity and a burgeoning, repressed sex- 
uality, as well as the therapist plagued by 
doubts about the value of his own "normali- 
ty" — may have become cliched or discredit- 
ed over the 18 years since the creation of 
Equus. The play, however, remains a 
psychological thriller and a fascinating piece 
of stagecraft. 

Equus will play at Triangle's Broadmead 
Theatre Friday and Saturday at 8 p.m. over 
the next two weekends, with a Sunday mati- 
nee at 2 p.m. on April 21. 

— Donald Gilpin 



Romantic Comedy Due 
At Hopewell Theatre 

Off-Broadstreet Theatre will 
open Crossing Delancey, a 
romantic comedy by Susan 
Sandler, on Friday. It will run 
weekends through May 25. 

The plot concerns a tradition- 
al Jewish grandmother who 
hires a matchmaker to find a 
husband for her independent 
granddaughter Isabelle. Isa- 
belle must decide between the 
pickle man selected by the mat- 
chmaker or to pursue a rela- 
tionship with an arrogant au- 
thor she has been infatuated 
with. 

June Connerton, who has per- 
formed in various productions 
in the area, will play the grand- 



mother, Bubbie. Catherine 
Rowe, last featured in The 
Taming of the Shrew, win 
play Isabelle. Bob Garguillo, 
singer and musician who was 
featured in Charlie's Aunt, 
will portray the pickle seller. 
Marcia Kasman, a seasoned 
actress, will make her Off- 
Broadstreet debut as Hannah 
the matchmaker. Another 
newcomer to the Off-Broad- 
street stage is Mark SaFranko, 
a writer, who will play Tyler, 
the author who peddles books 
and promises in Isabelle's 
store. 

Performances on Friday and 
Saturday are at 8, with dessert 
and coffee as part of the ticket 
price available at 7. Sunday 
matinees feature dessert at 



Princeton Triangle Club 

r.FNTENNIAL 



1B91 




1991 



The Older The Better 

The Animal Student Written Revue 



Thursday and Sunday. May 2nd and 5th a. 7:30 pm 

Tickets: $10. 12, 15, 17&20 

Friday and Saturday, May 3rd and 4th at 8 pm 

Tickets: $12, 14,15. 17&22 

Performances at McCarter Theatre 

Charge by Phone 

609-683-8000 

McCarter Theatre 91 University Place, Princeton 



THE SCHOOL OF 

PRINCETON 
BALLET . 

lasses in ballet, modern, 

jazz & Spanish dance. 

609-921-7758 



MEXICAN VILLAGE 

Superb 

Mexican Cuisine 

42 Leigh Ave., Princeton 

924-5143 





6avc $8.00 



A Princeton Landmark 




Good-Time Charley's 

Coupon Good Monday* & Tucadaya 

Valia for dinner only, one coupon per two adult entrees. 

Featuring a wide variety of the Freshest (Seafood. 

Veal, Chicken, Great Prime Qib. Pasta Dishes and 

Daily Specials starting at $12.95. 

Route 27 (Main 61), Kingston, NJ » 609/924-7400 



Otter expires April 30, 1991 



Not valid with any other promotion. 



(r- 



1:30 with curtain at 2:30. 

Admission Friday and Sun- 
day is $14.75; Saturday admis- 
sion is $16. There is a senior cit- 
izen discount for Sunday 
matinees. For reservations call 
466-2766. The theater is at 5 
South Greenwood Avenue, 
Hopewell. 

New Play to Premiere 
At George St. Playhouse 

Jewel and the Medicine 
Man, described as a post- 
modern fairy tale, will receive 
its professional premiere 
Thursday, April 18, through 
Sunday, May 5 at the "George 
99" space at the George Street 
Playhouse in New Brunswick. 

Continued on Next Page 



^ 



MASON, GRIFFIN & PIERSON 

COUNSELLORS AT LAW 

announces... 
the encore presentation of 

"Mason, Griffin & Pierson Presents" 

Qp*fJf/ £ Thursday, April 18th 

Ur^ MmMr. . . At 7 p.m. on Channel 8 



Join us for an informative discussion of current issues facing 

municipalities. Guests will be the Mayors of Princeton 
Township, Princeton Borough, and Montgomery Township. 



^ 



fettuccine 



Tortellini 



Angel Hair 



Alfredo 



Marinara 



Scampi 



For Secretaries' Week, 
April 22-26, enjoy 
the Italian classics, 
served in our 
classically 
European atmosphere. 




Scanticon Secretaries' Week Buffet 



$13.95* 

This sumptuous buffet offers fresh 
shrimp, caviar, salmon, full salad bar, 
delicious entrees and, of course, 
ou, special fresh pasta. Enjoy our 
fabulous dessert buffet including 
chocolate fondue. 
Seating from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 



Table d'hote trom $6.25* 
A very special menu will be prepared 
by our award winning chefs, with 
delicious appetizers and entrees. 
Seating from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. 

•Plus tax and gratuity. 

For Secretaries' Week 

Reservations, 

Call 609-452-7800. 



© 



Scanticon 

PRINCETON 

Princeton Forrestal Center 

100 College Road East 

Princeton 

Complimentary Valet Parking 



Hhe <BlackSMvp 

Htfstaumnt 

...A rare and beautiful 
dining experience overlooking 
the Delaware River... 
For reservations call 
(215)321-3339 

proper dress attire please 
Bring your o wn spirits 
1253 River Road • Washington Crossing, PA 18977 




Now Appearing 

The new sounds of Rovin' John Stone 
• Friday & Saturday Evenings • 

l<v CucitKu cftyflicaj 

Chefs Feature 
Daily Lunch & Dinner Specials 

609-924-5666 

Reservations Suggested 
244 Alexander Street • Princeton, New Jersey 




r 



Japanese Cuisine 

Sushi Bar • Take Out 

Home & Office Party Catering 

Princeton Shopping Center 

North Harrison Street, Princeton, N J. 

921-7605 

Open 7_Days a Week For Lunch & Dinner 



f^Q><*H 



My* 



"1 



■L 



'5 00 Off any dinner check 
of SS 00 or more 

Swday-Thureday On* Eipirea May tat, 1991 I 

Cannot be used wui any outer coupon, I _ 




Current Cinema 

Shows and times are subject to change without notice 
GARDEN THEATRE, 924-0263: Theater I, Class Action (R), 
Wed. & Thurs. 7:15, 9:30; Theater II, The Marrying Man (R), 
Wed. & Thurs. 7, 9:15; call theater for weekend times and 
possible change in listing. 

MONTGOMERY THEATRE, 924-7444: Theater I, The Field 
(PG13), daily, 7:15, 9:15, with bargain show Sat. & Sun. at 
5; Theater II, La Femme Nikita (R), daily 7:10, 9:30, with 
bargain show Sat. & Sun. 4:45. 

AMC PRINCE THEATRE, 452-2278: times and titles are for 
Wed. & Thurs only: Theater I, Mr. and Mrs. Bridge (PG13), 
5:30, 8; Theater II, Long Walk Home (PG), 5:45, 8; Theater 
III, Reversal of Fortune <R), 5:30, 7:45; call theater for week- 
end times and possible change in listing. 

MERCER MALL THEATER, 452-2868: Theater I, Dances 
with Wolves (PG13), Fri.-Sun. 1, 4:30, 8; Mon.-Thurs. 12:45, 
4:10, 7:30; Theater II, The Marrying Man (R), 1:40, 4:20, 7:20, 
9:50; Theater III, The Five Heartbeats (R), 1:20, 4, 7, 9:30; 
Theater IV, Awakenings (PG13), 1:10, 3:50, 6:50, 9:20; The- 
ater V, Misery (R), 1:50, 4:40, 7:40, 10; Theater VI, The Hard 
Way (R), 2, 4:45,7:10, 9:40; Theater VII, Home Alone (PG), 
1:30,3:45, 6:40, 8:50. 

AMC QUAKERBRIDGE FOUR THEATRES, 799-9331: The- 
ater I, Shipwrecked (PG), Wed. 1:15, 6; Thurs. 1:15, with 
Goodfellas (R) at 8:15 both days; Class Action (R), Wed. & 
Thurs. 1, 5:45, 8:30; Theater III, The Perfect Weapon (R), 
Wed. JiThurs. 1:30, 6:15, 8:30; Theater IV, New Jack City 
(R), Wed. & Thurs. 1:15, 6, 8:45; call theater for weekend 
times and possible change in listing. 

UNITED ARTISTS MARKETFAIR, 520-8700: starting Fri- 
day, Theater I, Guilty by Suspicion (PG13), 12:45, 3, 5:15, 
7:45, 10, with 12:10 show Fri. & Sat.; Theater II, Mortal 
Thoughts (R), 1, 3:15, 5:30, 7:50, 10, with midnight show Fri. 
& Sat.; Theater II and IV, Out for Justice (R), 12:45, 1, 3, 
3:15, 5:15, 5:30, 7:15, 7:45, 9:30, 10, with 11:45 and 12:10show 
Fri. & Sat.; Theater V, Defending Your Life (PG), 1:15, 4, 
7, 9:40, with midnight show Fri. & Sat.; Theater VI, The 
Silence of the Lambs (R), 1:30, 4:30, 7:15, 9:45, with 12:10 
show Fri. & Sat. ; Theater VII, Sleeping with the Enemy (R), 
1, 3:10, 5:20,7:30, 9:50, with midnight show Fri. & Sat. ; The- 
ater VIII, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles II (PG), 1, 3, 5, 7, 
9; Theater IX, Career Opportunities (PG13), 1:15, 7:15, with 
The Doors (R), 4, 9:30. 

LAWRENCEVILLE TWIN, 882-9494: Wed. & Thurs. only, 
Theater I, Out for Justice (R), 7:45, 10; Theater II, Teenage 
Mutant Ninja Turtles II (PG), 7, 9; call theater for weekend 
times and possible change in listing. 



TYieiitrtzst 

Continued from Preceding Page 

The play is by Kate Waters, 
a nom de plume for Kathryn 
Dougherty Milea, who studied 
playwriting at the Mason Gross 
School of the Arts at Rutgers. 
It is being produced by T-3 Pro- 
ductions of New Brunswick in 
association with The Water- 
front Ensemble, a play devel- 
opment organization of 
Hoboken. 

Jewel is a romantic comedy 
about a somewhat perplexed 
graduate student named Jewel 
Coen who meets and falls in 
love with Duke Stanton, a 
spiritual seeker and carpenter. 
The company is comprized of 
veterans fo the Theatre Arts 
program at Mason Gross. 

Actors Joseph Barbarino, 
Shelley Delaney, Robert 
Osborne and Laura Swanson 
hold degrees in acting. Director 
Arlen Bensen completed an 
MFA in directing, and the 
designers are all alumni or 
soon to graduate. The one ex- 
ception, actor Tim Barrett, 
studied privately in New York 
at the studio of Rutgers pro- 
fessor William Esper. 

Performances begin with a 
preview on Thursday followed 
by the opening on Friday and 
run through Sunday, May 5. 
Show times are Thursday 
through Saturday at 8; Satur- 
day and Sunday at 3; and Sun- 
day at 7. 



..jket information call 
(908) 246-7469. Tickets will also 
be available at the door. 

"Waiting for Godot" Set 
By Princeton Undergrade 

Princeton University's Thea- 
tre Intime will present Samuel 
Beckett's Waiting for Godot 
starting Thursday and running 
this weekend and next at 
Murray-Dodge Theater. 

Labelled by the author as a 
tragicomedy in two acts, 
Waiting for Godot is a bur- 
lesque comedy which delves in- 
to matters of ethics and poli- 
tics. The character Godot is an 
elusive one who never shows up 
to make his appointment with 
the two tramps Estragon and 
Vladimir, whom director Ruth 
Gerson has cast as women in 
this production. 

Although Samuel Beckett is 
best known for Godot, this 
work was one of many which 
led to his being awarded the 
Nobel Prize in Literature in 
1969. He is also the author of 
plays such as Endgame, 
Krapp's Last Tape, Happy 
Days, Footfalls and Ghost 
Trio, as well as several novels. 

Theatre Intime is a student 
run organization that performs 
eight to 10 plays every year in 
Murray-Dodge Theatre. The 
cast for this production in- 
cludes Sara Carbone, Art Di- 
Bianca, Huzir Sulaiman, Hope 
Muoko and Lucy Tay. 

Continued on Nexl Page 



IfS^rffiM 



7 FINE DINING & SPIRITS 
y ENTERTAINMENT 

Middle Eastern & Mediterranean Cuisine 

Open Tue-Sun for Lunch & Dinner 

Presenting Donival Brown on the Piano 

Fri. Sat <S Sun 

For Reservations Call 466-2212 

Corner Routes 31 & 518. Hopewell. NJ 



*•*. 



ftflHUNANM 

157 Witlierspoon Street 

609-921-6950 • 609-921-6959 

FAST FOOD & CATERING 
TAKE OUT ONLY 

H unan & Szechuan Chinese Foo d 
ALSO BUFFET LUNCH $3.25 w/tax 



Monday through Sunday H AM - 



PM- Parking Across Street 



NORTH CHINA RESTAURANT 

36 Witherspoon St., Princeton 



Delicious 
Mandarin 
Dishes 




Hot & Spicy 

Szechuan 

Cuisine 



Open Mon.-Thurs. 1 1 :30-3; 5-1 
Fri. & Sat 1 1 :30-3; 5-1 1 ; Sun. 1 :30-1 p.m. 

Wlwle Peking Duck...only $17.50 Hill Peking Duck.tinlyS8.95 

Reaervatlona Suggested 924-5640 Carry Out 4 Catering 



"After 20 years Charley's Brother finally has a name!' 



Starling March 4th 1991... 




SlyUsh/MordablcFare 



\ow tonne • \ew Menu • iN'ew Experience 



RonlrtMHopeweD, New Jersey (jost off route 31) '60mOI 10 



Day 

or 

Night 

E&is 
PANCAKES! 



*= 



M:- 



SEOUL HOUSE 

RESTAURANT & CATERING 

Genuine Korean Cuisine 
A Truly Unique Experience 

201-249-6989 

The Franklin Mall - 1483 Route 27 
Open 7 days, 1 1:30 am - 10:00 pm 



Buttermilk 
Buckwheat 
Blueberry 



Papaya 
Banana 
Sausage 



Strawberry Choc. Chip 



.and more! -+ 



154 Nassau Street • Princeton 




Theatres 

Continued from Preceding Page 

Performances are Thursday 
through Sunday at 8, April 18- 
21 and April 25-27. Tickets are 
$5 for students and $8 for non- 
students. 

For information and reserva- 
tions, call 258^1950. 

Comparative Lit Major 
Plans Dance as Thesis 

Marilyn White, a senior at 
Princeton University, will pres- 
ent a performance of original 
dance pieces representing a 
part of her thesis for the Com- 
parative Literature Depart- 
ment. The concert will be held 
Friday and Saturday at 8 and 
Sunday at 2 in the dance studio 
at 185 Nassau Street. 

Called The Destructive 
Passions, the works are a com- 
parison of two Romantic era 
novels through dance and are 
in two main sections. The first 
section is inspired by Sten- 
dhal's Le rouge et le noir 
( 1830) and is paralleled with the 
second section, which is in- 
spired by Goethe's Die Leiden 
des jungen Werther (1774). 

A product of the Program in 
Theater and Dance, the per- ^«aC- 

formance consists of solos, jliiPPI 
duets, trios and ensemble 

pieces featuring approximate- CREATIVE DANCE THESIS: Marilyn White, a 
ly 20 Princeton students. The p rin ceton senior, will present a program of or qinal 
S from gr bauet e mSn WO * S inS P ired b V Roman « c era novels by S^eSna 

fance and eariy Reentry f^SS^S* "***"* '" ** ^ S,Udi ° * 185 

court dance. nassau aireet. (Dominique coiien photo ) 

The Destructive Passions marily on the overwhelming 

was inspired by the characters passions of these two young Debut for Women's Co. 

of Julien and Werther, Stendhal men and their resulting deaths. At Crossroads Theatre 

and Goethe s two Romantic The performances are free of 

heros. The work focuses pri- charge. 



mother" in his or her life will 
receive a discount on her ticket. 
Student discounts and group 
rates are also available. 

For reservations, call the box 
office at (908) 249-5560. For 
group sales, call Garry N. 
Johnson at (201) 249-5581. 




CRABTREE & EVELYN 

fine toiletries &food 

53 Palmer Sq. W. 609-924-9388 



<XXXX> 

The Princeton 1 Lfl flll[»9 j 
Shopping Center Ifcass^J M " Thljrs 11 " 9 
N. Harrison St. s^^sdb 

<xxxx> 

RESTAURANT 



921-8646 



Fri-Sat 11-10 

Sun 11:30-8.30 



WANG'S KITCHEN 

JL CHINESE RESTAURANT 

1$P 3221 Route 27, Franklin Park 

' (Formerly A-Kitchen) 

(908)297-2882 • 297-9879 
I RATED •••HOME NEWS | 

The Finest Traditional Chinese Cuisine 




The first work produced by 
Sangoma, the women's com- 
pany at Crossroads Theatre, 
also will mark the close of an 
era for the African American 
theater company as it prepares 
to move to a new home on Liv- 
ingston Avenue 

Sangoma: The Mother Pro- 
ject, the first Crossroads pro- 
duction performed, written and 

produced entirely by >rwmou, 

will begin previews Tuesday 
with opening night on Saturday, 
April 27. As the final production 
of the 1990-91 season, it will run 
through May 26. 

The company takes its name 
from the South African Sango- 
ma, a female diviner/healer 
who is called by the ancestors 
to heal. In Sangoma: The 
Mother Project, the Sangoma 
is the contemporary Hattie 
Mac, "the cleaning lady for the 
planet," who loses her cleaning 
tools and must find them with 
the help of a group of contem- 
porary women. __ 

Sangoma: The Mother Pro- 
ject integrates music, move- 
ment, video and drama for an 
often humorous journey 
through the ages to help women 
find "the missing tools" with 
which to clean their psychic 
houses and empower them- 
selves. Writer-producer Ifa 
Bayeza makes her directing de- 
but with this production. Her 
television credits include "This 
Week in Black Entertain- 
ment," "Black Filmmakers 
Hall of Fame" and "Diff'rent 
Strokes." She wrote and co- 
produced the tribute to Nelson 
Mandela at the Los Angeles 
Coliseum last year. 

This production will be the 
last play Crossroads will mount 
in the century-old former gar- 
ment factory it has occupied on 
Memorial Parkway since its 
founding in 1978. This summer, 
the company will move to a 
new theater presently under 
construction at 7 Livingston Av- 
enue, New Brunswick, next to 
the George Street Playhouse. 

Performances of Sangoma : 
The Mother Project are Tues- 
day through Saturday at 8, with 
matinees on Saturday and Sun- 
day at 3. Ticket prices range 
from $17 to $36. 

During the month of May 
anyone bringing a "special 




SPRING 1991 DINNER 



LES HORS D •OEWRES 
COLD 

BELUGA CAVIAR 

An Ounce of Beluga Caviar Garnished with Egg Yolk, 

Egg White, Minced Onion and Cremefraiche '39 

OAK SMOKED SCOTTISH SALMON 

Salmon Caviar, Cucumbers and Pumpernickel Bread 

Horseradish Cream '10 

ICED REGIONAL OYSTERS 

Mignonette Sauce '10 

YELLOWFTN TUNA CARPACCIO 

Raw "Sashimi" Tuna, Baby Greens, Sesame Crackers 

Wasabi Vinaigrette '8 

SALADS 

SEASONAL GREENS AND LETTUCES 

with our House Dressing '5 
Available with Brie orMonlrachet '1 

FRESH MOZZARELLA 

Yellow Tomatoes, Red Onions, Spinach 
Basil Vinaigrette '8 

SMOKED PHEASANT ' 

Radicchio, Spinach, Vegetable Chips 
Spring Herb Dressing '9 

HOT 

SAUTEED JUMBO GULF SHRIMP 

Black Olive Pesto, Poached Asparagus '9 

PAN FRIED LUMP CRABCAKES 

Marinated Zucchini and Yellow Squash 
Yellow Tomato Coulls '10 

MOUIARD DUCK RAVIOLI 



i r 



SOUPS 



SOUPE DUJOUR 

Price Varies 



BLACK BEAN SOUP 

Sour Cream & Scalllons '4 



h 



ENTREES 

SAUTEED FILET OF BLACK SEA BASS 

Shrimp Filled Wonlons, Beer Battered Scallion 
Cucumber, Cilantro, Tomato Relish '26 

PANACHE OF NORWEGIAN SALMON FILET 

Fennel Poached & Fruilwood Grilled 
Zucchini, Red Potatoes, Vermouth Beurre Blanc '23 

ATLANTIC LOBSTER MEDALLIONS 

Angel Hair Pasta, Rose Sauce '24 

CHARDONNAY POACHED JUMBO SEA SCALLOPS 

Puff Pastry, Parisian Vegetables 
Black Truffles, Saffron Cream '23 

SAUTEED FILETS OF RAINBOW TROUT 

Galeae Potatoes, Medley of Vegetables 
Chablis Beurre Blanc '23 

SAUTEED BREAST OF CHICKEN 

Filled with Cremini Mushrooms, and Oregano 
Bell Pepper Cornbread, Asparagus, Dark Chicken Broth '23 

PAN RENDERED BREAST OF MOUIARD DUCK 

Preparation Varies Dally '21 

"RIB EYE" OF VEAL, FILLED AND SAUTEED 

Tasso, Fontlna and Spinach, Potato Cakes 
Snow Peas, Smoked Bell Pepper Coulls '25 

GRILLED TORNADOS OF BEEF TENDERLOIN 

Herbed Monlrachet and Blue Cheese Crusts 

Shoestring Potatoes, Pearl Onions and Snow Peas 

Burgundy Natural Sauce '24 

FRUITWOOD GRILLED SIRLOIN OF BEEF 

Kansas Medley of Rice, Carrots, Turnips, and Scalllons 
Cracked Black Pepper, Bourbon Natural Sauce '25 

GRILLED RACK OF COLORADO LAMB 

Sweet Onion Souffle, Honey Glazed Vegetables 
Roasted Potatoes, Thyme Lamb f us '27 

Thank you for not smoking pipes or cigars 
go^/fci pool tetxitoHUiom (609) 924-2799 






■■■■ ^----vj-.v-a.* aHMI 






■■■■ ■■■■i-pp m m m &*. 







ffito 



- 'Cosi Fan Tutte' Staged 

< By Westminster Students 

S Westminster Opera Theatre 

g will present four performances 

ui of Mozart's opera Cosi Fan 

* Tutte as the final portion of 

-i Westminster Choir College's 

z Mozart anniversary series. To 

x he presented in The Playhouse 

P on Westminster's campus in 

g Princeton, the performances 

x will be Thursday, April 25, at 8 ; 

c Saturday, April 27, at 8; Sun- 
.day, April 28, at 4; and Mon- 

g day. April 29, at 8. 

o. All of the performers will be 

g Westminster Choir College 

x students. Music director and 

3 conductor is Constantina 

£ Tsolainou, a member of West- 
minster's conducting faculty. 
Lois Laverty, a member of 
Westminster's voice faculty is 
music coach for the production. 
Francis X. Kuhn is serving as 
stage director, and Westmin- 
ster graduate student Antoine 

Palloc is pianist^ REHEARSING MOZART OPERA: Westminster Choir 

Two separate casts will per- College students Klmberly Auman and Brad I Dla- 
form the opera, which was mond, seated, and Ross Stoner standing, rehearse 
completed just one year before "Cosi Fan Tutte' ' to be presented by the Westminster 
Mozart's death in 1791. Consid- Opera Theater In four performances April 25-29. 
ered one of the composer's 

crowning achievements, Cosi Cassatt String Quartet 
Fan Tutte, or "Women Are To Perform New Works 
Like That" in English, centers , „ „„„ K i_ „. 

on twoyoung officers whoare ^T^ --»S=J22S£ 




Westminster Playhouse 
Site of Children's Concert 

The third and final Westmin- 



stung by the statement of a „ 

friend that all women are alike C* 553 " S ^"« *? rtet ln a P™j 

and agree to put their fiancees 8 ram °< newly-composed 

to the test. The result is a bub- works on Tuesday at 8 u, Taplm 

Ming, ironic tale of human Auditorium Fine Hall on the campiL 

fraiUv Princeton University campus. 

y ' The program will include two 

The performances on April 25 works by Princeton graduate 

and 28 will feature Kathy Keith s t u dents: Endscape of Stan 

in the role of Fiordiligi, Jessica Lmk and p er ambulastories 

Flint as Dorabella, Kristine ,„ of Su Lian Tan M r jjnk 

Hurst as Despina, Jeffrey describes his piece as "a tem- 

Prillaman as Ferrando, David fani horizon of emptiness and 

Newman as Guglielmo, and tne impossibility of activity: 



Concert will be presented Sun- 
day at 4 in the Playhouse on the 
Westminster Choir College 



The April 27 and 29 perform- 
ances will feature Kimberly A. 
Auman as Fiordiligi, Miriam 
Allbee as Dorabella, Angela 
Adams as Despina, Brad Dia- 
mond as Ferrando, Ross Stoner 
as Guglielmo, and Mark Daboll 
as Don Alfonso. 

Tickets are $10 for adults and 
$5 for students and senior 
citizens. Tickets are available 
weekdays between 9 and 5 at 
the Concerts Office in William- 
son Hall. 



something wonderful." 

Also to be heard is a newly- 
composed work by Andrew 
Waggoner, assistant professor 
of music at Syracuse Univer- 
sity. The program concludes 
with the String Quartet in F 
Major of Maurice Ravel. 

The concert is sponsored by 
the Department of Music in 
conjunction with The Friends of 
Music at Princeton and is free. 
For further information, call 
258-5000. 



The concert is entitled "Once 
upon a time..." and will feature 
the Westminster Conservatory 
Children's Choir, under the 
direction of Patricia Thel. The 
24-member choir, ranging in 
age from 6 to 12 years, will per- 
form Purcell's Trumpet Song, 
Friday Afternoon by Ben- 

Iha. 



and I 



nrlH 



premiere of contemporary 
composer Otto Henry's Noc- 
turne from Midsummer 
Night's Dream. 

Included on the program will 
be Elma Adams, pianist, per- 
forming Scenas Infantis 
(Memories of Childhood) by 
Octavio Pinto and Lazy Andy 
Ant by Stefan Wolpe, perform- 
ed by Karen Hansen, soprano, 
and Marianne and Peter Lauf- 
fer, pianists. 



The children's concert series 
is designed for the young listen- 
er of kindergarten age and 
above. Admission is $5 for 
adults and $3 for students/child- 
ren and senior citizens. Pro- 
ceeds from the concert wil go 
to the Conservatory Scholar- 
ship Fund. For more informa- 
tion, call 921-7104, extension 
260. 

The Blawenburg Band 
In Concert Saturday 

The Blawenburg Band, the 
oldest town band in New Jer- 
sey, will give a concert Satur- 
day at 8 in the auditorium of 
Montgomery Township High 
School. 

The concert, bringing back 
popular band music from the 
past century, is free and open 
to all. Midway in the program 
will be four classical jazz 
favorites performed by the 
band's Dixieland ensemble. A 
reception with more Dixieland 
and free refreshments will 
follow in the high school lunch- 
room. 

The Blawenburg Band, a 
seasoned performer and com- 
munity fixture in central New 
Jersey, is celebrating its 101st 
year with appearances at civic, 
patriotic, church and nursing 
home events. The band was 
formed in 1890, one of an 
estimated 10,000 small town 
bands then in existence. Like 
other organizations of its type 
and time, it was formed to pro- 
vide a musical setting to com- 
munity events — church 
socials, parades, picnics and 
patriotic gatherings. 

The band has almost 40 
players, including several 
women, and they range in age 
from the teens to the late 70's. 
They come from distant towns 
as well as the local area and ex- 
hibit a similar range of musical 
accomplishment. The director 
is Jerry Rife, professor of fine 
arts at Rider College, and the 
president is Philip Thompson of 
the Princeton University Com 



The 

Composers' Ensemble 

at Princeton 

presents 

THE CASSATT 
STRING QUARTET 

WORKS OF 

Maurice Ravel 
Andrew Waggoner 
Su Lian Tan gs 
Stan Link gs 

Tuesday, April 23, 1991 
8:00 p.m. 
Free Admission 

FRANK E. TAPLIN '37 AUDITORIUM 

in Fine Hall 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CAMPUS 

Sponsored by The Friends ol Music and The Department ot Music 



*The 
Blue 
Door 
Ensemble 




purer—center, iwr. Tnompson 
has been with the band for 
more than a quarter century, 
both as a clarinetist and per- 
cussionist. 

PHS Women's Chorus 
In Concert With Pingry 

The Princeton High School 
Women's Chorus, under the 
direction of William R. Trego, 
director of choral music at the 

Continued on Next Page 



Belle Condon, Oboe Misha Amory Viola 

Renee lolles. Violin Arthur Cook. Cello 

Deborah Cilwood, piano 



IN CONCERT 

Saturday, April 27 at 8 pm 

The Unitarian Church of Princeton 

50 Cherry Hill Road 

Princeton, New Jersey 

Works by: Britten, Hindemith, Schumann. & Brahms 

Admission is Free. 
Reception following the Concert. 



1% 

1 




?% 







Princeton University Glee Club 

Princeton University Chapel Choir 

Walter Nollner, conductor 

Johannes Brahms 

Ein Deutscbes Requiem 

With Soloists and Orchestra 

Andrea Matthews, Soprano 
David Sanford, Bass 

Richardson Auditorium in Alexander Hall 

Friday, April 19, 1991 at 8:30 p.m. 

Saturday, April 20, 1991 at 8:30 p.m. 

For tickers and MoZtt^ > ^T^ ?' 7 ""' <""™ 

- S J,I4S tllr ""Sh April 1 1; 258-5000 after April 1 1 




The friends of 
<M.usic at (Princeton 
April Musical Events 



Joseph Flummerfelt Leads Westminster Choir 
In Dramatic Presentation of Mozart's 'Requiem' 



Wed., April 17th, 8 pm 
Rick Hoffenberg '94, piano 
Works of Schubert, Liszt, 
Bartik & Prokofiev 

Sun., April 21st, 3 pm 

Maltha Elliott, soprano 
Susan Nowicki, piano 

Works of Haydn, Mendelssohn, 
PouUnc, Crumb & VULt-Lobos 



Tues., April30th, 8pm 

Brandice Canes % piano 

Works of Bach, Beethoven, 
Chopin & Granados 



Taplin Auditorium 
in Fine Hall 
Princeton University 

Free Admission 
(609) 258-5000 



displayed some unusual approaches to ritards 
and cadences from Dr. Flummerfelt, all of 
which were followed well by the orchestra. 
The orchestral ensemble provided a solid ac- 
companiment throughout the performance for 
all of the Mozart works, and was comprised of 
obviously top-not cl players, with some espe- 
cially exquisite in .erpretation heard from the 
winds. 

This cor> -,rt featured a number of 
Westminster faculty and alumni (the vocal 
quartet yr the Requiem included four 
Westmir.ter graduates), and three of these 
individvils were featured in the other works 
performed on the program. 

The concert opened with Mozart's Two 
Church Sonatas in C, performed by Joan 
Lippincott on a striking little organ, about 
which there was little information in the pro- 
gram. In the first sonata, although Dr. 
Flummerfelt tried to keep the orchestra down 
in volume, the charm of the organ was almost 
inaudible, but was much more evident in the 
second piece. The intriguing sound from this 
instrument was obviously beyond the limited 
sound of the Baroque portorf/-style organ, but 
with no foot pedals or registration variance 



Princeton 

University 

Concerts 



96th Season 



1990-91 

Gustav 
Rivinius 

violoncello 

Paul Rivinius 

piano 




Works of Brahms, 
Debussy, Webern, 
Beethoven, and 
B. A. Zimmermann 

Thursday, 
April 18, 1991 

8:00 p.m. 

TapUn Auditorium 
In Fine Hall 
Princeton University 

Tickets: $10 
Students: $2 
VISA, MasterCard 
& American Express 
Richardson Box Ofilce 

(609) 258-5000 



The Westminster Choir combined Mozart 
and music education on Sunday afternoon in 
Richardson Auditorium as Conductor Joseph 
Flummerfelt led the 40-voice chorus, with 
piano and organ soloists and orchestra, in a 
performance of three Mozart works. The 
concert was centered around the presentation 
of Mozart's Requiem, a performance made 
more poignant by its memorial dedication to 
Assistant Conductor Frauke Haaseman. 

Conductor Flummerfelt chose rather quick 
tempi for the movements of the Requiem, 
tempi which brought out the fire of move- 
ments such as Confutatis mcdedictis and Dies 
Irae, but which also moved along such pensive 
movements as the Bened ictus. Placing vocal- 
ists in front of Joseph Flummerfelt elicits an 
uncanny amount of energy, and this was quite 
evident in his conducting and the amount of 
vocal energy he subsequently brought from 
his singers. This was a well-balanced chorus, 
with a tenor section especially exceptional for 
college-aged students. The fugal sections in 
tile Kyrie eieison and Hosanna were obviously 
well-drilled, and efficiently clean with the 
accompanying strings. 

Dr. Flummerfelt sought theatricality and 
drama within the movements, especially on apparent, was difficult to place historically, 
the text which translated as "I pray, suppliant However, some delightful possibilities were 
and kneeling, my heart contrite as if it were ev ident with the clarity of sound which Ms. ■ 
ashes: protect me in my final hour." The Lippincott produced, 
ending of Domine Deus also demonstrated a Two members of the Westminster piano 
subtly-built crescendo and dramatic sound, faculty, Phyllis Alpert Lehrer and Ena 
Dr. Flummerfelt has built much of his choral Bronstein Barton, were featured in Mozart's 
reputation on his extraordinary conveyance of Concert in E Flat for two pianos and orches- 
the o cappella sound, and this was quite evi- da. The performance of this work demon- 
dent in his interpretation and conducting of the strated excellent communication between two 
Lacrimosa and Hostiaa sections. If any flaw pianists, between pianists and conductor, and 
in theatrical interpretation of the music could between conductor and orchestra . With strong 
be found, it perhaps may have been that there accompanimentfromtheorchestralensemble, 
was too much space between movements, these two solo artists kept each other in mind 
most significantly between the Kyrie and Dies across the expanse of two grand pianos, as 
irae, which seemed to present the Requiem as they traded thematic material back and forth, 
a series of short vignettes, rather than one Particularly in the second movement, the two 
setting of related texts. pianos often sounded as one, indicating a solid 

The vocal quartet for the Requiem was line of communication. The dual cadences 
comprised of lyrical voices, which worked which closed the Concerto were especially 
well in the context of the classical Mozart. we ll coordinated between the two instrumen- 
Soprano Suzanne Kompass possessed a light, talists. 

easy sound, which added a very nice touch to This Benefit Concert was performed to fa- 
the top of the quartet. Mezzo-soprano Nancy V or the Westminster Choir College scholarship 
Maultsby was very expressive in her interpre- program. The completely full house at 
tation of the music, in a rich and dark (but not Richardson Auditorium was well rewarded by 
overwhelmingly so) voice. Tenor Greg Oaten the high level of performance. The added 
was well in control of the variety of styles touch of dedicating the concert to Ms. 
required of his solo work, and baritone Leon Haaseman, who had given so much to 

Alhert Williams although pcu-Jwipo not quit*, W catrzilnster ***"* C" ""^"^W ~r~*— -J-i- 

fie^o^lrrtheTubflmirum.fitinwellwith wit hin the institution, further cemented 
the lyrical quality of the quartet in other Westminster's role as a leader in choral edu- 
movements. cation in the country 





Kichardson Auditorium 
in Alexundcr Hull 



Princeton University 

Richardson 
Auditorium 
Box Office 

Tickets & Information 
(609) 258-5000 



The Tradename of Quality 

Chopin 'Piano Co. 

'nw World's Finest Pianos 
at the \\ orld's Finest Pricvs'J 

Our sales tax now nnlj V i r /< . 

Kauai ■ WurliUer • VVebcr • Kimhnll • Sojin 

New Jersey's largest Steimvav dealer 



The last two movements of the Requiem 



—Nancy Plum 



The 

Composers' Ensemble 

ai Princeton 

presents 

JANE'S MINSTRELS 

WORKS OF 

Gyftrgy Ligeti 
Anthony Payne 
Matthew King 
Judith Weir 
Katharine Norman gs 

Thursday, April 25, 1991 
8:00 p.m. 
Free Admission 

FRANK E. TAPLIN '37 AUDITORIUM 

PRINCETON UNIVERSITY CAMPUS 

Sponsored by The Friends o( Music and The Department ol Music 



Music 

Continued from Preceding Page 



Maria" by Brahms. "The 
Snow" by Elgar will be accom- 
panied by violin soloist Megan 
Weeder and Jessica Godfrey. 

high school, and Nancianne B. 

Parrella, associate director, The Men's Glee Club will per- 
will perform its annual concert f orm the next section of the pro- 
with the Men's Glee Club of g ra m, and then the two chorus- 
Pingry School, directed by es will join in a performance of 
James S. Little. The concert the Lord Nelson Mass by 
will take place Sunday at 4 in Franz Joseph Haydn, con- 
the Princeton High School ducted by Mr. Little. Members 
auditorium, and admission is f the Greater Princeton Youth 
free. Orchestra, conducted by Con- 

The Women's Chorus will s tantine Kitsopoulos, will ac- 
begin the concert with "Tan- company the two choruses. The 
turn Ergo" by Faure and "Ave so i ists include Paula Florea, 
soprano, Joy Hermalyn, alto, 
Ted Barr, tenor, and Martin 
Hargrove, baritone. 

Officers of the PHS Womens 
Chorus, Erin Kenny. Laura 
Pickover, Robin Norris, Eliz- 
abeth Robinson, Elizabeth 
Abrams and Jane Manganero, 

Continued on Next Page 



A Concert of 

Sacred Choral Music 

by American Composers 




% e gstuo-icWeslioat 

nl 'Tfa.i.viii' Presbyterian Church 

Celetrates 200 Years of 
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

The Mozart Festival Schedule 

Friday evening, April 26, 7:00 pm. Music Room: 

a vocal and instrumental recital of Mozart ,»«, 

given by young musicians ol lie church. 

Saturday evening, April XI. 8:00 pm, Sancutary: 

Por.ormancc'of the C« Jm«ss in C minor P^^ft 

Ajull Choir, The Concerto Soloist; ChanAe, Orchestra wth 

guest vocal soloists. Tickets: $10 

Sunday moving, April 28, 9:30 am, Worskp Service: 

CkuJren and Youth Choi, singing several shorter worts o. 

Morart wilt String Quartet accompaniment. 

Worship Service: 
:i Adult Choir. 

UBIIC 



Dunoay momuig, ™r,.~ — , - . 

Coronation Moss with Orchestra, Vocal Solmsts an 



U. FnJoo anJSunJnu*™** -K^*" 
For more intonation plcsue call: V-""" 1 " 3 . 
Nassau pXeriao Church. 61 Nassau Street, Pnucclon 




Chapel Choir and Seminary Singers 

David A. Weadon, Conductor 

Brenda Day, Accompanist 

Orchestra 



Featuring Bernstein's Chichester Psalms, and works by Aaron 

Copeland, Ned Rorem, Randall Thompson and Charles 

Ives, and music composed by American church musicians 

such as Clarence Dickinson, David McK. Williams Mrs. 

H H A Beach, )ane Marshall, Robert Baker, T. Charles Lee 

and a Spiritual arranged by Hall Johnson 



SOLOIST: Andrea Matthews '78 
will be the soprano soloist when 
the combined Princeton Univer- 
sity Chapel Choir and Glee Club 
present two performances of 
Brahms "A German Requiem" 
Friday and Saturday In Richard- 
son Auditorium. 




Miller Chapel 

Princeton Theological Seminary 



Friday, April 19, 1991 
8:15 p.m. 

Open to the public 
Free admission 



7 Music 

rm Continued from Pr*c**ng Pooo 

• have organized a dinner for the 
,c the two groups, which will be 
■" held in the High School cafete- 
g ria after the concert. 

^Soprano Plans Recital 
gin Taplin Auditorium 

ui The Friends of Music at 

§ Princeton will present soprano 

SMartha Elliott in recital ac- 
companied by pianist Susan 

-iNowicki Sunday at 3 in Taplin 

^Auditorium, Fine Hall, on the 

z'Princeton University campus. 

izThe program will feature 

SK works of the 19th and 20th cen- 

zturies. 

£ The concert will begin with public without admission 
■four German songs of Franz charge. For further infor- 

6Joseph Haydn and continue mailoni caU 258-5000. 

g with the concert aria Jn/e/ice of 

i- Felix Mendelssohn. Next, Ms. 




ing instruments such as the Voices Education Fund 
cuckoo, tambourine, and whis- wi || Benefit from Gala 
tie. The identities of the guest " 



artists will be revealed at the 
concert. 

The homage to Mozart him 



Voices, an ensemble of pro- 
fessional soloists, will hold a 
spring gala entitled "Paris in 
April" on Sunday, April 28, at , 



self opens with the Overture to 4:30 at Stuart Country Day 



Bastien und Bastienne, 
which the theme familiar to 



Martha Elliott 



later generations from which brings vocal perform- 
Beethoven's Eroica Sym- ancestoschoolsinthetn-state 
phony appears for the first area, 
time. Long-credited to Paris in April will begin with 
Beethoven, it is actually a champagne, followed by a per- 
Mozart phrase created for this formance by members of the 
overture. Voices ensemble who will sing 

The program includes A Mu- selections from Leonard Bern- 
sical Jofee, which Mozart stein's West Wide Story^Dn 
wrote for pure entertainment, the Town and Candide. They 



,. and Eine Kteine Nachtmusih. 

n?„ pr S.: S HS.*!* « closes with the Piano Concer- 

to No. 27, with Robert Taub as 

soloist. The Concerto No. 27 

was the last written by Mozart. 

Tickets are available at $18 



Elliott will perform La courte Fina i in Mozart Series C eg V la Ii* 15 senior, and $10 stu- 



ipaille, a song cycle of Francis 



will also perform excerpts from 
Georges Bizet's Carmen. 

Those attending will be in- 
vited to join Voices and direc- 
tor Lynne Ransom in singing 
familiar tunes such as Cole 
,_...,■.■„:,-:,>„„;,■. k „.,,.„„ :„ ., ,, . dent. They may" be "obtained Porter's "I Love Pans in the 

°Poulenc. After intermission B ? «" n aml>er Symphony from the chamber Symphony Springtime.' A buffet will 
she will perform George The Chamber Symphony of office, 497-0020, or from the foUow, during which there will 
Crumb's Madrigals, Book II, Princeton, directed by Mark Richardson Auditorium box of- °e French entertainment — 
assisted by flutist Tara Helen Laycock, will perform the final fice, 258-5000. mimes, puppeteers and cancan 

O'Connor and percussionist concert of its 1990-1991 celebra- dancers. 

Daniel Kennedy. tion of Mozart on Sunday in Tickets are $55 per person for 

Richardson Auditorium at rh ,„„ h m„ c ;„ ir„ c .,„~i contributors, $100 per person 

The program will conclude Princeton University. l-nurcn MUSIC festival f or sponsors. Tickets are 80 per- 

with Bachianas Brasilieras The all-Mozart program in- To Feature Mozart Works cent tax deductible, and all pro- 
No. 5 of Brazilian composer eludes one work by Mozart's fa- in celebration of the ceeds benefit the Voices music 
Heitor Villa-Lobos, accom- ther, Leopold, whose Toy Sym- bicentennial year of Wolfgang education fund. For more in- 
panied by the violoncello sec- phony will feature perform- Amadeus Mozart, the 1991 formation call Voices at 737- 
tion of the Princeton University ances by several of the Prince- Spring Music Festival at Nas- 9383 - 

Orchestra. ton area's leading citizens play- sau Presbyterian Church will 

— ■ — - - feature Mozart's music. The _-, _,. , _-, _. . a . 

festival will be held Friday English Ensemble Set 
through Sunday, April 26 to 28. For Concert in Taplin 
The highlight will be a per- The Composers' Ensemble at 
formance of the Grand Mass in Princeton will present a con- 
C Minor by the Adult Choir and cer ( f newly-composed music 
The Concerto Soloist Chamber by u, e English ensemble Jane's 
Orchestra of Philadelphia on Minstrels on Thursday, April 
Saturday, April 27 at 8 p.m. 2 5, at 8 in Taplin Auditorium, 
Guest soloists include sopranos Fine Ha ij on ^ Prj nC eton Uni- 
Shannon Coulter and Ann versify campus. 
Ackley Gray, tenor David The program will begin with 
Honore and bass-baritone Dancing Day by Princeton 
William Walker. Composed at graduate student composer 
the time of Mozart's marriage Katharine Norman and con- 
to Constanze Weber in 1782, the tinue witn Do „' t Let that 
Grand Mass was first perform- Horse and Serbian Cabaret by 
ed at a Mass in Salzburg to hon- EngIish composer Judith Weir 
or his new bride. and Matters f Art „ tne 

miters mr~tm7 ,-nm-en , r , Une b - v Matthew King. The 
n nw« -i. il program concludes with the 




THE BUCKS COUNTY 

ONE DAY 
ANTIQUES SHOWS 

AT THE EAGLE FIRE COMPANY 

Route 202 and Sugan Road 

New Hope, PA 

Indoors 

65 Quality DEALERS 




10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 

U.S. Roule 202 - 1 mile west ol Delaware River 

Admission $4.00 ($3.50 with Ad) 

Early Buyers 7:00 a.m. - $20.00 

(Includes Continental Breakfast) 

•David M. & Pan J. Mancuso 

Troftssumal Stum' Manaqmwni 
6075 XI. loi llppa Ml. ■*/., <Nsw %*. W i*y« 
D (zis) 734-oSs* n 




SUMMER 

IS COMING 

LOSE WEIGHT 

and Finally Keep It Off 

Ut 17-22 Iks, jg 6 weeks 




Rathy has lost 79 lbs. through an excellent diet by 
working with Princeton Weight Loss. She is thrill- 
ed with the way she feels! Through our effective 
maintenance program, this is the last diet she will 
ever need. 

She has now kept off- the weight for 2'A years' 

Call Joyce Hofmann for a free consultation 
Princeton Weight Los* Center 

601 Ewtng St.. Suite C-l 
Princeton Professional Path 



$10. There will be an open re 
ception in the Assembly Room 
to meet the artists immediate- 
ly following the performance. 
Other Festival events include 
a vocal and instrumental recit- 
al of Mozart's music on Friday, 
April 26, at 7 p.m., as well as 
two morning worship services 
on Sunday, April 28. The 
Children and Youth Choir will 
perform several short works by 
Mozart with String Quartet ac- 
companiment at the 9:30 a.m. 
worship service. The 11 a.m. 
worship service will feature 
Mozart's Coronation Mass 
performed by the Concerto So- 
loist Chamber Orchestra of 
Philadelphia, the Adult Choir 
and guest soloists, soprano Sue 
Ellen Page, mezzo-soprano 
Lindsey Christiansen, tenor 
David Honore and bass- 
baritone William Walker. The 
Friday night recital and Sun- 
day morning services are open 
to the public free of charge. 

The music festival at Nassau 
Presbyterian Church is made 
possible through the support of 
concert-goers and patrons. 
Those interested in supporting 
the Festival may do so in one of 
four ways as either a Festival 
Supporter at $30 per person, a 
Festival Patron at $50 per per- 
son, a Festival Benefactor at 
$75 per person, or as a Special 
Friend at $100 or more per per- 
son. 

At the invitation of Kenneth 
MacWilliams, Festival pat- 
rons, benefactors and special 
friends will be invited to a pre- 
concert buffet dinner at the 
Woodrow Wilson home on Li- 
brary Place on Saturday, April 
27. This historic landmark was 
built by Ellen and Woodrow 
Wilson, who closely supervised 
every detail of its design. For 
further information or to make 
a donation call Nassau Presby- 
terian Church, 924-0103, Mon- 
day through Friday, 9 to 5. 



Horn Trio by Hungarian com 
poser Gyorgy Ligeti and Eve 
m'ng Land by Anthony Payne. 
The concert is sponsored by 
the Department of Music in 
conjunction with The Friends o(, 
Music at Princeton and is free. 
For further information, call 
258-5000. 



NEED AN EARLY COPV of TOWN 
TOPICS? You pan buy one at our of- 
fice, 4 Mercer Street, Wednesday mor- 
nings after 9 and al Princelon 
newsstands after 1 1 




WESTMINSTER 
CHOIR COLLEGE 

24-HOUR CONCERT INFORMATION (609) 921-2663 



School. The event will benefit 
Voices music education fund, 



HALS STEREO &VIDEI 



Call us 

about our in-home 

consultation 



ALT. RT. 1 & TEXAS AVE. 
LAWRENCEVILLE. NJ 08648 



609-883-6338 



THE RITE OF SPRING 



THESTUARTR MLDLINitfEMOKlALCONCEIJTj^ 

GUnkt-Overture to Russian and Ludmula _ 
Tchaikovsky- Serenade for Strings 
Stravinaky-TAe Rise of Spring 




PRINCETON UNIVERSITY 
ORCHESTRA 

Michael Pratt, Conductor 

APRIL 26 and 27 




OUR CLIENTS 

HAVE THE BEST 

PROFILES 

AT FAMIIYBORN, 
1 -WBHAVE THEM All BV FOCUS 

Our family of doctors, mUuives, nurses, 
counselors and birth assistants are dedi 
cateel to the health)- growth oj women 
Beginning uitli the transitional conflicts 
Med in adolescence and through each 
stage of a woman's life, FamiMxm, Ins 
your needs in focus Ourconprelxiisi,e 
services baix earned the confidence of 
women of all ages, each with her own 
dislinctwe profile. 
Adolescent Health Care Services 
Sexuality Education Workshops 

^■Conceptual Health Care 

Family Planning and Counseling 

Complete Gynecological Care 

Prenatal and Obstetrical Care 

Childbirth Education 
Birth Center or Hospital Births 

Insurance Reimbursed 
US Healthcare & KCHP Accepted 
"^osedby He IQ Dtpt of Health 




««"■ Vemn-t Ham 
*> Wiggins sine, ft.,., m ^ 




CALENDAR 
Of the Week 



Wednesday, April 17 

10:30 a.m.: Readings over 
Coffee, Herbert McAneny 
reading from We Walked 
Then Ran by Alice Mugger- 
ditchian Shipley; Public Li- 
brary. 

3 p.m.: Men's baseball, 
Bucknell vs. Princeton; Clarke 
Field. 

4:30 p.m.: Colloquium on 
liberalism opens with panel on 
"Liberalism and the Pas- 
sions"; Dodds Auditorium, 
Robertson Hall. Also at 8, 
"Liberalism, Conservatism, 
Radicalism: What are the 
Essential Differences Today?" 

5 p.m.: Borough Housing 
Authority; Borough Hall. 

7:30 p.m.: Candidates' Night, 
Princeton Regional School 
Board; John Witherspoon Mid- 
dle School cafeteria. Sponsored 
by the League of Women 
Voters. 

7:30 p.m.: An evening of 
storytelling by Greta Sander 
for adults and children age 7 or 
older; Public Library. Free 
tickets required. 

8 p.m.: Alfred Brendel, 
pianist; McCarter Theatre. 

8 p.m.: Samuel Beckett's 
Waiting /or Godot, Theatre In- 
time; Murray-Dodge Theatre. 
Also on Friday and Satuday at 



Thursday, April 18 

2 p.m.: "Thinking About the 
End: Fin de Siecle and Apoca- 
lypse," colloquium on the ap- 
proaching end of the century; 
Betts Auditorium, School of Ar- 
chitecture. Also on Saturday at 
9:30. 

8 p.m.: Musical, Betsey 
Brown, McCarter Theatre. 
Also on Friday and Saturday at 
8, and Sunday at 2 (final per- 
formance). Singles party 
follows Friday performance. 

8 p.m.: Gustave Rivinius, 
cello, and Paul Rivinius, piano; 
Taplin Auditorium, Fine Hall. 
Friday, April 19 

12:30 p.m.: Gallery Talks, 
t "Pre-Columbian Art," Gillett 
Griffin, curator of Pre- 
Columbian and Native Ameri- 
can Art; Princeton University 
Art Museum. Also Sunday at 3. 

6:30 p.m.: YMCA Singles' 
Sports; YM-YWCA. 

8 p.m.: Westminster Concert 
Bell Choir; Bristol Chapel, 
Westminster Choir College. 

8 p.m. : Susan Sandler's com- 
edy, Crossing Delancey, Off- 
Broadstreet Dessert Theatre; 5 
South Greenwood Avenue, 
Hopewell. Doors open for 
dessert at 7. Also on Satuday at 
8, and Sunday at 2:30 with 
dessert at 1:30. 

8:30 p.m.: Brahms' Ein 
Deutsches Requiem, Prince- 
ton University Chapel Choir 
and Princeton University Glee 
Club directed by Walter Noll- 



S o R n iC SaCd°a n y %?%*""■ , »!»»■= **«ri« and lutenis. 

-g^SSSiS S&Sffifi&E 

ing Fusion, Workshop, and 

<>at.. r H. a •, Hard Bo P Ensembles. 

9 a I M u r ' P m : Re g ional Health 

s a.m.. Mens Heavyweight Commission; Borough Hall 

Crew, Harvard and M.I.T. vs. 

Princeton: Carnegie Lake. Tuesday, April 23 

9 a^n to 3:30 p.m. : Mercer Township Recycling Pickup 

10 a.m. to ll: M a.m.: Music KolaU "' New ^oVk^Time, 

&^^P-^=-i££i 

tenan Cooperative Nursery her articles- p,,w,v t -k 
School; Nassau Presbyterian 7 Sf ' U JS LlbraI T- 
Church rres °yienan 7.30tol0p.m.PnncetonFolk 

.n, m ,.,„„ D , i lance Group, international 

Fu-eCompanyHall.NewHope, 8 p.m.: Regional School 

ton University Art Museum. 8 p.m. : Preview, Sungoma 

w w P i i, „ D ,° rot 1 y in The Mother Project, written 
Wonderland, Unlimited Poten- produced and performed by 
tial Theater Company of Very Women's Comrany at Cross 
Special Arts New Jersey; roads Theatre 320 Memorial 
Franklin Villagers Barn Thea- Parkway TNew BrunTwTck 
tre, 475 DeMott Lane, Somer- Previews'also on WedTsday 
set. Also at 3. and Thursday 

2 p.m. : Men's lacrosse, Har- 
vard^ vs. Princeton; Finney Wednesday. April 24 

2 p.m.: Highlights Tour; J;™?™'- p °<*ry reading, 
Princeton University Ar ? amu t H««ney reading from 
Museum rtrt his work; McCosh 10, Princeton 

8 p.m.: Westminster Singers Umvers "y <* m P™- 
directed by Alan Crowell; 
Bristol Chapel, Westminster 
Choir College. 3 : 30 p.m. : Creative Theatre 

8 p.m.: Blawenburg Band Presentation, Teanech to 
spring concert and reception; Tuckahoe and Timbuctoo; 
Montgomery Township High Pur/lic Library. Free tickets re- 
School, Burnt Hill Road, Skill- quired, 
man. 4:3 ° P-m.: Public lecture, 

8 p.m.: New Jersey Sym - " The FBI v - The First Amend- 
phony Orchestra, Neal Stuhl ment ." Richard Criley, Na- 
berg, guest conductor, Jonr lional Committee Against 
Browning, pianist; State Thea Repressive Legislation; Bowl 
tre, 19 Livingston Avenue, New 6 ' Woodrow Wilson School. 
Brunswick. 7:3u p.m.: 50-Something 

Singles; YMCA. 
Sunday, April 21 7:45 p.m.: Euripides' The 

9 a.m.: Earth Day Cleanup Bacchae, Princeton Universi- 
along Delaware & Raritan tyP'ayers; Blau-Arch. Alsoon 
Canal sponsored by Whole Frida y and Saturday at 7:45. 
Earth Center and Princeton 8 P-m. : Vienna Chamber Or- 
University student volunteers; ehestra, State Theatre, 19 Liv- 
meet at Washington Road and '"gston 
towpath. Followed by Festival, Brunswick. 
1 to 6 p.m., Turning Basin 
p ar k Friday, April 26 

2 p.m.: Laser and Sunfish Gallery Talks, "Indian 
racing; Lake Carnegie. Sculpture," Virginia Lock- 

3 p.m.: Chamber Symphony wood, docent; Princeton 
of Princeton, Richardson University Art Museum. Also 
Auditorium. Sunday at 3. 

3 p.m.: Martha Elliott, 6:30 p.m.: YMCA Singles' 
soprano, with Susan Nowicki, Sports; YM-YWCA. 
piano, Tara O'Connor, flute, 8 p.m.: Princeton University 
and the cello section of the Orchestra; Richardson Audi- 
Princeton University Orches torium. Also on Saturday at 8. 
tra ; Taplin Auditorium. 8 p.m.: Susan Sandler's com- 

edy, Crossing Delancey, Off- 
Monday, April 22 Broadstreet Dessert Theatre; 5 
Borough Recycling South Greenwood Avenue, 
7:30 p.m.: Township Com- Hopewell. Doors open for 
mittee; Valley Road building. d f,?ert at 7. Also on Saturday 
7:30 p.m.: Israeli folk dan?- at 8, and Sunday at 2:30 with 

ing, everyone welcome, ^.^ ^.m. Tom Griffin's The 
ners and experienced, Jewish P,^ Frank]in 

Center. 



Villagers Barn Theatre, 475 
DeMott Lane, Somerset. Also 
on Saturday at 8 : 30 and Sunday 
at 7:30. 

Saturday, April 27 

Litter Day 

Trash Pick-up Along Delaware 

& Raritan Canal 

8 a.m. to 4 p.m.: ShadFest; 
Lambertville. Also Sunday 
from 11 to 6. 

11a.m. to 5:30 p.m.: 17th An- 
nual New Jersey Folk Festival ; 
Eagleton Institute lawn, 
George Street, New Brunswick! 

2 p.m.: Highlights Tour; 
Princeton University Art 
Museum. 

8 p.m.: Opening night, 
Sangoma: The Mother Pro- 
ject, written, produced and 
performed by Women's Com- 
pany at Crossroads Theatre; 
320 Memorial Parkway, New 
Brunswick. Also on Sunday at 

9 p.m.: Cafe Improv; Arts 
Council. 



PMNCETON AI&POUTEB 



Executive Service to Newark & JFK Airports 

(609) 587-6600 



Thursday, April 25 



Avenue, 



New 






American Handcrafted: 

JEWELRY- POTTERY- GLASS 

WOOD • TOYS • CHIMES 

.Jk Come See Our Crafts From 

'" -•.,.„.■ More Than 160 Artists 

Pictured are 14K Gold Rings 

by David Virtue, N.H. 

Free Gift Wrapping • Shipping via UPS • Ample Parking! 

MONTGOMERY SHOPP.NG CENTER-RT 206.ROCKY H.LL.<609> 924-3355 
Mon-Wed, Fri 10-6 • Thurs 10-fl'Sot 10-5»5un 





(t%£ 



) 



•uropnn skin cars iak>n 

(609)79*9620 

nails ■ facials ■ waxing 



HunterDouglas SHADES 

MINI 
BLINDS 



DUETTE* 




50% 

OFF 

withjree 
measuring 

Standard windows only 



The Interior Design Center 
thatdoes UalL..stnce 1957," 



75 Princeton Ave. • Hopewell • 466-0479 

Opetv Monday-Friday 8:30 - 6, Saturday 9-4 



White 
Lotus 
Futon 



From Sofa to Bed 

in Seconds 
No lumps, no springs, 
no bar in your back - 
just 100% pure cotton 
comfort. Oak, maple and 
cherry frames, handmade futons, 
mission furniture, pillows and more! 



Princeton 

6 Chambers St. 
Princeton, NJ 
08540 (609) 497-1000 
Mon-Sat 10:30-5:30 
Thurs til 8 

New Brunswick 

191 Hamilton St. 
New Brunswick, NJ 
08901 (908) 828-2111 
Mon-Fri 11-6:30 
Sat 10-5:30 




Pick A Direction... 
Then Pick Up the Phone!! 

Whether you're traveling by boat, 
train, plane or car, we can get you 
going, and keep you going, in any 
direction you choose. 

With one phone call, we'll make 
your reservations, organize your 
maps, rent your car and prepare 
your travelers cheques fee free. 
And you thought we were just 
Emergency Road Service! 



609-683-4400 

<®> 

AAA Central New Jersey 

Seven Convenient Locations: 

Headquarters: 

3 AAA Drive, Robbinsville 

Edison • Marlboro • Mount Laurel 

Ocean Twp. • Montgomery/Princeton • Toms River 



AAA T^ A,™, *»«= ■"■■■I* » ™"*™ ■"" "0-™*"" Cam ««««. p**™» =*l»i» « 



t'«.J.X**-.JL.l~«A.k« *.!.* 



Pcytoi 



PEYTON ASSOCIATES 

Realtors 

Princeton 609-921-1550 • Pennington 609-737-9550 

exclusive affiliate of 

GREATESWES 

an inteunatxxxA baokm netovoak 



WE'RE LISTING! 

(SOMETIMES BEFORE THEY ARE ADVERTISED) 



..... 






■ 


^V -jftll 


m? *> 




,. t j 


. e' 








K 
















liil 

Ik' *m 






/ 






■ar V 1 



PRINCETON... such a great value in this conveniently located center hall 
colonial. This gracious older home has plaster walls, curved ceilings and 
moldings, but with modern touches like central air, modern bathrooms, 
Andersen windows, whirlpool tub and wet bar. Old and new come 
together splendidly... $295,000 




PRINCETON... in one of the loveliest neighborhoods, close to town 
center, but with a definite country feeling, this marvelous brick residence 
offers an abundance of space, both inside and out. There are 2 fireplaces, 
Palladian windows, recessed lights throughout, marvelous professional- 
ly landscaped grounds and beautiful pool... $795,000 




HOPEWELL... truly one ot the best values of the spring market on Nelson 
Ridge Road with Princeton address! A center hall two-story with 4 
bedrooms, including luxury master and lots of storage, living room, fami- 
ly room and great room, formal dining room, fabulous deck and more. 

Offered at... $310,000 



HOPEWELL... we are pleased to offer this smashing contemporary in 
Elm Ridge Park. The setting is spectacular and inside there is living on 
two levels with wonderful atrium room, an exceptional European kitchen, 
family room, 5 bedrooms and 3 baths, 3 fireplaces, and much more... 

$399,000 




PRINCETON... Charm and convenience are found in this totally updated 
condominium. One block from Nassau on a quiet street near a park, the 
location is terrific. There are 3 bedrooms, fireplace and the third floor has 
expansion possibilities. Great in-town living... $225,000 




GJnna Ashenfelter 
RuthBry 
Pat Cahlll 
Vicky Campbell 
P.M. Comlzzoll 
Mary Elite Cook 
Amy Curtis 

343 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 08540 
(609) 921-1550 



HOPEWELL... "Willow Run" Farm... on a quiet country road in a beautiful 
estate section, this 19th Century farmhouse is located on 20 acres The 
onginalhouse has been restored and the property offers wonderful views 
Pool, pond, barn and more. 

Offered at... $1,195,000 



of the Harbourton hills.. 



Lynne Durkee 
Sheila Graham 
Cathy Hegedua 
Gerry Henneman 
Maggie Hill 
Marjorie Jaeger 
Ellen Kemey 



Lincoln Kemey 
Pat Light 
Ella Mackenzie 
Jeen Martin 
Meg Michael 
Dmcllla Mlhan 




Judy Stier 
Bob Tyler 
Robin Wallack 
Joy Ward 
Judy Weiss 
Beverly Wlllever ■ 



TOD PEYTON - BROKER 



134 South Main Street, Pennington, NJ 08534 
(609) 737.»ssn 



Peyton 



PEYTON ASSOCIATES 

Realtors 
Princeton 609-921-1550 • Pennington 609-737-9550 

exclxjsirje affiliate of 

GREAT ESTATES 

an JntennatiorxA baoten nefjxxxik 



WE'RE LISTING 

(ALL TYPES ALL LOCATIONS ALL PRICES) 




PRINCETON... this house has everything... marvelous location — 
beautiful grounds — intriguing and flexible floor plan. The rooms are 
spacious — 4/5 bedrooms, 4 full and 2 half baths, family room overlook- 
ing sensational heated indoor pool with dressing room and half bath. You'll 
find recreation room, darkroom, possible maid's quarters and more... 

$695,000 




PRINCETON... this handsome contemporary with a smashing new ad- 
dition by Bob Dunham has a wonderfully convenient in-town location. It 
has 3/4 bedrooms, 2V 2 baths, brick walkway, 2 decks, wet bar, recessed 
lights, hardwood floors throughout. On a professionally landscaped \ol 




PRINCETON... in the western section this brand new residence is hand- 
some in style and impeccably detailed. Grand entrance hall flowing into 
formal living areas... magnificent great room, fabulous master suite as part 
of a four-bedroom complex, huge basement, 2-car garage. Designed and 
built by Russell Baltzer, it is offered at... $1,275,000 




PRINCETON... lots of house — lots of value. If you are looking for a large 
house on a big lot that is reasonably priced, we have the answer for you. 
Only a short distance from Carnegie Lake, there are 5 bedrooms, 2Vi 
baths and wonderful grounds. $289,000 




i %r'. .... t^ i i I i r • ; * ' * " 

PENNINGTON .. This luxurious 2/3 bedroom condominium boasts 1873 

sauare fee™ " v ng on two floors. Its private end-unit location provides 

r usulCS for maintenance-free living , coupled with ranqu ^ 

yet will within a short walk to Main Street. Offered at... $181,000 




PRINCETON . handsome colonial with spacious rooms and gorgeous 
grounds on a quiet street in an executive area. There are 5 bedrooms, 
3 baths, family room with fireplace, eat-in kitchen - there s even a wonder_ 
ful heated in-ground pool. Super house for a family... $539,000 



Qlnna Ashenfelter 
RuthBly 
Pat Cahlll 
Vicky Campbell 
F.M. Comlzzoll 
Mary Elite Cook 

343 Nassau Street, Princeton, N J 08540 
(609) 921 -1 550 



Lynne Durkee 
Sheila Graham 
Cathy Hegedue 
Gerry Henneman 
Maggie Hill 
Mar|orle Jaeger 
Ellen Kerney 



Lincoln Kerney 
Pat Light 
Ella Mackenzie 
Jean Martin 
Meg Michael 
Drucilla Mlhan 



Cathy Nemeth 
Mary Osthelm 
Angela Romano 
Jane Schoch 
Robin Shear 
Carol Stewart 



Judy Slier 
Bob Tyler 
Robin Wallack 
Joy Ward 
Judy Welea 
Beverly Wlllever 



TOD PEYTON - BROKER 



1 34 South Main Street, Pennington, N J 08534 
(609) 737-9550 





Open Artists' Studios 
< On April 27 and 28 Tour 

rj Two afternoons of visiting ar- 
z tists' studios have been 
S scheduled by the Princeton Ar- 
i tists Alliance. The tours will be 
./held Saturday and Sunday, 
z April 27 and 28, from noon to 5. 
z ~ The sites are Benarde Studio, 
o 6 Thomgate Court, handmade 
uj paper demonstration and prints 
§} by Anita Benarde; Harvey 
5 Studio, 245 Jefferson Road, 
a Robert Harvey, sculpture; 
gHockaday Studio, 111 Fitz- 
£ randolph, Susan Hockaday, 
O drawings, collages, and hand- 
z made paper; 

* 

£ Also the Johnson Studio, 231 

Snowden Lane, collagraph 

demonstration, Margaret K. 

Johnson, prints and paper- 
works; McVicker Studio, 47 

Montgomery Road, Skillman, 

oil painting, monotype and 

photocoloring demonstrations, 

Charles McVicker, oil paintings 

and water-colors, Lucy Graves 

McVicker, watercolors, mixed 

media, and monotypes, and 

William Vandever, photo- 
graphs; and Scott Studio, 332 

Burnt Hill Road, Skillman, 

etching demonstration, Joanne 

Scott, paintings and prints, Pat 

Martin, paintings, Mike "INDIAN SCULPTURE" will be the subject of a gallery 

Ramus, paintings, and Bar- talk by docent Virginia Lockwood at The Princeton 

bara Watts, watercolors. University Art Museum on Friday, April 26, at 12:30 
Tickets for the complete tour „ m The talk will be repeated on Sunday, April 28, 
are $5 per person. Children are JJ 3 Admi ssion Is free. 
free. A portion of this will be "'" f 



versity, and ETS. She has par- 
ticipated in numerous invita- 
tional and juried shows. 



Exhibits 

The investment firm of 
Tucker Anthony, 10O Nassau 
Street, will show the 
photographic work of Sue 
Stember during the month of 
May. 

The public is invited to view 
the exhibit during regular busi- 
ness hours. 

The Williams Collection's 
spring garden show will be held 
at La Paix Sculpture Gar- 
den, Trenton, from April 30 
through June 25. The garden 
will be open Tuesdays from 11 
to 5 or by appointment by call- 
ing Leni Morante at 921-1142. 

The exhibit will feature work 
by Richard Gerster, Gyuri 
Hollosy, G. Frederick Morante, 
Ernest Schlieben, Peter Vanni, 
Glenn Zweygert, and others. 



c 



LeSdortsac 



TRAVEL STORE 

luggage 

totes 

handbags 

accessories 

26 Witherspoon St. 

Princeton 

(609) 924-6060 



ro=aoci 
MAIN STREET II 
FRAME SHOP V 
Picture Framing H 



MAIN STREE1 
FRAME SHOI 

Picture Framing 
Dry Mounting 
Needlework 

Call 
924-2333 

195 Nassau Street 
t Thompson Couit) 







i(ln Thompson Court) ru 
riRlNG"fHIS~AD~| II 

"rndlid 



cldyphernalici 

Fine Handcrafted Pottery 
Nina Gelardi and John Shedd 

200 Washington St, Rocky Hill • 924-6394 • Mon-Sal 10-5 



Art Restoration 

Oil Paintings 
Gold Leafing of Frames 



Lawrence 

A»T<- frame Cjallery 

Lawrence Center / Lawreneevllle 
Mon -Fri. 10-9, Set. 10-5 / B83-2401 



i portioi 
contributed to the Public Li 
brary. 

Artwork will be for sale. 
Tickets will be available at all 
the studios. For more informa- 
tion, call 737-1049. 



John Marin, Reginald Marsh, 
art historian Ronny Cohen on Gia 'Keeffe, Maurice 
Wednesday, April 24, from 12 to prend , and wilIianl 

12:45 p.m. Watercolor artist ^^ 
_ Reeve Schley will give a water- The GaUery is located in the 
color demonstration on Wed- Bl . istol . Mvers Squibb Phar . 
nesday, May 1 during the same maceutica ', Group H eadquar- 
time period. Both events are ters on p^ nf^ee miles 
Talk Demonstration Set '^JSSJC consists of an -uth of Prmceton. 
lo ne in with Exhibit informal survey of watercolor 

The Gallery at Bristol-Myers as a medium and a selection of Anml!1 | w:„~. Arts chnm 
Squibb will hold two exhibit- works by 20th-century Ameri- ™ "" u ~ , *" ™" on " w 
related events during the cur- can watercolorists. It will be on scheduled at Carrier 
rent exhibition, Watercolor view through May 27. The ar- The Ninth Annual Fine Arts 
Across the Ages with Selected tists include Milton Avery, Show, sponsored by the Carrier 
20th-century American Works. Charles Burchfield, Charles Foundation Auxiliary, will 
There will be a gallery talk by Demuth, Helen Frankenthaler, begin with a gala opening on 

Friday, April 26, from 7 to 11. 
The event, to benefit the Car- 
rier Adolescent Endowment 
Fund, will be held in the Ad- 
ministration Building at Car- 
rier Foundation, Route 601, 
Belle Mead. 

The exhibit will be open to the 
public ($2 admission) on Satur- 
day and Sunday, April 27 and 
28, and May 4 and 5, from noon 
to 4 p.m. 

Opening night will feature a 
hot and cold buffet. Tickets to 
the opening are $25. 

The show will feature the 
work of more than 85 artists 
working in oil, watercolor, 
print, sculpture, and other 
media. 

For more information, or to 
reserve a ticket for the opening, 
call the Auxiliary office at (908) 
281-1561. 



I 

i 



Hopewell 

Frame 

Shop 



Gallery/Framing 
Wall Design 

TVs take your art 
to heart" 



I 




'&W&0& 




Bring us the keepsakes from your fondest memories. 
We have plenty of great framing Ideas to showcase 
the meaningful times of your life. So what you have 
in your heart, you can hold in a frame. 

Do It Yourself or Custom Framing. 



\i 



frames & framers 

mercer mall • it 1 & quakerbrldge road 
lawreneevllle, nj 08648 • (609) 452-1091 



Lindenfeld to Teach 
Fiber Collage Workshop 

Fabric artist Lore Lindenfeld 
will teach a one-day workshop 
at Artworks on Saturday from 
9 : 30 to 3 : 30. The class, or fiber 
collage workshop, will be held 
at 45 Stockton Street. 

The workshop will focus on 
creating an assemblage of con- 
trasting designs in color and 
textures using solid and trans- 
parent fabrics and stitchery, 
combined with drawing. Com- 
positions will be based on 
geometric designs and natural 
forms. Most materials are sup- 
plied. Students should bring a 
ruler, scissors, and lunch. Pre- 
registration is required. For in- 
formation and registration, call 
394-9436. 

Ms. Lindenfeld's work has 
been featured in solo exhibi- 
tions at Rider College, the N.J. 
State Museum, Rutgers Uni- 



PHOTO 
HAVEN 

l-hour color prints 

Pennington 

Montgomery 

Lawrence 

i Convenient Locations 



PEOPLE 

PHOTOGRAPHS 

John Simpson 

924-8996 




HERITAGE BRASS ARTISANS 

Interior - Exterior 
Antique Reproduction Lighting 

All hand-made here In our 
workshops from pure solid 
brass and copper using tradi- 
tional skills and tools. 



• Outdoor lighting 

• Interior Fixtures 

• Landscape lighting 
► Floor lamps 

• Street lamps 



• Table lamps 

• Wall sconces 

• Chandeliers 

• Post lights 



202 North Union Street, Lambertviile, NJ 08530 

focron from Niece Lumber} 

609/397-8820 

Store Hours: Mon - Sat 10 a.m. - 5 p.m.; Sun. 12-4 p.m. 




Builders — Interior designers 
Inquiries welcome 



MONMOUTH PARK 




ANTIQUE 

EXPO 

SATURDAY ~ APRIL 20 ~ 10AM to 7PM 
pVSSI^ ~ APRIL 21 ~ 10AM to 6PM 

EARLY BUYERS - SATURDAY 9AM to 10AM ~ $20 
The Monmouth Park Grandstand Exhibition Hall 

200 EXHIBITORS 



All Periods - All Specialties 



E^Oce/n"^ ? 1 £ <k * Ex " 10S G » rden St »te Parkway To Rt 36 
East - Oceanport, NJ > General Admission 5.00 - With this Card 4.00 



Both Tiger Lacrosse Teams See Title Chances Fade; 
B SLS^S!i SttU on Target, and Softball Wins Ivies 



vogue last week at Princeton 
University. Themen'slacrosse 
team was ranked second in the 
country, and the women's team 
held a four-game winning 
streak. But when the sun set 
Sunday night, bats and gloves 
were flying high while the la- 
crosse teams saw their hopes 
for Ivy titles left in the mud. 
' Color last weekend brown, 
as in the Brown Bears, for the 
lacrosse teams. The third- 
ranked Brown men's lacrosse 
team marched onto Finney 
Field and knocked off the sec- 
ond-ranked Tigers (8-2, 2-1 Ivy) 
by a 7-5 score. The Bears , 



SPORTS 




convincing 107.5-55.5 win over 
Yale. Princeton will participate 
in a four-team meet at 
Georgetown this weekend. The 
women's track team (0-1) fell 
to the Elis, 73-70, and will also 
race at Georgetown this 
weekend. 

The golf team, after winning 
the one-day Montclair State 
Tournament early last week, 
put forth a miserable showing 
at the Penn State Invitational 
last weekend. The hosts won 
the meet, with Princeton fin- 
ishing 36 strokes behind, good 
for 24th in the 30-team field. 
Freshman Steve Dana finished 
42nd overall in the two-round 
tourney. The Tigers will com- 
pete in the Ivy Championships 
in Bethpage, N.Y., this week- 
end. 



The volleyball team fell to 
George Mason in straight 

currenUyundefeated,faceonly SWINGING INTO FIRST PLACE: The hittinq of senior P™*' 1M1 ' -^ ^ '"if 
oneserious challenge between slugger Richey Nash, three hits, toSZSfSSS* Tg&SaT&iSi 
themselves and an Ivy League and two RBIs in the doubleheader sweep of Navy qualified for the four team 

Tg£ b *&£?£'&S tZ^l'.^l he ' Ped Pri " Cet0n remain ,ied for «* SLtefluU Won" 
den^R I ^ "" P' ace w "h Army. IDomM , m c<1 „ an , r> . „,,„„ PrbMmim) ships at Rutgers-Newark this 

' " continues to impress in its de- second place Princeton (4-0) Sato j? y L^u e £ 0n ,. i L s ?5 ded 

TheBrownwomen'slacrosse £nse of the national title. ZltaSSaSS^to "t^ mSsSo s?ttm 

team also steamrolled a P rmc «' " s ' av ?d unbeaten to a sound, 7.6-second victory. lo i 1 T d Tl! enSitlfa^ 

Princeton squad Ranked f^^^team^cfwith 6 ^ "^a™" * *• SStSMhSSihriS 

eighth in the country, the Tigers H? a three-team race with seconds to fimshm the runner- a t Finnev Field The second- 

(M, 1-2 Ivy) fell, 11-6, to the Harvard and Cornell .last .Sat- up slot. The Lightweights row SuSSnS? came intoflTe 

ninth-ranked Bears and will ^^SkSc^^tt^ " **" ** ^^ g-eloSgl'n^oUd 

.need senous help in order to poweriw unmson Dy z m sec- triumDh over Nn 11 Penn 

■"- ' ; ' on^whdetheBigRedfimshed Themen-s tennis team (11-3, £» *%%£*£. T&J IZ 



qualify for the NCAA Tourna- 



ment. 10 seconds behind the victors 5-0 EITA) faced a pair of wiiout ^tarttng soDhomore 

It's only mid-April, but the ft Carnegie Lake. Princeton's powerhouses last weekend and 3 e ld er C Zo S 

baseballteam (10-11, MEIBL) time of 6:22 98 also broke Uie emerged with a split. The Ti- ™a funTor mlafie^sGreE 

sits atop the Eastern courserecordbyaireeseconds. gers dumped Navy, which had WauSdSMM stxellwere 

Intercollegiate Baseball Prmceton faces Yale m Derby, beenundefeatedinleagueplay, H^bM bv Ss The thS 

League standings for the seo- Conn., this Saturday. 7-2, last Saturday. The follow- S&ST^wWte, 

ond straight week. Princeton Men's Crew Struggles mg day Princeton lost to non- stru tted into Princeton with a 

split ajtwinbill with three-time The men's crew team (2-2) JS agu t J?,. Virginia, 5-4. perfect 7 _ mark| i 00 king to 

defenauigchampionPenn.then continued to struggle last Sat- Though, the Mountaineers are avenge a crucial overtime loss 

swept Navy, 6-1 and M. urday. On Carnegie Lake, Penn ^'j," iate Tennfs* W to ** Tigers last SeaSOn ' 

The softbal^eam (19-8, 7-1 ££u5f "J** *^JL S ciation, tleir victory gives ^men Now Ranked 5th 

Ivy) could not have asked for piston came in second at * em 1 a . n , u PP er hand " receiv - ll _ w l en M wa 5 said ^ done . 

aftv more from rookie hiirler £ ^ f . i™, m secona at tag a bid to the NCAA Tourney the Bears had won, 7-5. re- 

any more irom rooKie nurier 5.45 64 wm]e Columbia m 6 M av princeto n travel s to co.<i.u«< «, ».< p... 

iJisaMoort.NotonlydidMoore gtouehtuD the rear with a time ? y ' l ™^ ton J avl " s «> 

fan shatters hntsheeamered Drou ^ lu PiD er ?= rwlln "' anle Army on Friday, then hosts 

S2W.M carnegTe ^kf™.^" D ^ aam m . f^T * 

Tigerssweptapairofweekend gSInd MffSatufdT 4 ^^T.^ad'toJSS 

doubleheaderstocapturetheu- It was a nght battle in the , 4 ' "Sea^ flf fvelr las 

eighth Ivy League title in nine lightweight crew race in %3E*to *&££££* 

J*™*'.* . . • ....-_ L**<*. N.Y., last Saturday. ^^^^^0 



BRIDGE AUTO BODY, INC. 




GOODtfYEAR TIRES 



Rt. 31, Pennington, N.J. • 737-1200 

1 Mite North of Pennington Market 



What you 
seed is what 
you get 




Continued on Next Page 



Plant Burpee, hybrid flower 
and vegetable seeds 



PRINCETON HARDWARE 

Princeton Shopping Center 



924-5155 



Ithaca, N.Y. 
Speaking of championships, The duel, however, was be- n^„ r 'S, C !'°, n H™IrrfVie 
the women's crew team (54) tween Cornell and Rutgers for Dartmouth and Harvard this 



Sports Fans! 

I BET YOU 
DIDN'T 
KNOW 



John 
Bernard 

STURHAHN, DICKENSON & BERNARD 

that we are moving to 14 





One of the most 
unusual nicknames for 
any team in big league 
baseball is the 
"Dodgers" — and did 
you ever wonder how 
that nickname came into 
being? ... The name was 
first applied to the 
Dodgers when they were 
in Brooklyn, years before 
they moved to Los 
Angeles ... It started 
when trolleys were in- 
troduced in Brooklyn, 
and citizens there were 
called "trolley dodgers" 
because so many trolleys 
traveled down their 
streets ... Brooklyn's 
baseball team was then 
named the "Trolley 
Dodgers" ... After a 
while, they shortened it 
to simply "Dodgers". 



Main Street, Kingston, 
NJ (the building next to 
the Canal across from 

the Wine Press). 

» • * 

Here's an oddity ... 
Broker's Tip won the 
1933 Kentucky Derby — 
but never won any other 
race before that, or after 

that! 

* * * 

Now that Chicago's 
original Comiskey Park 
has been replaced, which 
is the oldest existing ma- , 
jor league baseball 
park? ... 2 parks are tied 
for the honor ... Both 
Fenway Park in Boston 
and Tiger Stadium in 
Detroit opened on the ex- 
act same day in 1912 — 
and both are now the 
oldest parks in big league 
baseball. 



weekend. 

The men's track team evened 
its Ivy record at 1-1 with a 

EIBL Standings 

Saturday, April 13 

Penn 6 Princeton 

Princeton 9 Penn 5 

Army 2 Harvard 1 

Army 5 Harvard 4 

Navy 1 Cornell 

Navy 8 Cornell 3 

Yale 9 Columbia 5 

Columbia 16 Yale 4 

Dartmouth 3 Brown 2 

Brown 6 Dartmouth 1 

Sunday, April 14 

Princeton 6 " Navy 1 

Princeton 9 Navy 5 

Army 4 Dartmouth 1 

Dartmouth 5 Army 4 (10 inn.) 

Penn 3 Cornell 2 (9 inn.) 

( Cornell 6 Penn 5 (11 inn.) 

Harvard 8 Brown 1 

Brown 6 Harvard 4 



Princeton 

Army 

Yale 

Penn 

Navy 

Dartmouth 

Columbia 

Brown 

Harvard 

Cornell 



W 
6 
6 
6 
6 
5 
2 
3 
3 
1 
1 



Pet 
.750 

.750 
.600 
.500 
.500 
.500 
.375 
.375 
.250 
.167 



I bet you didn't know . 

Sturhahn, DiCKenson 

& Bernard 

INSURANCE SPECIALISTS 

14 Nassau St. • 921-6880 

I >aes x»i< >»x xaK >»k mbc xs& «*k *Wf vsec »x x«s. z» 



% 



Saturday, April 20 

Princeton at Cornell 

Army al Yale 
Brown at Columbia 
Dartmouth at Navy 

Harvard at Penn 
Sunday, April 21 
Army at Columbia 

Brown at Yale 
Dartmouth at Penn 

Harvard at Navy 



MERCER COUNTY RESIDENTS 

HOUSEHOLD CHEMICAL WASTE 

CLEAN-LP DAY V 

will be held 

SATURDAY, APRIL 27, 1991, 8 am-2 pm 

at the MERCER COUNTY (John T. DEMPSTER) FIRE SCHOOL 

Bakers Basin/Lawrence Station Roads, Lawrence Twp. 

ALL MERCER COUNTRY RESIDENTS, WITH 
PROOF OF COUNTY RESIDENCY, MAY PARTICIPATE 



WHAT TO BRING: 



• Household Cleaners 

• Pesticides 

• Insect rep e 1 1 a n is 
•Auto & Household 

Batteries 

• Weed Killer 



•Paint Thinners 

• Rust Remover 

• Pool Chemicals 

• Flea Powder 
•Chlordane 

• Chemistry Sets 



• Photographic Chemicals 



• Used Motor Oil 
•Stain 

• Herbicides 

• Disinfectants 
•Acids & Caustics 
•Oven Cleaner 

• Paints (oil ba 



ed) 



In Addition, Used Motor Oil is Now Accepted! 



00 

T 



NOT BRING: 



• Agent Orange/2, 4,5 

• Unknown Materials 

• Unidentified Materials 



• PCBs 
•Explosives 



• Gas Cylinders 

• Medical Waste 

• Radioactive Materials 



YOU MUST PRE-REGISTER! 

Call the Mercer County Improvement Authority, 695-1200, ext. 45 
by April 25, 1991 with the types and quantities of the acceptable 
materials listed above requiring disposal. All materials must be 
in original containers with original labels intact. Up to 50 pounds 
(liquid or solid) will be accepted per household. 

Sponsored By 

The Mercer County 

Improvement Authority. 

PRE-REGISTRATION REQUIRED! 
Call (609) 695-1200, ext. 45 

Not open to businesses, industry or schools. 




* Sports 

_> ContmuM Iron Preceding Page 

Ck 

*■ placing Princeton as the No. 2 
h-'team in the country. Unless 
3 Brown blows a game down the 
£ stretch, the Bears will capture 
J the Ivy title and receive one of 
- four first-round byes in the 13- 
< team NCAA Tournament in 

3° May. Princeton, now ranked 
z fifth, will need one of the four 
o teams ranked ahead of them — 
j North Carolina, Brown, Johns 

. Hopkins and Virginia — to lose 
^ in order to qualify for a bye. 

. Brown controlled the tempo 
§ throughout the contest last 
j- Saturday, slowing down the 
u pace and clamping down 
2 Princeton's dominant 

a attackmen on defense. After a 

8' slow start, the Bears vaulted 
_ out to a 5-1 lead going into 




satile Grant was a third-place 
finisher in the high jump with 
a leap of 6-0. 

Idris Magette of PUS won the 
400 in 54.3 where Hun's Court- 
ney Fitch was second in 55.9, 
and Andrew Callegari was an- 
other first-place winner for the 
Little Tigers with a winning 
time of 2:09 in the 800. PUS won 
the 1,600 relay by four seconds 
over second-place Hightstown. 

The Little Tigers also claim- 
ed a number of second-place 
finishes to forge its victories. 
Finishing second were Matt 
Pickens in the 1,600, Dan Noon 
in the 3,200, Joshua Kanter in 
the 110 hurdles, Toma Pala- 
mino in the shot put and Bren- 
don Miller in the discus. 
Pennlngroth Dominates 

As expected, Princeton 
High's outstanding sophomore 
Alley Penningroth dominated 
the girls' competition. 

Penningroth won both the 100 
and 400 hurdles in 17.8 and 1 : 14 
and the shot put over teammate 
Ruth Williams. Penningroth's 







'{oxninq 
i >on Co. 



oioex & jBalLo 

Balloon Bouquets • Parly Decorating 

Gift Baskets & Other Novelties 

Nassau Street • Princeton 

WE DELIVER 497-2090 




I With Waller, the Tiger 
c faceoff specialist, on the side- 
-lines after he re-injured his 
hamstring early in the game, 

and Marro, his backup, not SOFTBALL BACK IN FAMILIAR SPOT: Sophomore winning toss measured 36-1, 
dressed, Brown won several pitcher Stacle Bonner helped the Princeton Softball Williams' best was 32-9V4. Wil- 
second-half faceoffs, main- team regain the Ivy title It lost a year ago when the liams also finished second in 
Tigers swept Yale and Brown last weekend. The tl- the discus and javelin. 
t.e is the team's eighth In nine years, r^^ ,»,», ^Td by gtsfown'sUz 
The loss snapped a four- Navy. Sophomore Matt Iseman Meyers in the anchor leg of the 
game winning streak for the (2-1) hurled a complete game, 4x400 relay. Meyers sprinted 
Tigers, whohad thrashed West scattering seven hits while the final 80 yards to edge Pen- 
Chester, 14-2, last Thursday, striking out six. Sparked by ningroth and win the event for 
Next up for Princeton are Ivy senior right fielder Richey the Rams, 4:28 to 4:30. It was 
contestsatPenntomorrowand Nash's RBI double, the Tigers a key to Hightstown's win. 

at Yale on Saturday. broke open a 1-1 game with 

Tied for First In Baseball Ave runs to the sixth to win 6-1. Heide Applegate of PHSwon 

' the discus with a toss of 99-0, to 

,.„„„-, . The baseball team has cured The 6-1 score carried over nip Williams by nine inches. 
Field. The Crimson, who face '^of <t>e fkttwg disease into the nightcap, foUowing an Taking seconds for the Little 
Brown today, have struggled ?, pIag ^„, ?"i",u I <**% Princeton rally which Tigers were Dana Litvack in 
since reaching the NCAA nrst seven aiBLdoublehead- pro ducedasextetofrunsinthe the 1,600, freshman Sadie Ryan 
quarterfinals last season. ers last season. This year, the ope ning frame. Freshman in the 3,200 and Ariel Goet- 

Tigers have developed anew center fie ] der a^ Samv/a y i tinger in the 400. 

The women's lacrosse team P a " ern: split on Saturday, sophomore second baseman Princeton was forced to corn- 
fell to ninth in the polls following »««? »» j™y. "inceliin Dan Puskas and Hayes all de- pete without the services of its 
its loss toBrown Saturday. The did just that last weekend hvered two-RBI hits to the in- two best distance runners, 
against Penn and Navy at ntog to help senior Rob Fedder Christina Graves and Cara 



Merrill Lynchn 



Merrill Lynch Pierce Fenner & Smith, Inc. 

194 Nassau Street • Princeton 
(609) 924-7600 

A breed apart. 



taintog possession of the ball 
and keeping Princeton from 
climbing back into the game. 
Freshman midfielder Brian 
Tomeo and junior middle 
Highley Thompson scored in 
the third quarter to cut the 
lead to 5-3, but Brown scored 
the first two goals of the fourth 
period and held on for the win. 
The Tigers will look to re- 
bound against Harvard (2-5, 1- 
1 Ivy) Saturday at Finney 



Tigers were tied with the Bears, 
4-4, at halftime, only to see 
Brown explode for seven sec- 
ond-half tallies for an 11-6 vic- 
tory. Senior defender and tri- 
captain Marge Adams was the 
lone bright spot for the Tigers, 

» tt ih iwts Ihreo of the six 



Princeton goals. 



Clarke Field to stay tied for (1 .f, aIon g to ^ triumph. 

first place with Army at 6-2 Princeton will host Bucknell 

Ten games remain for both Thursday at Clarke Field. The 

squads within the league. n^gers return ^ E rn, L action 

Against the Quakers, tnis wee kend with a lone 

Princeton had to deal with the doubleheader at Cornell on 

hotbatofPennoutfielderDoug Saturday 

aianvtlle, a probable first- ■"■""""J'- , . 



Boyles. 



IF YOU DON'T READ TOWN TOPICS, 

how will you keep up with Ihe news? 



BOWDEN'S 

FIRESIDE SHOP 



-4-4- 4-4 -4-1 -f 



Ducane 

GAS GRILLS 







i i-i i 

Replacement grill parts available for 

all makes & models including 

Charmglovj & Sunbeam 

586-3344 

1731 Nottingham Way, Rt. 33 

(Exit 63 off Rt. 295) Hamilton Twp. 

Tues-Sat 10-5; Thurs 'til 8 ' 



6»| W« far 
your Hrwpttct 



Ivy League Lacrosse 

Last Week's Games 

Princeton 11 Penn 8 

Brown 1 1 Yale 5 
Brown 7 Princeton 5 
Penn 16 Dartmouth 9 
W L 



round pick in the major league 
draft. Glanville could not be 
contained to the first game, 
going 2-for-4 with two RBIs, a 
triple and a stolen base as the 
Quakers racked sophomore 



The Softball team captured 
its eighth Ivy crown in nine 
years, sweeping Yale and 
Brown over the weekend at 
1895 Field. Moore (11-4) pitched 



hurlerToddTaylor(2-2)totheir '"""sUcally .fanning 29 bat- 
ters in 17 innings, while walk- 



Brown 

Princeton 

Penn 

Harvard 

Cornell 

Yale 

Dartmouth 



Pet 

1.000 
.667 
.600 
.500 
.333 
.250 
.000 



6-0 victory. 
Princeton really didn't stop 



ingfiveand allowing only seven 
hits and three earned runs. 
Against Yale, Princeton — 



Wednesday, April 17 

Brown at Harvard 
Saturday, April 20 
Harvard at Princeton 

Penn at Brown 
Cornell at Dartmouth 
Wednesday, April 24 



Glanvulemtoeroghtcapeither, needing to ^ both games _ 

but, unlike the opener, the Ti- scored ^ ^^ ^ m ae 

ger bats blasted the Penn seventh and final toning twice. 

SSS5 g M ,o J , U , n ' 0r i J Ce !.. ln J"" 1 " 1 - K"t baseman Dyan 
Butter-field (2-1) went the dis- Dieda singled home me lone 

MStSE^&SS* ™ >» * 1-0 victory in the 
opener, and junior third 
baseman Leslie Silverman 



to which he allowed three first 
inning runs. Princeton re- 
sponded with twice that num- 



plated two to the 4-3 win in the 



her in its half of the frame, hightcap 
sparkedbyjuiuor M teherScott Mu . r wa jj oping Br own, 7-0, 
Hayes two-run single. With the m Sunday's or*neY, the Tigers 
score 7-3 Princeton after two tookadvantageofsomeshoddy 
innings the teams traded runs Bear defense and strong relief 

^J^h hi \ Way aS S, e £•" bv Moore t0 recapture the Ivy 
1^1, Black Prevailed, 9-5. ut le from last year's champi- 
Dartmouth at Yale Princeton picked up two ons M The tf- £ 

•-•!-•-•-•-.• mme wms Sundav a 8 alnst the remainder of the season 

with the Princeton Invitational 
this weekend. 

— Mike Jackman 

Tri-Track Meet Results; 
PHS Boys 2-0, Girls 1-1 

In a triangular track meet 
with Hightstown and Hun 
School last week, the Princeton 
High boys' team got past 
Hightstown, 68-63, and defeated 
Hun School, 74-49. The Little Ti- 
ger girls defeated Hun, 80-41, 
but lost to the Rams, 68-52. 

The meet, the first of the sea- 
son for the Little Tigers, was 
held at the PHS track. The two 
PHS teams will compete next 
in Saturday's annual Highland 
Park meet. 

Princeton's Nixon Grant was 
a triple winner. He won the 100 
and 200 meter dashes in 11.6 
and 23.3, outsprinting Hun's 
Doug Bullock in both events, 
and also captured the javelin 
with a toss of 135-11. The ver- 



The Phoenix Group 

TRADITIONAL PSYCHOTHERAPY 

TRANSPERSONAL COUNSELING 

BIOFEEDBACK SERVICES 



Frank Haronian, Ph.D. 
609-883-2662 

George Colnaghi, Ph.D. 
609-921-8127 

Dale Starcher, M.Ed. 
609-737-0887 

Kathleen Hanes, MCAT, MS 

609-921-0322 
In the game of life we all can 
use a coach from time to time. 

12 ROSZEL ROAD, SUITE C 203, PRINCETON 
(609)452-1110 




NOTICE TO 
MERCER COUNTY RESIDENTS 

from the Mercer County Improvement Authority 

MERCER COUNTY'S RECYCLING PROGRAM 

NOW ACCEPTS ADDITIONAL 

MATERIALS FOR COLLECTION: 

• MAGAZINES 

• BROWN CORRUGATED CARDBOARD 

Magazines and Corrugated Cardboard 
MUST BE SEPARATED and 
TIED IN SMALL BUNDLES. 

Magazines, Cardboard and Newspapers 
MUST NOT BE MIXED TOGETHER! 

• PLASTIC LAUNDRY DETERGENT BOTTLES 

• PLASTIC FABRIC SOFTENER BOTTLES 

• PLASTIC BLEACH BOTTLES 



Which have the symbol 



HDPE 

(please rinse all containers) 



embossed or printed 
on the bottom. 



These materials may now be placed at the curb 

with the yellow residential recycling containers. 

Multi-family residents may use 

the appropriate containers provided by your complex. 

HELP KEEP MERCER COUNTY 
THE #1 RECYCLER IN NEW JERSEY 

For information call the 
Mercer County Improvement Authority, 695-1200 




Sports 

Continued from Preceding Page 

Hun Girls Are Now 5-0 
After Lacrosse Wins 

"I'm very proud of their 

' sportsmanship and their deter- 
mination. They are enjoying 
the sport and that's what it is 
all about," commented Hun 
girls' lacrosse coach Sherry 
Felker this week, after her 
team posted three more wins to 

* remain unbeaten. 

That determination, an em- 
phasis on team play and the 
continued scoring of Kathy 
Leahy combined last week to 
lead Hun to a 10-4 victory Satur- 

t day over previously unbeaten 
Villa Joseph Marie in a tense 
and physical encounter; a 7-6 

squeaker over Hopewell Valley WIDE OF THE NET: Hun School's Andrea Beske (26) gets off a shot that ap- 
in which Cathy Flores scored pears to be headed past Hopewell Valley goalie Jane Karlicek into the net. Ball 
the tying and winning goals in was wide but Hun came on to defeat the Bulldogs, 7-6. 



the last two and a half minutes 
of play, and a wild and wooly 
, 14-12 victory earlier in the week 
over town rival Stuart Country 
Day School in which Hun 
scored 11 goals in the second 
half. 



PHS Girls to Host PDS ninth - and two from Sara Better Record Ahead 
In Lacrosse Wednesday GUler, the teams draw player, Seen b H Laxmen 

J and her first two of the season. J 

Emulating former New York Tara Tibbott and Daphne All in all it was not a good 

Mayor Ed Koch, the Princeton Smith added single goals. weck f° r the Hun boys' lacrosse 

TheplayofthePHSmidfield team - 

and scoring by Wilson and Monday's scheduled game 

Bustamante combined to bring mth Livingston was rained out. 

winless Peddie down. Because Admiral Farragut is 

Bustamante had a hat trick and 

. junior middie Jennifer Zar 

Tuesday, both at 3:45. Both and '^ tw , day ? earlier, a 's° scored her first two goals of the 

season to go along with 

Wilson's six. Veteran goalie 

Joan Sullivan played her first 

The game with visiting Villa P™ceton Day School this full game in goal for the Blue 

' '-' and White this season and stop- 
ped half of the Falcons' eight 



High girls' lacrosse team could 
Coming up for the Raiders, in ask this week, "How're we do- 
the first two of four straight ! n S". The answer: "you're do- 
home games will be a contest ln 8 ^ ast fine." 
Friday against West Windsor The Little Tigers hammered 
and one with Oak Knoll on Mornstown, 11-2, on Friday 
Tuesday, both at 3:45. Both and ' tw0 davs earlier, also 
teams have the potential to end s J cored n S 03 ' 8 m stopping Ped- 
Hun's win streak. die . nA - If the now 3 "' Little 

Tigers defeat town rival 



SPRING 
PROMOTION 

20 - 30% OFF 

All 

Baldwin 

Hardware & Bathware 

Products 

Get a jump on your spring 
fix-up and Remodeling Activities. 

You will find excellent savings 

on selected switch plates, 

cabinet hardware, bath accessoiies, 

dead bolts and Images™ products. 



798 River Road 
Fair Haven, NJ 

07704 
(908) 842-3550 



Continued on Next P 



Hoi* 



74 Witherspoon St 

Princeton, NJ 

08540 

(609) 924-5544 



Joseph Marie, was "very Wednesday in their next start 
' tense" admitted Felker. The they will have already match 



first-year coach reported she ed last y ear ' s total number ot shots 

r . - _ . itrirtc An. 



spent the half time trying to get w ' ns - , , 

heT players to relax and to con- . In sconng 22 goab m the first 

centrate on their game. "As four games, junior Elise Wdson 

usual, they came through. They has alread y notched more """! 

really know how to work with w ' ce as man y as she scored 

each other," she said. last year. 

Leahy scored four goals for , 

the victors to run her total to 27 As ( . for .^"f? 3 ,?, 8 ,^ 45 

in five games - more than half meet ' n 6 w* PDS, Little Tiger 

of the 51 she scored all last sea- coac , n Joyce Jones employed a 

son. Streya Volla added three word she alwa £ s " s | s to d f 

goals but perhaps had an even ?, c " be ™\ ™ S -. PDS , match - 

Ireater impact on the outcome "T^'f^ l?Z" ' k "H 

.with her sportsmanship, de- what they have but I know vvha 

*spite being hacked and slashed we bave t0 b " n S ° tne P art y. 

by the visitors. Rather than saidJones. It s always a super 

yield to the temptation to TheV^npTcoa'choDen 
retaliate, Volla said, "I let it , Tbe " etera "f" h coacbo P en 

come through in my play." ed thed °° r a htt ' e as ,° I t ' le out ; 
~ Je come by concluding, I hope at 

„ Cathy Flores, Susie Markson theendtobe4-l.''ThePanthers 

and Tara Ballarotto added w ° n . la ; *?<*? * f> m %1£ ... 

single goals. Because she em- . ™ e „ fo "™. ,n | day ; ™ S w '" 
i.,-™ i mm «i.„ it :, h .,j host West Windsor at 3: 45. The 
phasizes team play, it is hard annear to be as 

to pick out individuals, said V rates d0 not a PP ear t0 De a ! 
Felker, but she allowed that strong as in previous years bu 
Erica Vogler, Jumana Soudah J° nes was ™'^ k S? m - „L d °" ' 
and Becky Jensen played a know about that. They gave us 
very defensive game for Hun in « 8°° d f™ las < JJ" » h ™ 
containing VJM. They and *% *£ »* ^agoaH - ] u 
goalie Judy Persichetti shut out * at * as ! ast y ear and tms 1S 
the visitors in the first half. mis year ' 

"Their defense played really 
well," echoed Jems coach John Little Things the Difference 
McOwen. "We haven't been In averaging ten goals a 
stopped like that all year." game so far, the Little Tigers 

have gotten off to a good scor- 

Hopewetl Takes Lead ing start, Jones readily conced- 
„ ,. ,r ii „j n,„ ed, but the early success has 

Ear her, Hopewell scored the ^ ' more than 

game's first goal against jisrt- ™ ,.„, the me 

ing Hun. Leahy tied it. Hope- J „ ft , 
well then scored the next two «>mgs, sa rfj™*. 
before Leahy scored on a lai „ ed . "WVre winning more 

EfSr"??;, , a L fH™ g one^n-one situations. That in- 
led Hun 3-2 at halftime. reases our scoring ppor- 
Another goal by Leahy m the £™ fter ^f^Ue 
second half one by BaUarotto , defensive play 
and Flores' Uiree goals fueled ^ the S mi dfield controlling 
Hun's second half in which t . h Ue B h 
outscoredHV.M.Persicheth™ G fi Ier and Stephanie 
was sharp again in goal with 20 Krauthamer are responsible 
saves - for that. 

Kate Donovan scored eight n an0 ^ er aspe ct the 

goals for Stuart against Hun, coaches haye noticedi S aid 



Another piece that has fallen 
into place for Jones this year 
has been the play of Busta- 
mante whom she switched to 
attack from defense. Said 
Jones, "This is her first season 
at it and she is learning with 
each game. She knows which 
shot works and which doesn't." 

In contrast to last year's 
team which lost seven of its 
first nine games, this year's is 
more confident, allowed Jones. 
"They know what we didn't ac- 
complish last year; they want 

to qualify lor the states this 

year; they want to surpass last 
year. They're beginning to see 
what it takes." 



1 SaLE ' into 

New Arrivals 



SpRlNG 





Pre-season prices 

on short sleeve knits 

and denims. 

"Quality Clothing at Army-Navy Prices" 



Princeton Army-Navy 

14 1 /2 Witherspoon Street • 924-0994 




The Early Bird 
Catches the Deal 

WARM UP SAbi 

SEASON'S BEST PRICES NOW • DON'T WAIT! Aj 



Carrier 



•5 YEARS PARTS & LABOR 

• NO PAYMENTS TiLL SPRING 

• NO FINANCE CHARGES 
TILL SPRING 



four in each half, as she out 



Jones, is the passing game. 



scored the entire Hun team in I™ ,^ " wor king on "that. It 
the first 25 minutes of play. It ^ tjme but , have tne pa _ 

was "' t I enou S h - . . , tience," she smiled. 
With Leahy scoring six goals, ^ ^ Uiere ^ wi]son ^ 

Flores three and Volla her first junior has gone 6-5*5 

two of the season, Hun came on ™' ■ the first four 
to outlast Stuart, 14-12. With '"^ ,.|, Use certainly has 
three minutes left, Leahy ^ ded t0 my wan t ad for a 
scored to knot the score at 12. ^^ „ Jones comme nted. 
In the final minutes Leahy and .. she . s ' doin g on-the-job train- 
Volla would score again to pro- ghe doing a terri fi c job." 

vide the winning margin. 6 ' 

Markson, Ballarotto and A inst Morr jstown, PHS 
Mary Pat McDonald also bre J' zed t0 an 8 _, halftime lead 

scored for Hun. and then coas ted to its win. 

„„.. Besides Wilson's five goals, 

«*SttSS" h " V0 " n6Cd '" MB^t two from Caroline 
_L topics. Bustamante - her eighth and 






Princeton Fuel: 
(609) 924-1100 Or 
(609) 587-4400 

Consumers Oil/Hillman Thompson 
(609) 394-8101 Or 
(609) 261-5953 



Junction Fuel: 
(201) 329-2155 

Jamesburg Fuel: 
(201) 521-0561 



s Sports 

• Continued from PnKeding Pagfl 

5 still new to the sport, Satur- 
i- day's .contest with the Future 
i* Admirals was treated as a 
Z jayvee game. (The Hun jay- 
£ vees defeated the AF varsity, 
5 12-5.) 

g The previous day, Hun 
< travelled to Boonton and re- 
al ceived a 14-1 shellacking, and it 
2 began the week with a 4-1 loss 
g to rival Princeton Day School. 
% The net result is the Raiders 

r are 1-4 and need to regroup. 
-> 

. "We will continue to try to 
q get our act together," stated 
£ Hun coach Dave Faus. "I 
o believe, as the team does, that 
5 by the second week of May we 
o. will be a very good team and 

8' that we will make a respecta- 
_. ble showing in our league." 
o Against Boonton, Hun played 
t" a good first half. The Raiders 
5 unravelled in the final period, 
o however, when they allowed 
K Boonton to score eight goals 





Tennis Memberships 
Available 

limited golf, swimming 
and platform tennis included 

Excellent Dining Facilities 
Country Club Setting 

CaUHopewell Valley Golf Club for details 
609-466-3003 



•A 



THREE ON THREE: Trying to set up a play Is Princeton High School s Tom Mur- 
ray (4) who has passed to Jason Battle as teammate John Haglos (33) iooks 
on. Defending during first-half action are three Pennington School players. PHS 
posted an easy 18-2 win. 



"but I like to think part of Unbeaten Streak Ends 



0. Jason Cohen lost the first set 

Todd Coyer had Hun's only itwaswhatwedid."Ina'ddition p nr puo Tennis Team in his second s l" Sles ma !u h 
goal, his fifth of the season, to Kinchla's four goals Tom lennis. leiin with Brett Trentham, won the 

Last Friday was the 12th. For second, 7-5, but lost the third, 4- 



to Kinchla's four goals 
Murray added a pair of scores 
The game with Princeton <hj S sixth and seventh) and the Princeton High tennis team 6, in the closet match of the con 



Day School was scoreless after j on n Hagios, Dan Petrecca 

the first half. Phil Garza and Travis Stone 

In the second half, the home added single goals, 

team Panthers beat Hun goal- s A f „ 

le Pat Tutek four times while " ' ... „ - 

holding Hun to a single goal in T . ">psiaea w,n over Pe ™" ville School, which had edged 



it seemed like the 13th. test. Brent Breithaupt went 

The previous day, PHS had down, 6-0, 6-1, at third singles. 

blanked Lawrence High, 5-0, Then was R0 respite from 



for its fourth. consecutive 54 ^ Big Red players in doubles 
tnumph, On Fnday, Lawrence- . * ilher p 

•rilUMwJ whi,h h.H .H„ed P'^*™^ p hil Scott and 



the final period by sophomore ">g'<>" School was, >n large ihe Little Tigers, 3-2, last year, .""yZhu were blanked, 6-0, 

WU1 Tate. The win was the fifth measure, the Murray and fhis time thumped the Blueand f n "hit Todd Dlueosz and 

in a row for unbeaten PDS. Kinch| a Show Murray scored whit e netmen, 5-0. In winning £"■ ™' e '°™ stoDDed 6-1 6- 

tw ce but Dreferred to set ud r nr n,» «>./.nH H m » thi= w >r uan wan B weresuweuo-i, , o- 



Kinchla Provides Goals 
In 2 PHS Lacrosse Wins 

The logic of Princeton High 
lacrosse coach Jim Harris was 
unassailable. 

"If you win it means you're 
scoring. If you're scoring, you 
must be doing something 
right," observed Harris, after 
his team had stopped a lifeless 
Clarkstown South High on 
Saturday, 10-1. Two days 
earlier, the Little Tigers had 
overwhelmed Pennington 
School, 18-2. 



twice but preferred to set up f or the second time this year, 
plays from behind the Red the Big Red took every set but 
Raider goal, assisting on seven one 



"Tom did very well. That's 
what he wants to do," said Har- 
ris. "Two goals and seven 
assists ... nine points ... not a 
bad day. He had a part in half 
our goals. I'll take that." 

Kinchla had five goals and 
two assists in his first action of 
the season. Said Harris: "In 
practice he had been showing 
that he was ready to play and 
make an impact. He's a real 
tough kid. I'd say he was about 



1, by the Larries' Ed Culotta 
and Eugene Yoon. 
In two matches at home this 
In singles play, Princeton's week, PHS will oppose Notre 
George Khalaf lost for the first Dame on Wednesday and Stein- 
time to Gog Boonswang, 6-4, 6- ert on Friday, both at 3:45. 



THE BOLD LOOK 

KOHLER 




Before you 
remodel, see 

us for the 

entire line of 

Kohler Products 

and a 
free estimatee. 



Jefferson (Bath & "Kitchen 

198 Witherspoon Street, Princeton 
924-0762 
Hours: Monday-Friday 9-5; Saturday 9-3 



>' 



The scaring surge by PHS so percent. We got a good look 
has been triggered by Tad a ( him and took him out in the 



KinchJa. Against Pennington, 
Kinchla saw action for the first 
time this season, after recover- 
ing from the effects of an acci- 
dent and a twisted ankle. The 
senior tn-ca plain poured in five 
goals in limited action against 
Pennington and four against 
Clarkstown to take over the 
team scoring lead. 

The two wins left the Little 



third quarter. Both he and Mur- 
ray are doing what we had 
hoped they would." 

Again, the ease of the out- 
come was somewhat of a sur- 
prise to Harris because the Red 
Raiders, he said, were "more 
effective against other teams 
and played better against oth- 
er teams." The difference, Har- 
ris felt, was not a matter of 
depth (he carries only 17-18 on 
Tigers wiUi a 3-1 record and on ^^^^ but one of talent. "I 



the threshold of what will be 



just think we had more knowl- 



their most crucial four games edge , m , acrosse , ^ 

of the season. er f. ° 6 

This Wednesday PHS will 

host Hunterdon Central at 4; Besjdes j^^ (ive u 

Saturday it will travel to Hagios had three goal | and 

Bndgewater East, Monday i M Jason K % b d 

w^hostWestfieldat4andnext Jared Bi|anin had two y each 

Wednesday . will entertain Kirby's were his first two of the 

Montclarr. Ah are formidable seas £ n G j „ , 

opponents ; who wlU most cer- D R oh rer and Brendon 

tainly test the Little Tigers Bra £ on contributed sing , e 

Very, very tough teams, n,^ ", 

t^™^, ."??!; ''?"' ! PHS led 10-2 at halftime and 



^ (an a mattress really maHp your day? 

iSEAiy: 
LY! 

SEALY TOSTUREPEDIC 

You can't beat the Posiurepedic feeling — waking up 

wonderfully rested with no morning backache from sleeping 

on a too-soft mattress. Superb 

comfort and firm support, 

built to last. And, costt- 

only pennies 

anight! 



like to think of them more as a 
challenge than tough. I think 



Little Tiger goalie Ryan 



"■"^"K" u ' a " TS 1 . ' ,T Branon shut out Pennington in 

we're up to them/' His goaLhe the second half. He had eight 

said, is to win them all. That savps 

may not happen. "But we have 

to keep pace with making the 

states; that's one of our goals," 

stressed Harris. 

Besides outscoring their op- 
ponents, 28-3, in the last two 
games, the Little Tigers are 
coming on, Harris said, "be- 
cause a lot of people are pick- 
ing up the slack. Our mid- 
fielders are hustling offensive- 
ly and defensively; our defense 
certainly has been physical. 
I'm pleased right now. If we 
continue to come along, I'll be 
extremely pleased this time 
next week." 

The win over newcomer 
Clarkstown South was a little 
surprising in its ease, admitted 
Harris. Disappointed was 
Clarkstown coach Howie Rub- 
enstein, Harris' assistant last 
year, who told him that his _ 
team had not come to play. 

Clarkstown's leading scorer T0WN topics' aovertisers know 
was ineffective, reported Har- what p,,nce,on customers wanI 



PHS's Williams to Play 
For All-American Team 

Princeton High School senior 
guard Brian WUliams has been 
invited to Denver to play in the 
eighth Annual Joint Effort High 
School All American Game on 
Saturday. 

Williams, who had a standout 
senior season for the Little 
Tigers, will join Anthony White 
(who just finished his season at 
Northfield Mt. Hermon) in the 
back court for the U.S.A. Boys 
All-American Team. 

John Bailey, games coordi- 
nator, in speaking on the selec- 
tions, stated that "Brian Wil- 
liams is a very deserving young 
man and I'm happy that the 
National Board nominated 
him." 




OPEN MON., WED., &FRI. 

10AM-6PM 

(MT.H0LLYFRI.TIL9) 

TUE.4THUR..10AM-8PMSAT 

9AM-5PM,SUN.NOOrMPM 




FIRMNESS 
MED. FIRM 
FIRM 
FIRM 

EXTRA FIRM 
SUPER FIRM 
EXTRA FIRM 



.,_ TWIN FULL QUEEN KING 

MODEL WARRANTY EA. PC. EA. PC. SET SET 



KENT 

COMFORT 

F.B. CLASSIC 

F.B. SUPREME 

GOLD CROWN 

INVITATION 



1YR. $4950 $7950 NA NA 

5/1 $68 $109 $268 NA 

10/1 $85 $122 $296 $423 

15/1 $107 $149 $359 $494 

15/3 $139 $198 $439 $640 

15/5 $159 $229 $499 $699 



,k^;vyj^in«H>l:lj>1>IUfcl-]jlf>W'JiT>HiiiiJ,UJ.y>v 



FREE BED FRAME OR PILLOWS WITH ANY 15 YR. WARRANTY SET PURCHASED 



OUR ORIGINAL FACTORY OUTLET STORE" 

CAPITAL BEDDING 
COMPANY 

9Qft-0Q1fl Rle ,30Blwn Yard* & Bordentow 
fci/U U3 I \J Yardville. NJ 08620 



/ 



"OUR NEW SISTER STORE" 

CAPITAL CHIROPRACTIC 
SLEEP SHOP 

0£C A AAA ■OOQWooflianeRc At Come- O' 5" Het>. T:" 



Sports 

Continued from Preceding Page 

A Tale of Two Teams: 
Hun Wins, PHS Loses 

* It was the best of times for 
'-. the Hun baseball team; it was 
the worst of times for Prince- 
ton High. 

Both teams were coming off 
terrible losses. Hun had been 
three-hit in being blanked by ri- 
val Lawrenceville School, 8-0. 

"The Little Tigers had been 
humiliated, 27-6, by Hamilton. 
Both teams needed a win but 
winless PHS even more so. And 
it looked as if the Little Tigers 
were going to capture that first 
one. They were three outs away 

'from a 4-3 win. They never got 
it. 

Hun's Tom Chiacchio opened 
the Raiders' last chance with a ] 
flare hit over shortstop and ! 
stole second. Chris Hayman, j 
the PG from Notre Dame, fol- 1 
"lowed with his third hit. When 
PHS hurler Colin Apse fell L_, 

behind 2-0 to Matt Hyldahl, who ru .,,„._.,_ .-„,* ^^■■■■SB 
had homered earlier, he asked h™" flPION 1 S . F0R THIRD STRAIGHT YEAR: Huckel's Dental Off^u^!? 
PHS coach Larry Mansierifhe^fmp'pnsriip game of the Princeton YMCA A Leaaue mS l„" e r > W ° h n ,h S 
could put Hyldahl on. "Okay, as defeated Dayton Auto, 65-49, in the title game last wmK atThe Hu„ ^^. hen " 
long as you don't walk the next R'ck S.mkus and Kirk Huckel were the letdmq swrere totta ch-mni^, 00 ' ^"l 
. batter," replied Mansier. won the A League crown for the third yearln a row and thP ««h P «m' " h .'^ 
The next batter, Princeton last seven years. Team members mtU first row fmmilw "o time ' n , ,he 
resident Dan Wilson, drilled a Kirk Huckel and Jan Blazewski SerTond row »rf ™il 2. m left ' a „ re Ro 5 ue Ca,vo - 
2-2 pitch right up the middle to Slmkus and FranrNarbeshuber ° Simson > Perr V s ensi, **k 

srnre the tying and game- ■ - 




Jay's Cycles 




SCHWIMN • RALEIGH • TflEK • UNIVEGA • SPECIALIZED • CAMNONDALE 

ACCESSORIES -PARTS - REPAIRS • TOURiNG EQUIPMENT • CLOTHING 



PRINCETON 
(609) 924-7 J33 

T-i9 Nassau SI 



EXERCISE 

BIKES 
150 BIKES 

ON DISPLAY 



PWNCETON MEADOWS 

SHOPPING CENTER 

(609) 275-0234 

660 PlainstXMO Rd Plainsbofo 



score the -., ,, ...-.- ,-,.„...., 

winning runs. Hun had won for two outstanding defensive 

the third time in seven games, plays. He took a homerun away 

' while PHS fell to 0-5. from Baum in the sixth by rac- 



2-3-9-8-5 "There were a lot of errors." 

That's not a winning lottery Wayd £i. h ?, added ' " hUrtS 

..Ithoughtwe pl ayedweUbut ttSffl£S3 j^^TKS S^t^'w^me 

sm-kse; wjaasssrj ^«?? = ft-aS©" 

for the Little Tigers was the ed back and took the baU over Hf^on catcher &»t Way- a " e J™ f ™ "™ n \ ' 

complete game hurled by Apse, his shoulder," said McQuade da .° ne » f the premier payers From Peak to Valley 

the first for PHS this season. Hyldahl also threw a runner nut !." „ ty L ~ who wul P 13 ? In its tw0 Previous starts, 

Apse scattered 10 hits, walked at third in his other defensive wL°^ f k, t at , Rid ? 7 Hu " had gone from a peak to a 

two and struck out two. "It's a gem blasted a double, triple and solo valley. The valley was its loss 

big deal for us We've been homer, in going 4-for-5 and to Lawrenceville. 

pitching by committee," said Hun's Hayman had three hits ^"IP* in J iv t Hor ", et r . unS :. In '; Law " !ncevul ? P^V^ very 

Mansier. and three steals for Hun ChSc aU . Hamdton banged out 25 hits well. They used a nice left- 

"We got lucky at the end," chio had twotite andWUsT L°I 'X^JTt ^ ° f the 25 "ander against us, who kept us 

admitted McQuade. "It was coming on behind the elate had wer T e back-to-back homeruns. off stride," commented 

nice to see the kids come TnZIr nitTadSn to Ws V™ Pr ° bal ? ly T ° f i he "^W"" '£"1 ' WaS **"* 

through." game-wi^ophomore left ^ y"^ fie? P°' nted J^f' ' ^t «P for the 

fielder Matt DeVeau had three c ° m "" a °" ""' Pa9 ° 

of Princeton's nine hits ; Healey 



For Toting Books 
or Day Hiking! 



TO CELEBRATE EARTH DAY 

The Nickel will be donating a 

percentage of its business on 

April 20th & 21st to 

The Audubon Society & The Sierra 

Club to aid in their Delaware 

River Restoration Project. 



ALL 
DAY PACKS 

20 % OFF 

thru 4/24 

Quality packs from 




Princeton Forrestal Village • Rt. 1 & College Rd. 
Princeton, NJ • (609) 520-9899 
23 Main Street • Madison, NJ . (201) 377-3301 
Formerly Blue 

The Nickel A TVfcrrrfD ','■ I M / 



In games this week, Prince- „. , 

ton High will be at Steinert had two. 

Thursday and host West Wind- Junior Jeremy Skule also 

sor on Monday. Both start at went the distance for Hun and 

3:45 - got the win, his second against 

Hun, after a scheduled one loss. 

meeting with Pennington, will 

entertain Hightstown on Thurs- With his three hits DeVeau is 

day at 3:45, Ewing on Saturday batting over .500 for PHS. 

at noon and then visit Newark Brophy, who leads the team in 

Academy on Tuesday. extra base hits with three, is 

Baum Singles In Run batting over .400 as is the vet- 

. Against Hun, visiting PHS eran Petrone. Healey is hitting 




Attn: Photographers 

We Are a Savage Stockhouse Dealer 



1 



tied the game at two in the 
fourth when Matt Baum singl- 
ed home Chris Healey. It then 



the ball at a .350 clip. 

"We've got a lot of guys who 
are batting high," said Man- 
sier. So far — and sadly for 



plated two more runs in the | 1 ^ So ' ar ~ and M< " y J° r 
next inning to take a 4-2 lead P ™. " th * ^ ^h^t ™ " 
when Aaron Cooper, on a nifty £? m ' g „ a j th , e , rl , g ^ tune - 
play, avoided a tag at the plate We v f, had ato m t_ of base run- 
for one run and Jim Brophy 
singled home Scott Petrone. 

For Hun, in addition to hit- 
ting a clutch homerun, Hyldahl 
was praised by McQuade for 



ners," added Mansier, "but 
we've loaded them up with two 
outs a lot of the time. It's time 
to collect." 



Everything you need 
to live your lift;.,. 



PRIN 



CETON 



SHOPPING-CENTER 



55 fine stores, restaurants and services 

including Acme, Epstein's Department 

Store and Superfresh 



Located between 

Route 27 
(Nassau Street) 
& Route 206 on 
North Harrison 

Street 

in Princeton N.J. 

609-921-6234 





Background Paper in Assorted Colors 53 "x 12 yds. 

107"x 12 yds. (on core) 

Glassine Envelopes 35mm to 8x10 

Filmlok Storage Pages 

Film-tax ® Pres-tax Mounting Material 

Pre-cut Mat Mounts in White ® Colors 

Photomailers 5x7 to 17x21 

Pre-vue Mounts 

Storage Boxes for Film-lok 



■ 




Free Parking in our own lot 
Open your own U-Store account 
and charge instantly, or use 
VISA, MasterCard or AmEx 



Open Mon.-Sat. 9:00-5:30 Thurs. 'til 8:30 



36 University Place 
609-921-8500 



7 Sports 

«- Continuod from Pfooaoino Page 

S game. Lawrenceville is a big ri- 
*". vai." 

t The nice lefthander for the 
J Big Red was Frank Spina, who 
£ held Hun to three hits (Chiac- 

< chio. Skule and Sam Boraie) 
> and struck out nine. 

< 

Q 

[3 Hun began the week with a 
z 20-0 rout of Admiral Farragut 

8 in a game stopped after five in- 
i nings. Boraie pitched a one- 
-, r hitter for Hun. "He pitched a 
x good ball game," said 
x - McQuade, who predicted the 
o sophomore "will do more and 
tu more for us as the year pro- 



FORER PHARMACY 
160WltherspoonSt. 

Pharmaceuticals 

Orthopedic Supplies 

921-7287 




'■'■■■■ t» 



XWWVIIIM/ 

U.S. Highway 130, Windsor 

448-1 667 FREE ESTIMA TFS 



TIGER GARAGE 

Complete Auto Service 
NJ Inspection & Re-Inspection Service 

924-0609 



343 Witherspoon St. 



3 Hyldahl rapped a pair of 
"■ doubles and two singles. He had 
g three hits in one inning when 
2 Hun scored 15 runs in the third. 
O "I've never seen that before; £j 
z he had a career in one inning" ■ ■ 
$ cracked McQuade. 
O After a rough first game, 

Hyldahl, said McQuade, "is 

tearing the cover off the ball" 

and is batting over .500. 

Taft, Greenwich Defeat 
PDS Girls in Lacrosse 

Princeton Day coach Kim, 
Bedesem knows she is in for a 

season-long project teaching GOING FOR BROKE AND THE BALL: Princeton Day's Marcy Webster goes after 
her young players the fun the ba( | wn | C h has |ust fallen out of the stick of a Taft player in the first half 

damentals as well as the finer j Saturday's game. Taft won the c ontest, 16-6. tpi>cu> t, y i™\> phiuipsi 

points of the game. l " 

The hope is this will pay ahead goal near the end of the had the most difficult match of Jumping on Pennington hurler 
dividends in the next two years, first half for a 6-5 PDS lead, the afternoon, needing a third Ricky Durst early, the Blue and 
In the meantime, the Panthers However, the second half was set tiebreaker (7-1) to defeat White tallied three times, 
are having to pay for this ex- all Taft, which scored 11 unan- his opponent. He had won the A double by Dave Jackson 

perience with defeats, and two swered goals for a 106 triumph, first set 6-4, before losing the and a single by Scott Feldman 

of them came on successive Cindy Shafto and Emily Miller second by the same score. put runners on first and third. 

days last weekend. After an split the time in goal. The Wirstrom brothers blew An infield single by Harvey 

opening win against Pingry, through their matches in two Bradley brought in the first 

they are now, 1-2. Bedesem is realistic about sets, Rob winning, 6-3, 6-3, and run, Totten singled home 

the long road ahead this season. Marc capturing a 6-3, 6-4 deci- 

On Friday, the Blue and "We only have three girls with sion. Ragsdale and Bilanin 

White and Greenwich both any real varsity experience, likewise had no trouble at first 

looked somewhat lethargic in a the rest are up from the jayvee doubles with a 6-4, 6-4, but 

slow-paced game that the squad, and don't have good Sheldon and DeCore lost in two 

visitors finally won, 12-8. "This techniques. We keep losing the sets, 6-1, 7-5. 

was the kind of game we might ball on simple possessions. Last 

have won," commented year, we started two or three ppg Baseball Wins 5-1 

Bedesem. levels above this, but we lost 13 _ „ . „. . _. ,„, 

Saturday morining, her or 14 girls. For Best Start Smce 87 

pimjron ah o n v d much moro ■ -We ere going to novo to step Good pitching, good hitting 

spunk, losing to a solid Taft up our skill level, and that wifl and good weather have all com- 

squad, 16-6, after leading at take a season to do." bined to get the Princeton Day 

halftime, 6-5. "We led Taft in baseball team off to its best 

the first half on guts and deter- start since 1987. 

ruination," said Bedesem. "But ppg Tennis Wins Pair- The Panthers won their third 

in the second our lack of skills Mn-Roarrl Roaien straight without a loss last 

really hurt us. We kept losing H " n . Mo-Beard Beaten Wednesday and may have 

the ball in our end of the field, A pair of easy victories last established themselves as the 



- ALLEN'S 

■" Painting & Restorations 

We use top quality Benjamin Moore paints and 
careful preparation to make our paint jobs last. 

Feel free to ask our customers. 

Owner operated /Free prompt estimates 

Local references / Insured/Senior Citizen Discounts 



GUTTER CLEANING J) 

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR PAINTING^ 

f 609) 771-4189 ^/ 



Kirk Allen 



Continued on Next Page 



fRegeixt) 




Best Selection 

Every floor Armstrong makes, including 
an exclusive- Jtegal Solarian? 

Best Service 

Expert advice, an information center, even 
take-home samples. 



n st allation Guaranteed 

We guarantee the installation, and 
Armstrong guarantees the floor. . . in writing! 



#7 Route 31 North, Pennington, NJ 
(609) 737-2466 



> 



team to beat in the Prep B 
league. The 5-1 triumph over 
Pennington was the third over 
a Prep B opponent. That is an- 
other good omen; the Blue and 
White hasn't won a "B' title in 
many years. 

In contrast to other seasons 



and they would pick it up and week moved the Princeton Day 

go in for the score." tennis team to a 4- 1 record this 

spring, with their only loss 

The opponents won't get any coming to a solid West Windsor 
easier this week, with a pair of squad. The Panthers knocked 
nearby rivals set to test the off Hun, 4-1, last Thursday, and 
Panthers. Princeton High will blanked Morristown-Beard, 5- 
be the opponent on Wednesday, 0, on Friday, 
and Lawrenceville on Friday. This week, however, they will 

PHS had won three of four step up in the Prep B ranks and whenrain has plagued the ear 
through last weekend, while the face two of the better teams. iy going PDS has not had a 
Larries are also 3-1. They Coach Rome Campbell's 
defeated Greenwich, 8-6, but players were scheduled to meet 
lost to Taft, 6-3. Montclair-Kimberley this past 

In Friday's contest, Green- Tuesday, and will play Newark 
wich jumped out to an early Academy on Friday, 
lead, and led by 8-4 at halftime. Campbell's singles players, 
It was able to maintain that David Suomi and Rob and 
four-goal advantage in the sec- Marc Wirstrom, all posted two 
ond half, as each team scored set victories in the Mo-Beard 
four times. Sarah Berkman had match. Suomi lost just two 
three goals for PDS, Meghan games, Rob Wirstrom dropped 
Bencze added two, and Britte eight, and Marc, five. 



Lynam, Missy Collins and 
Jesse Eaton tallied one apiece. 

Against Taft, PDS started 
strongly matching the powerful 
visitors goal for goal in the first 
half. The Panthers' defense 
looked strong also, not allowing 
the Taft attack much chance to 
get free for shots on goal. 

Marcy Webster and Collins 
each tallied twice for the Pan- 
thers and Eaton notched the go- 



rainout so far. That will help 
later down the road, because 
postponements will not be 
crowding the schedule. Things 
do get more difficult from here, 
however. Next up are Allen- 
town High School this Wednes- 
day and Lawrenceville on Fri- 
day. PDS will face its fourth 
Prep B foe, Rutgers Prep, on 
the road Saturday. 
Against Pennington, senior 



DAILY RENTALS 




Ford Tempo 



B °i5 . d0 H, b i!? te l m l"! re If" Joel Totten Pitched his second 
victory, limiting the visitors to 
just three hits. He struck out 
eight and walked only four. 
Aided by a strong wind blowing 
in from center field, Totten 
mixed his pitches well, and 
kept the Pennington batters off 
balance with a fine change-up. 
Meanwhile, the Panthers 
gave Totten all the runs he 
would need in the first inning 



tended to three sets before win- 
ning. Dan Ragsdale and Mike 
Brown lost a second set tie- 
breaker (4-7), but took the first 
and third sets, 6-2 and 6-3. Chris 
Sheldon and Dennis DeCore 
also faltered in the middle set 
(4-6) but won the other two, los- 
ing just six games in the pro- 
cess. 

In the Hun contest, Suomi 



1991 Cars and Vans 

1991 Escort Four-Door Sedan 
1991 Tempo Four-Door Sedan 

1991 Aerostar Wagon 

1991 15-Passenger Club Wagon 

1991 Cargo Van 

All Cars and Vans Fully Equipped 

Call For Reservation 
Ask for Elmer Carson, 609-921-6400 




RENT-A-CAR 



Nassau Conover Motor Co. 

Route 206 • Princeton, N.J. 



This is where BMW and Volvo owners fl*^4P* 
decide to buy 



Irs where Saab's rood-holding, fronfwrcel drive leaves rear-whsei European 
»*" '•"Wfrig " *» "or. IA Soab also gives you baler iradjon on rain-soaked 
roads.) Come in and Iry one out. 



l^igM** 



SPORTSilNDSPECIALrSTCARS 



AUTHORIZED 



DEALER 



20 ARCTIC PARKWAY TRENTON, NJ 

(609) 989-SAAB 
Sales, Service, Parts and Custom Leasing 




Sports 

Continued from Preceding Page 

Feldman with the second and a 
wild pitch produced the third. 

* After allowing the visitors 
' their only run in the top of the 

third, PDS added two in- 
surance scores in the third. 
Feldman's triple drove home 
the first, and Bradley's double 
brought in Feldman. 
PDS was guilty of just two 

* errors in the field, and all in all 
this was a solid effort in every 
department. The Prep Tourna- 
ment is still almost a month 
away, but the feeling is the 
Panthers will be very much in 

„ contention for the title this 
spring. 

PDS Is Still Undefeated 
In Lacrosse with 6 Wins 

Rolling through Bianchi Divi- 
sion teams like a hot knife 
, through butter, the Princeton 
Day boys' lacrosse team is un- 
defeated through six games 
this spring. 

The two latest victims were 
the Hun School, a 4-1 loser last 
Wednesday, and Hillsborough, 
which fell, 6-3, on Friday. This 
* week's competition shouldn't 
throw up any roadblocks on the 
Panthers' path to success ei- 
ther. 

Scott Spence's team was set 
to play West Windsor this past 
. Tuesday, and Saddle River on 
t Friday. West Windsor is good 
in many sports, but lacrosse, a 
new sport in the district, isn't 
one of them. But give the 
Pirates time, and they'll be 
competitive. 

: The prospect of beating Hun 
School for the first time in 
many years unnerved the Pan- 
ther players somewhat last 
week. They had trouble com- 
pleting passes, holding on to the 
ball and picking it up. Hun was 
no better, and as a result 
through two periods of play, the 

fttball was on the ground more 
than anywhere else. 

i Offense was almost non- 
existent, neither goalie was 
tested, and the half ended in a 
0-0 deadlock, most unusal for a 
lacrosse game. 

» 

Coming out after the inter- 
mission, PDS wasted no time 
breaking the deadlock. Mark 
Trowbridge got free and fired 
in a long shot with just 18 
seconds gone in the period. The 
Princeton Day offense began to 
produce more shots on goal 
after that, and a few minutes 
later Brian Ferber made it 2-0 
on a shot from 15 feet away on 
the left side. 

However, PDS did not have 
this contest locked away. Hun 
tallied early in the fourth 
period to cut the deficit to one, 
and only a fine save by goalie 
Jud Henderson with 4:15 re- 
maining, prevented the Raid- 
ers from gaining a tie. 

With three minutes left, 
Henderson initiated a play that 
produced an insurance goal. 
Taking the ball up near the 
midfield stripe, he launched a 
long pass to the left corner. 
Campbell Levy corralled the 
ball, and found a wide open 
Charlie Baker near the Hun 
net. His hard shot made it 3-1. 
One more long, low shot by 
Trowbridge found the cage, 
and PDS had a 4-1 triumph. 

On Friday, for one reason or 
another, Princeton Day was 
without several starters for all 
or part of the game, and the re- 
sult was another weak first 
half. PDS didn't get its first tal- 
ly until moments before the 
first half ended. An inbounds 
Play called by Spence worked 
to perfection with Baker 
feeding Jon Trend for the goal. 

Early in the third, Levy as- 
sisted Ferber to make it 2-0, 
and before the period had end- 
«J. PDS had a 4-0 advantage. 
Trowbridge tallied on one of his 
patented outside blasts, and 
Levy spotted an opening in the 
Hillsborough defense and dodg- 




Debbie Smyth is also solid. 
Combined, they committed on- 
ly four errrors in 72 games. 
Lombardo led the team in runs 
scored (38) and games played I 
(44). . 

DeeDee Prickett, a graduate ■ 
of West Windsor-Plainsboro I 
High School, will rejoin the J 
team in mid-May when she I 
completes her junior year at ■ 
Ursinus College, where she is a ' 
varsity Softball and basketball I 
player. Cee Aerstin, an out- J 
fielder /catcher, will serve as a I 
player-coach. 



r 
i 



SAVE 50 : 

ON FILM DEVELOPING 
WHILE YOU SHOP! 



Since 1980, the red and black- 
uniformed Ficarro's has won 
both the league title and USSSA 
New Jersey State champion- 
ship six times. 

Since 1980 either Ficarro's, 3 
Seasons or Grove Plumbing 
have won the league title every 
year, and while they will be 
pre-season favorites again they 
will be challenged by Larkin's 
Gulf, Eagle Electric, Dot's 
Girls, Miller Lite Pride and 
Mercer Spring. Rounding out 
the 11-team league are Matt & 
Al's, Just for Fun and Roberts 
Landscaping. 

Each team will play each 
other three times. The league 
champion will be determined* 
through regular season play. 
The top six finishers will then 
engage in a playoff to deter- 
mined the playoff champion. 

Track Meet on April 27 
For Boys & Girls 9 to 14 

The Princeton Recreation 
Department and the Hershey 
Corp. will sponsor the fourth 



One-Hour Service • In The Mall 

Each picture is the best it can be 
or we reprint it free...now! 

Offer applies lo regular one-riour prices. No limit on 

number o! rolls discounted with this coupon. 4x6 color 

prints (print length vanes wilh film size) Otler applies to 

first set ol prints only. C41 in lab process Cannot be 

combined with other film developing offers. Coupon good 

through June 22. 1991 

° 11010703 



O 

f 
z 

H 

o 

.8 

z 
o 
m 

H 
O 



CPI photo finish ^th 

one hour photo fCT? 



Also Availat 
waller photos • film • insianl color pas; 
copies Irom pnnls • camefas and acce 



Princeton MarketFair 

T.G.I. Friday's entrance - nexl lo National Community Bank 



LOOK OUT BEHIND YOU!: Princeton Days Sarah 
Berkman cradles the ball as a Taft defender appears 
ready to commit mayhem in an attempt to gain 
possession. ,„„„,„ by Jaefe nmpt ) 

ed through for a goal. an element we've never had uor P- wlu sponsor the fourth 

Hillsborough tallied three in before - a legitimate cleanup annual Hershey Track and 

the fourth, but two more by hitter who can hit the ball Field Meet to be held next 

Trowbridge to complete his hat deep." Saturday, the 27th from 9 to 3 

trick, kept PDS comfortably 

ahead. The rest of the Ficarro's 

Spence praised Henderson s 9 uad nas Deen witn the team 

for keeping Hillsborough at least six years. It is led by a 

scoreless in the first period P air of veteran co-captains: 

while the PDS offense sput- outfielder Donna Nicholson and 



at the Princeton High School 
track (raindate is May 22). 

This is a free event for boys 
and girls 9 to 14 as of Decem- 
ber 31, 1991. Competition is held 

uc i-lto uuense sput- r. — :v~~ «-..«.—-»«*«.« separately between boys and 

'Jud had an awesome »rst-baseman Dee Discavage. girls in three age groups- 9 to 
larter," Spence com- Nicholson led Ficarro's last 10, 11 to 12 and 13 to 14. Spiked 

shoes are not allowed. 



first quarter," Spence com- — .., . 

mented. Allowing just one goal vear ln mttln g Wlth a - 513 
._ average, in runs batted in with 



and making 14 saves in the con- - « 

test, before he was relieved by 34 and in extra base hits. _ : t u 

Rob Hall, Henderson now has a . Beth A ™' W1 " J* at s f cmd high school track the morning 
save percentage of 92 percent base and Grace Dur'and, who f the event. All will receive a 
"I used to be a goalie, and 65 has n T ver mt helov ' ■ 50 ° and participation achievement cer 
percent is considered great," owns the teams highest overall - 
said Spence average over the years, returns 

' _ to third. Janet Comerford, back 

Ficarro's Opens Season ; from maternity leave, will start 

r»-i u- _¥ £. -iu j behind the plate. 

Pitching Is Strengthened The outfieW of Cindy Lom , 

The Princeton-based Steve bardo, Doreen Romanchuk and 
Ficarro's Auto Body women's 
softball team was scheduled to 
open its 1991 season this week 
against Grove Plumbing at 
Mercer Park. 



Participants sign up at the 
high school track the morning 
of the event. All will receive a 
participation achievement cer- 
tificate. Winners will advance 
to the District Meet and those 
winners go on to the State Meet, 
both held in June. 

For more information, call 
the Recreation Department at 
921-9480. 



Spring Gutter 
Cleaning 

By the man who is. . . 

. . .faster than a falling leaf! 

' He not only cleans gutters — he • 
rescues them by: 

• removing all roof debris from valleys, 
behind skylights and chimneys. 

• removing all gutter debris by hand 

• eliminating 98% of gutter grime 
by Hydroflushing any and all 
gooky gutters. 

• guarantees 'no clogs'. 

• tightening all gutter rails. 

• providing a damage/repair report 
on anything above 1st story. 

His average 

gutter cleaning price? 

$55.00 - 65.00! 



rem 

i *( 

L 



gutter cleaning *gutter repairing 
*and...gwtter replacement/ ("*> 

-seamless copper galvanized buJt-iiB itl'ttff i 



Ficarro's second game of a 
30-game schedule in the Mercer 
County Women's League this 
year will be Thursday at 6 : 30 at 
Mercer Park's Field 4. 

Last year, Ficarro's, despite 
being without a regular pitch- 
er since the departure of Clare 
Baxter, finished in a tie for sec- 
ond place with 3 Seasons Sport- 
ing Goods. This year, the pitch- 
ing problem has been solved, 
reports manager Robert 
Smyth, with the acquisition of 
former Princeton High gradu- 
ate Carol Ann Mazzella. 

Mazzella, who pitched 
Ficarro's to victory in the post- 
season Trentonian Tournament 
last year, has previouly pitch- 
ed for both 3 Seasons, which she 
led to a state title and a second- 
place finish in the USSSA East- 
ern Regional Labor Day tourn- 
ament in 1989, and for Grove 
Plumbing. "We are happy to 
have Mazzella ; I've always felt 
that she is one of the top three 
pitchers in New Jersey," said 
Smyth. 

Ficarro's also welcomes two 
more new faces to the lineup 
Karen Wagner, an infielder/ 
outfielder, has played in the 
Mercer Women's League for 
many seasons, and Carla 
Brantley is a former player for 
the Teddy Bears of Union Coun- 

ty Said Smyth: "Karen hits the 
ball hard every time and can 
play every position except 
pitcher. Carla provides us with 



GO WINDOW SHOPPING. 




AND DISCOVER DUETTE IMAGES." 
LIKE NO OTHER WINDOW COVERING 
IN THE WORLD. 

• Designer stripes, checks and solids 

• The only honeycomb design 

• Energy etticienr 

• Strong and durable 

• Easy care 

• Fits specialty shapes 

• No fraying or sagging 

• Duotorie 

• Two pie. ir sizes 

• No seams, visible cords, or holes 





.<■* '"Hunterfluuglas 



50% OFF 

(true list price) 



iURKEN SUPPLY CO. 

27 Witherspoon Street ■ Princeton, NJ 08540 ■ (609) 924-3076 
UflKEN. BECAUSE TODAY'S HARDWARE STORE IS MORE THAN JUST NUTS & BOLTS. 



• Advertising - Outdoor 

R.C. MAXWELL CO. 396^121 Since 
i894 - Need We Say More' 
PO Box 1200 Trenton 08606 



• Auto Dealers: 

Continued froni Preceding Column 
Chevrolet Sales, Service, Leeilng 

MALEK CHEVROLET 

65 E Broad. Hopewell 466-0878 

CHRYSLER-PLY MOUTH Sales, Service, 

Leasing. BELLE MEAD GARAGE, Rl 206 

Belle Mead 201-359-8131 



CONSUMER 
BUREAU 



oo 



WHO'S WHO 



Princeton's consumer 
Information bank 



i Building Materials & Lumber: • Driveways 



r." • Air Conditioning; 

~ AVAMIAN Sales & Service: 25 Yeats e- 

g rxrence (609)«3 69<M (il no arrs HELTON Chryitor-Plyinoolh 

- 4J3-6969) Auln gates S Service Plymouth, Chrysler , 

< ELITE AIR. INC. Air condmomg & nealrng lia , , 240 nouTe M Hamilton Square 

. Central air conditioning electronic an rngjot t 

s s humidifiers Sales^nstallat.ons H0N0A j^ s ,„ lc#| L ,„| nl) 

§ 4 serwe or, all makes 8 moo* 530-0524 R|CHARDS H0NDA 

S ICE-MAN REFRIGERATION Specializing Routt 9. FieshoM (201)7800666 

He ot the an heating & air condition ME ncEDES-8enz Sales, Service a 

* ing systems Custom duct work lahncalion Leaal MARKHAM MOTORS, LTD 355 GROVER LUMBER CO. Everything lor 

g W hi emergency service, 24 hr com- No G ^, on Av Somrvl 201-685-0800 Builders & Homeowners 1 94 Alexander, 

> putenzed ordering lor pans & equipment Mf£RCE0ES B ENZ Auth Sales Service. Princeton. 9240041 

. Readeraial, commerce & industrial Finan- PafIS & Leasing PRINCETON MOTOR HEATH LUMBER CO. Complete Home 

-j era available Call any time 466_9020 SP0RT INC J D Powers Assoc «alea«1 

jt JOHNS HEATING-AIR CONDITIONING ° n ^ nersnip Cpe,,^ Survey " 2910 

. 1REFIGERATION Sales 8 service wilhm ffl , lavwvl , 7 , jjjao 

Z 24 hrs Duct work Heat pomps Serving p0NTIAC SALES , SERVICE; Rentals. . 

° ~%T?"*k°Z" rVu^M67I») Leasmg S Body Shop TEAM MOTORS. M . . s . CARPET CARE Divisron ol Maid ..„,„„ elect „| C al CONTRACT 452-1383 

I ^^.^T^SSo? s^ "' sUB^RU Sale. . S.™,ce' 5 " °^"™ Efl * ,9 ' 8 ° nM °" ^^^--'S- " 

Z COOLING SYSTEMS. INC. MIDDLESEX FOREIGN CARS 

? ^Z'Sni,', ueaTiun A aip rnNlll ,233 Hw V 27 Somerset (201) 846 7222 
o. R. MITCHELL HEATING 1 AIR CONDI- sponTS 4 SPECIALIST CARS, INC. 
TIONING 25 yarns experience Cenlrat Bur Mefcc( Counl/s on | y aulh , S AAB dealer 



for the WISE CONS UME* ^ , which# 

W The .oca. buolne*, people listed be ow « J*^ u "^ pllllnt kno wn to Consumer / 
means they have not even one valid >"'» ati8,ied D e J us '°^ consumers-) 
Bureau. (Please se - *.'™ ■■Our Promise to PrlncetonCo^^L. 



Continued from Preceding Column 



Building Center ■ Delivery Service. 
1580 N Olden Av Trenton. 392-1166 

Carpet & Rug Cleaning: 



(see '"Paving Co ntractors") 

Electrical Contractors: 

ALAN CHECH ELECTRICAL CONTR. 

Design. Install 8. Service 
Lie #6452 Princeton area 924-4848 
JOHN CIFELLI ELECTRICAL CONTRAC- 
TOR Installations & rprs Rsdil & cmmrcl 
Insured & bonded N.J Lie No 4131 
921-3238 



BARLOWS HALLMARK & STA- 
TIONERY Cards, gilts, gourmet candy, in- 
vitations, executive gifts Plamsboro Town 
Center, Plamsboro .- 



Commercial, Industrial, 
6900, Lwrvl 



q conditioning installed Service on ail makes 



w 7i£ 20 A ' C,IC Pk " v T,en,on 
: i 58 /"']?* 2»W HONDA Sales & Service 



7222 



HEATING 



AIR ' 



PRECISION AIR, MfcAllNU a aim ~£. -„ p , Airnortt 683-0722 

CONDITIONING Energy tf.rc.eni central /^ MAZDA s.,„ WnX 
neatmg Scoolmg systems Sales, service R 206 p , Airport) 924-9330 

& installation. 24-hr emergency service : LtX t-L-L 

Fiee estimates Financing available # fl uto p flrts Dealers. 
MasterCard & Visa 888-2127 w !!.,«,„„ .7 .! , - 

PRINCETON FUEL OIL CO. ACRES AUTO INC. Used auto parts 

-on Alexander St Prn 924-1100 74 Youngs Rd. MercerviHe 586-3225 

T M.F. HEATING A AIR CONDITIONING OUAKERBRIOGE AUTO PARTS New & 
^ales servce & installation on all makes rebuilt aulo parts lor American & Imports 
models Free Bstimatas Fully insured 9.R? n .Z. days ,01 Sloaf1 V ' 



Daily Services Eslab 1978 Dry c 
carpet cleaning Recommended by carpel 
manufacturers world wide Please call 
4434844 

MACK'S CARPET CLEANING Carpet & 
upholslery cleaning. Wall panels, 
bathroom & complete home cleaning Fully 
insured. All work guaranleed Serving 
Pri nceton area 35 yrs 3932122 

• Carpet & Upholstery Cleaning: # Employment Agencies: 

RICK'S CHEM-DRY CARPET CLEANING j & j TEM p 0fi ARIES 

The Area's Busiest Agency" 



• Formal Wear; Rentals & Sales: 



TORS INC 

Residential 

NASSAU ELECTRIC Installation & repairs PINO'S FORMAL WEAR & TAILORING 

Residential & commercial, service Pnncelon Markellair. Rt 1(609)452-09^1 

upgrading, trouble shooting, outlels install- Reeky Hi". Village Sn0D l^™ J! ,, , 
ed Fully insured, licensed & bonded. Free 



Please call 924-8823 or 



CoJlfnued irom Preceding Column 
JUST BECAUSE FLOWER SHOP 

Creative floral arrangements, plants, fruit piainsboto 275-4606 

baskets Rl 27, Prn 201-821-7077 & ^treE & EVELYN OF LONDON 
497-9199 „„„ The |j nes t imported soaps, fragrances &•. 

PERNA'S PLANT & FLOWER SHOP ™™ f f s Go ^ rrne , ]a ms, cookies, can- 
Good selection ol fresh cul flowers Roral ^Sc uSiom ma de gift baskets; Corporale 
arrangements Blooming & lohage planls pa|mef ^^^ west, Princeton 

Annuals, perennials, vegetable & herb y_ 92d . 938e 

plants. 189 Washington Rd. Pnncelon. c l Rra ( T , VE HANDS American handcrafted 
pottery, glass, wood & lewelry. 
Montgomery Shop Ctr. Rle. 206 

Rocky Hill 924-3355 

EBONY & IVORY. Clothing, lewelry. gifts.* 
primitive ad. 57 Princeton Av, Hopewell 

466-3966 

THE TOWN SHOP Unique, quality gifts. 
Silver repairs. Personalized service. 344 
Nassau. Princeton. 924-3667 



Mrcvi 



4 hr. emergency service Hlson, 448-4441 8 90 1222 

* Alarm Systems: 

OT SECURITY SYSTEMS Fire, Burolai 

-jld-up. Closed Circi.t Tv. cmmrcl &< .i 

40 Rle 130, Cranbury 655-2200 

AMERICAN SECURITY SYSTEMS f-». 

urglar & panic alarms Why pay more? 

sidential. Commercial Aulomotive 

■ i Francme Or, Trenton 

:«£N PAUL'S INC. F.r< 4 burglar alami ' OWLER'S GULF iiminerly Pnncelon EV 

,-jems 24-hr cenl/a) stai'on moi ■ ■ I Foreign & Domestic repairs VW 

J|ving p„ ( : ' ■ . ' illst, NJ Insp Cir 271 Nassau St 



• Auto Repairs & Service: 

AAMCO TRANSMISSIONS 

■ i, g & 22 point free mulli check 
1701 Princeton Av Trenlon. .599-3990 
DARIO'S IMPORTED CAR SERVICE 
Specializing <n imported car repairs 
NIASE 299 Hillcresl Av, Ewmg Twp 
396-5538 



jtimates 107 fii 
^37-1362 



31 N. Pennmgtoi 



• Antique Dlrs; Auctioneers: 

LESTER & ROBERT SLA TOFF, lm 

Auclioneers • Dealers Appraisers. Lee 
iLirers, Antiques. Households, Estates. 
Silver, Jewelry, China. Glass: Bought & 
Sold, 777 West St are, Trenton. 393-4 848 gp^'j SPEC |ALIST CARS, INC. 

• i .■ Mercer County's only aulh SAAB dealer 

Hniiques. 20 Arc(|C pkwy Tron | 0f1 999.7222, 

FIELD ANTIQUES. l8lh & 19lh Century 

Amec & Englist. Antiques Parking Avail # AutO Waxing & Detailing: 



Prn 921-9707 
LARINI'S SERVICE CENTER 24 hr low 
ing 272 Alexander St Prn 924-B553 
LEE MYLES Free Check II, Free Towing 
959 Rl 130 E Windsor .448-0300 

JOSEPH J. NEMES & SONS Inc. Com 
plele .iulo service 1233 Hwy 206 North. 
Princeton (near Rle 518 traffic light) 
924-4177 



, ELEGANTE AUTO DETAILING 

Year 'round aulo waxing; inferior sham- 
poo, scratch removal; leather repair; In- 
surance claims US 1 & Washington Rd, 
Princeton (609) 452-1131. 



49 Stale Rd Princeton. . 921-0303 
KINGSTON ANTIQUES Fine Jewelry & 

Antiques 43 Mam Kingston. 924-0332 & 

924-3923 
TOMATO FACTORY ANTIQUE CENTER 

30 Shops Open ' Jays wk lil 5 pm 

Period. Country & Oak Furniture, Fine Ac - Dal L rn( , me . 

cessones & Collectibles Rl 516. Hopewell •OainrOOms. 

(hallway between Princeton & Lambertville) M.J. GROVE PLUMBING & HEATING 

609-466-2990 ' 466-9660 * 466-9833 55 N Main, Windsor 448-6063 

NASSAU KITCHEN & BATH CO. 

• Antiques: Restoration: ri 206 at Mouniamview Plaza. 

ANGELO RArtfO « MSSOCtATCO trtpem 

refinishmg, upholstering & caning On site 

touch up & repair Limited on-site building 

restoration Pnncelon area 683-5525 

1-800-525-5745 
TAGUE'S ANTIQUE RESTORATION All , . Dopllrfopi „ n . 

work professionally done by hand. Special- • DBllHUD n 8 surfacing. 

izing in gold leal, upholstery, furniture SAVE YOUR TUBt Professional Resurtac- 

repair & refinishmg Home esiimates. Pick mg Fiberglass 8, Porcelain. Tubs Retinish 



Cleans without steam or shampoo Dries 
in 1 hr "Stays clean longer " Non-loxic & 
safe lor children & pels. Salislaction 
guaranteed Recommended lor use by 
major carpet manufacturers. 10% off with 
this ad 924-4085 

SERVICEMASTER OF NASSAU Carpet & 
upholstery cleaning. Vinyl floor & drapery 
cleaning. Fre e estimates 921-1993 

• Carpet & Rug Shops: 

G. FRIED CARPET OF PRINCETON 

Karastan-Bnjeluw & all major brands. 
Carpet & iwy. at discount prices. 
Pnncelon Shopping Center 
N. Harrison 51 683-9333 

LOTH FLOORS & CEILINGS Karaslan 
Bigelow, Lee, others 208 Sanhican Dr 
Trenlon, 393 9201 

OLDEN PAINT & CARPET Savings up to 
60% on ca/pel & vinyl floor coveringll 
1628 N Olden Av, Ewing Twp396-3528 

PTK ORIENTAL RUO CENTER (609) 883- 
6666 "Largs ' direct importers of the finest 
Persian & Oriental rugs " Sales • Trade- 
ins • Repairs • Cleaning 2817 Brunswick 
Av (All US l Soufh) Lawrenceville 

• Caterers: 

ANGELONI'S Catering. Banquet & party 
facilities lot over 600 1445 Whilehorse- 
Mercrvl. Rd , Hamilton Sq 566-4100. 

COX'S DELI & MARKET Hoi & cold bul- 
lets, office luncheons, parties, etc, 180 
Nassau St Princeton 924-6269 

GOURMET DELICATESSEN & BAKERY 
Catering • hot & cold buflet. 6 It hoayies, 
cakes, cookie trays & much morel Prn - 
Highlslown Rd . Prn Jcl 799-0223: 

MRS. PASTA . DELI Special catering rates 
lor Ihe Holidays Breaklasl, Cheesesieaks, 
Subs, Party platters Dinners, Holiday 
Roast Pigs 1 75 Washington Rd Princeton 
452-91 75, Fax 452-0202 



(609)924-6277 
Trenton 1141 Hamilton Av(609) 392-2188 
Yar dley, Pa 25 S MainSf{215)493-1452 

• Fuel Oil & Oil Burners: 

LAWRENCEVILLE FUEL Fuel oil, plmbg, 
hlng, air cond. & energy audits 16 Gor- 
don Av, Lincvl. 896-0141. 
NASSAU OIL Sales & Service 
655-3366 800 Slale Rd.. Prn 924-3530. 



600 Alexander Rd, Pnncelon452-2030 & 

Applegarlh & Prospect Plains Rds. 

Cranbury. 655-3366 

STAFF BUILDERS TEMPORARY PRINCETON FUEL OIL CO. 
EMPLOYMENT SERVICE Serving Ihe 22 Alexander St. Pm 924-1100. 

Route 1 Corridor. 211 College Rd. E , 

Forreslal Ctr Princeton 452-0020 



Furniture Oealers: 

GASIOR'S FURNITURE 



• Gourmet Shops & Foods: 

FIDOLER'S CREEK FARM Country smok- 
ed bacon, turkeys & capons. Mail Order. 
R D 1 . Trtusvtile 737-0685 (local) 

• Gutters & Gutter Cleaning: 

MOVER'S ROOFING & SHEET METAL 

Built-in gutters Seamless gutters - 
aluminum & copper. Gutter repairs & 
cleaning. New roofs, re-rools & repairs. 
921-7729 



AC- 



• Exterminators: 

BEST - T/A MONROE PEST CONTROL 

General Pes) Conlrol & Termites 

Radon Testings Real I Estate Certification ^ " ^j£~ ^MEfllCAN FURNITURE 
24-Hour Emergency Service 655-8330 
BUG-OFF SYSTEMS, INC. Exterminating 
& pesl control Five-year termite warranties 
Locally owned & operated 921-3367 



• Handbags; Leathergoods: 

CESSORIES 2152 'Rle 206, Belle Mead SUSAN GREENE Largest selection ot 

201-874-8383 (local call). handbags, tashion jewelry, luggage & at- * 

" laches, all at low discount prices. At Ihe 

CO. INC. Fabulous furniture al incredible Marketplace, Princeton, Routes 27 & 518, 

discount pncesi Marketplace. Rt. 27 & 516 201-297-6249^ 

Prn, 201-422-7898 



rn^n°*S«T CONTROL 2 Graduate RIDER FURNITURE Rle 27. Kingston. The O Hardware StOWS: 

< SSSLS S I^SS!!^^SSi P lace ,0bu V' o n | ?Z?f- L' u,nishin 9 sa,d,s - LUCAR Pan), hdwre, tools, plumbing & 
count prices! 924-0147. elec 3^. houswrs. Open eves Prn- 



Entomologist Rendering quality service 
since 195*>. focal Call 799-1300 
NATIONWIDE EXTERMINATING SER- 
VICE Locally owned & operated since 
1955. All work guaranteed in writing, 
452-1023. 



• Fabrics: 

TRENTON HOME FABRICS Over 1 million 
yards in stock at discount prices Visit our 

£S?SSr ' 66 ' " »'^o ^ToT^Ffinishino service 

twing lownsnip Richard W Cain Furniture repairs & 



• Furniture Repairing & 

Refinishing: 

ANGELO RAIMO & ASSOCIATES Expert 
refinishing, upholstering & caning. On site 
touch up & repair. Limited on site building 
restoration. Princeton area 663-5525, 
1-800-525-5745 



Histn Rd., Prn Jnctn. (local call) 799-0599 / 

• Health Care Facilities: * 

FEATHERBED LANE REST HOME 

Licensed residential health care facility 
Long term care, weekend care & senior 
day care. 23 Featherbed La, Hopewell 
466-9808 or 466-1450 

• Health & Diet Food Products: 



• Fencing: 

THE INVISIBLE FENCE CO. OF 

PRINCETON Veterinarian approved & 

recommended Serving Mercer, Somerset, 

Middlesex. Monmouth & Hunterdon Coun- 
ties, since 1983 924-5225 
JERSEY WHOLESALE FENCE CO., INC. 

Family owned & operated over 25 yrs. 

Jerith aluminum fence. Custom wood & 

split rail Chain link. Tennis court fencing 

& pool enclosures Portable kennels. Elec- # Futons 



=^^e=^. i™™rszz?%r£x£ 



delivery Iree esiimates. Rle. 206, Belle 
Mead. Call lor directions. 201-359-5206 



• Furniture Unpainted: 

ERNEY'S UNFINISHED FURNITURE One 448.4885! 
ol Ihe largest selections o( unfinished fur- 
niiure in New Jersey. 2807 Rte 1 Alternate, 
Lawrenceville. 530-0097 



total heallh. Vitamins, organic produce, « 
bulk foods, freshly ground peanut butter & 
coffee, Herbs & Homeopalhic remedies. 
Natural beauly produefs, books & 
literature. Open 7 days. Warren Plaza West * 
al Rt. 130, Hightstown Please call 



• Heating Contractors: 

AIR DIMENSIONS, INC. 

High-efficiency systems designed and in- 



ouaker maid kitchens by fleet- • Meaning; Onn 

WOOD. 32 years experience Custom CRAFT CLEANERS, 

designs and mslallation. 20 Rl 206. 
flaritan 201-722-0126. 



;s?Sae^r - Tre - ^s=°" s <- -^si,s?;;r 



up& delivery. 207 CtosswicksRd Borden 
town 298-7912 
ROBERT WHITLEY 
MASTER OF ANTIQUE FURNITURE 
RESTORATION 
Repairing, refinishmg, veneer & 
inlay work Carving, gold leafing, 
old finish preservation 
Near New Hope 215-297-6452 



ed. Done in your home Chips Repaired. 
Insured * Over 10 years quality service. 
(609) 448-3339 or toll Iree 1(800) 
339-4TU B 

• Beauty Salons: 

ANGLES-THE ORIGINAL NY, London 
Vidal Sassoon & Jingles Int'l. (rained stall 
236 Nassau, Prn 924-6800 

BARBRA'S STUDIO A premiere designer, 
Vidal Sassoon 
Hopewell 466-3966. 



The Finest!" 

225 Nassau. Princeton 924-3242 

Windsor Plaza. Prn. Junction, .799-0327 
Windsor Hts. Shop, Ctr, 

East Windsor 443-8320 

1840 Rt 1, Lawrence Twp. .. 695-3242 
LUXE FRENCH DRY CLEANERS 
Dry clng, laundry, pick-up & delivery. 
Prn Junction. Prn-Hlsln Rd 799-0716 

• Computer Sales & Service: 

ENTRE COMPUTER 

Specializing in computers lor business 
IBM, COMPAQ, TANDON, TOSHIBA 
47 State Road, Princeton 663-4141 



SUBURBAN FENCE COMPANY. 

2nd & 3rd generation lamily business. 
100's of styles, 2 locations. Princeton 
Junction & Trenton 452-2630, 

TRU-LINE FENCING Offering complete 
lencing services to ihe Princeton area. 
"Our no money down policy assures your 
satisfaction " Wood, chain link & specializ- 
ing in Jerilh Aluminum Ornamental fenc- 
ing. Please call (or Iree estimate. 452-7072 

YORK FENCE CONSTRUCTION 
Specializing in cedar lencing custom built 
on site. Residential & commercial wood & 
chain link lence systems. Serving Pnncelon 
& vicinity over 10 yrs. Fully insured. Free 
estimates, 359-2976 or 369-2266 



Pnncelon 609-497-1000. 



• Garage Doors & Openers 

MILLER, WILLIAM Repairs S new mslalla- 
tion! Automatic door openers serviced & Ewmg 882-1281 

installed. Princeton Junction, 799-2193 ICE-MAN REFRIGERATION Specializing 
in state of the 



perience. 609-443-6904 (II no ans: 
443-6989) 

GERARD M. KUSTER HEATING & 
COOLING SYSTEMS, INC. 



• Fish; Seafood: 

NASSAU STREET SEAFOOD CO. Fresh 
(ish daily; caviar, fresh game, homemade 



• Garbage & Trash Removal: 

NATIONAL WASTE DISPOSAL, Inc. 

Resdntl, Indstrl, Comrcl, Municipal 
Serving Princeton area (local call) 883-1420 

• Garden Centers: 

AGWAY-BELLE MEAD FARMERS CO-OP 

(201)359-5173. Lawn 8. garden head- 



heating & air condition- 
ing systems. Custom duct work labrication 
24 hr. emergency service. 24 hr. co* 
puterized ordering for parts & equipment 
Residential, commercial & industrial. Finan- 
cing available. Call any time. 466-9020 

NASSAU OIL Sales & Service 
800 Slate Rd,, Prn 924-3530. 

PRINCETON FUEL OIL CO. 
220 Alexander St, Prn. 924-1100, 



quarters. Chemicals * Garden Fencing * # Hobby ShODS" 

«,(•«*, * Bulbs * Fertilizers * Sprays & ,__„ „..., u/mTbim ^ , ■ . 

Tools. Line Rd. off U.S. 206, Belle IR0N , HORSE HOBBIES Central Jersey 



Hand Tools. I 
Mead. 



,,,,, i .... er. • Copying; Duplicating: 

_ appliance nepair. Vjda) gas^r, (rained 57 princeJon Av. s & A DUPLICATING INC 

ACCURATE APPLIANCE REPAIR & Hopewell 466-3966. KODAK duplicating & ottset printing, Spiral 

PARTS Serving Pnncelon area 24 hrs. 7 FRENCH CONNECTION ENCORE Binding & Therma Binding on premises. 

days. Service & mslallation ol all major ap- Full Service Salon, Princeton Forreslal Blueprinting 5 Independence Way, Rl. 1. ^ ri n . _ . NG i NC All Ivdps nl shmhs ft tr^ ■ „ 

P l . iance !-^_ flumidlfie,s&wa ' erhe9,e ' s - village, 211 Rockingham Row.987-8770 p fifl ceton, 924-7136 and 967-0655 • Floor Covering Contractors: !^oieSVriceVi?BveSrunoSfr • Home Improvement & Repair: 

OLDEN PAINT & CARPET Savings up lo ing lor everyone's needs Spotswood- AST BUILDING COMPANY Addilions, 
60% on carpet & vinyl floor covering!! Englishtown Rd, Jamesburg. 201- remodeling, kitchens, bathrooms, ceramic 



pasta, catering 256 Nassau, Prn921 -0620 BRUNSWICK NURSERY & LANDSCAP. 



most complete Hobby Shop. Flock 81 
Quaker Bridge Rds., Mrcvl 586-2282 



201-247-7565 



appliance master, inc. Same Day • Bedding: » Decks: 

^°'^^ a !S^ f & S^rSS^ WH,TE L0TUS FUT0N 6 Chambers St, ARCHADECK Founded 1979. Wooden 1628 N. Olden Av, Ewing Twp396-3528 446-3736 m. . ■ .,. .i.ntf, driveways & all types of 

' iceto n 609-497-1000. p^lo 4 poo) decks, gazebos, screen TILE DISCOUNT CTR. Vinyls, Ceramics. MAZUR NURSERY & FLOWER SHOP masonry. Roofing & siding, 396-4319 & 



on All Brands ot Major Appliances. 
Authorized by 26 Manulacturers. "Lei Us 



Billiards: 



porches, benches & planters. "Strongest 
warranty in the industry." Call lor a Iree 



AVAMIAN - Expert serv.ee on major ap- H P BS0 „ N ; SBILLIAnD4RKreB ^ c n Q S P'y D d f ^ % £t u *T™ JZlli™ D 
„i. a n™ fino^.fian,! rn ™ 3 ns ^^ * Service > 35 V'S exp , 565-6898 R.A. McCORMACK COMPANY Beaulilul 



Carpeting, Capitol Plaza Shop Ctr., Tren. 
(15 min Irom Prn.) 392-2300. 



pliances- 609-443-6904 
443-6989) 

FAIRHILLS APPLIANCE REPAIR Expert 
repairs on major appliances Serving LENTINE MARINE Hwy 31. 
Mercer County 609-393-3072 Remington 201-782-2077. 



• Boat Sales & Service: 



custom wood decks oi iiieiime guaranteed # Floor Laying & Refinishing: 

"WoJmanized" pressure treated wood, red AH0 LD'S HARDWOOD FLOORING 0BAL Q*BOEN MARKET INC. Residential & .commercial!' 888-451 

.1 11 „ 1 1 1 1 m l.ii Yi ,nr rleeinn nr rmrs hi nil _ _ _ T . •-—•'■■■■"»■. p.^A.. i-., ,|__ . ., ,__—_. , cdiui/ uronu.ii r»j-» .. ■, . i 



Fresh cut flowers. Grower of annuals, 394-3877 

perennials, vegetables herb plants. Indoor DYNAMIC DESIGN General contractor, 

plants. Pottery. Garden supplies. Open Kitchens. Baths, additions. Decks, Ander- 

year 'round. 265 Baker's Basin Rd. sen windows & doors. Finished 

Lawrenceville. 587-9150 basements. Heating & air conditioning. 



• Art Galleries: • Bookstores: 

THE MAGENTA GALLERY: Fine art tor THE BOOK PEDDLERS 

home & office Consultations • Custom Small & special with extra good service! 

Framing. 131 Washington Si. (Rle. 518 23 W. Delaware Av, Pennington 737-3099 

across from P.O.) Rocky Hill 924-3513 CRANBURY BOOK WORM - Used Book 

Specialist, rare & out ol print; bought and 

• AutO Body Repair Shops: sold Records, magazines 7 days wk 
ACRES AUTO, INC. - Expert rprs 54 N. Mam, Cranbury 655-1063. 

74 Youngs Rd, MercerviHe. . 586-3225 » q.-u- „ r„„«,„»»-_-. 

body shop By Harold Williams. • Building Contractors. 

Specializing in Fiberglass, Corvette All EDWARD BUCCI BUILDERS, Inc. 

domestic & foreign cars Route 206. Custom builder Office & home. 924-0908 

Princeton. 921 -8585 Building m Princeton & vicinity (or 35 years 

CLASSIC BODY WORKS Specializing in FRANK W. Dl BIASE & SON, INC. 

collision repairs on new model cars. FREE Residential Design/Builder of New Homes 9 Draperies & Curtains' 

r r-jTllisirin rinaivnsrs - Additions - Renovations Ask lor our ^ 



wood oi cedar Your design or ours built 
by a craftsman. 1458 River Rd, Titusville 
737-6563 

RIVERVIEW CONSTRUCTION Custom 
built cedar decks • Additions • Basements 
• Kitchens & baths • Fireplaces • 
Andersen doors 8, windows. Professional 
quality 737-3959 

• Delicatessens: 

COX'S DELI & MARKET 

180 Nassau St. Princeton 924-6269 
MRS. PASTA . DELI Breaklast, 
Cheesesieaks, Subs, Party platters. Hot 
food, salad bar, Dinners. Catering. Holiday 
Roast Pigs 1 75 Washington Rd. Princeton 
452-9175, Fax 452-0202 



INC. Sanding, Refinishing. 

Repairs. Sales & installation ot hardwood 



Everything lor the garden. Alexander Road FRANK HERDMAN CO. All types of repairs 

... « nt™^' pnnce,on ' "52-2401 & additions. Rooling. Siding, Painting & 

floors. Bruce. Hartco, Tarketl, etc Free ^tehson S NURSERY & LAND- papering Insurance restoration work, 

estimates fully insured Shop at home ser- SCAPING - Est. 1939. Complete Garden 397-8687 

vice 908-422-7720 Center -Creative Landscape Oesign 3730 E.J. KETTENBURG & SONS, INC., 

Lawrenceville Rd, Prn 924-5770 Building contractors. "Better buill since 

• Floor Waxing: STONY BOOK GARDENS Quality garden 1924," New homes, additions & 

ALLSTATE CLEANING Has your kitchen t^^Tutf ^h T^*™ ^ pp^ ' i^S!., , 

floor tost its shine? "We can restore your n '^" k °' ,' f f eS ' Sh UbS ' greens, PRICE & MAZZONI Interior-exTerior 

no-wax or vinyl floor lo look like new Just £'T'T oI iag B e plan,s & 0,cnids - mwn enance. Remodeling, restorations & 

beautiful! Brilliant shine guaranteed in % ^fi ^'j* & accessories Pottery. * 
writing to lasl one full year " Wood floors m ' aton L, , linn ™ '%« «£ Pann " 
expertly cleaned and polished loo. For in 9' on »»■) Pen nington 737-7644 
Iree, no obligation estimates, call 586-5833 # Gazebos* 



flatbed towing tor collision cuslomers 

308 Mercer St. (Rt 33) Hlstn. 448-5815 
DEALERS AUTO BODY Collision experts 

Foreign & Domestic Glass installed 

Woodside Rd , Robbmsville. .259-6390 
"MIKE'S" BUDMAN ALIGNMENT & 

BODY WORKS Expert Frame * Body * E.J. KETTENBURG & 



Unibooy colli&on rprs 9 Industry Ct 

Trenlon .... 882-0686 

QUAKER BRIDGE BODY SHOP. Amer & 
Forcgn Cars. FREE ESTIMATES. 4130 
Quaker Br Rd Lawrenceville. 799-3119 

• Auto Dealers: 

ACURA Auth. Sales, Service, Leasing 

ACURA ol PRINCETON 

3001 Rt. 1, Lawrenceville 895-0600 
AUDI & PORSCHE Sales & Service. 

Holbetf s Porsche Audi. Inc 1425 Easton 

Rd.. Warnngton, Pa. 

Hope 21 5-343-2890 
BAKER PONTIAC-BUICK 

Rte 206, Princeton (opp airport) 

Sales 921-2222 . Service 921-2400 
CATHCART PONTIAC 

1620 N OkJenAv. Trenton 392-5111 

"Cortinusd m Htrxt Column 

.. - . 



Additions - Renovations Ask for our 

brochure" 609-443-3833 

ECHO Construction Inc. Residential & 

commercial Renovations, additions & new 

construction Fully insured. "A tradition ol 

quality " Call lor Iree estimate 921-3721 

" SONS, INC. 

Iter built since 

additions & 



(see "Window Trealments") 



• Florists: 

COUNTRY FLORIST & GREENHOUSE 

Fresh flowers, balloons, fruit baskets 
315 Rt 33, Hlsln. 448-0222, 

Continued In Next Column 



R.A. McCORMACK COMPANY Built by 
craftsmen Many size, shape & material op- 
tions, octagons, rectangles, ovals 
Available with screens Ask about our pool 

™ a I!?£ 145fl River Rd > Titusville. 
r 37-6563 



additions. Slate, tin, shingle & rubber roof- 
ing. French doors, windows, decks S 
siding, 587-9721 or 393-7109 
SMITH BUILDERS All types ol custom 
carpentry. Residential, commercial, in- 
dustrial, additions, alterations, renovalions, 
tire & historic design, planning, Custom 
built homes. Licensed contractor. Free 
estimates, Fully insured. Serving Princeton 
area. 799-9112 



Building contractors 

1924 " New homes, 

renovating, 466-0309 
NICK MAURO & SON, BUILDERS, INC. 

Custom homes; additions, alterations; tile 

924-2630 
WESS & SON 

Additions & Remodeling 

Custom-built homes • Siding • Rooling 

448-1100 & 586-6668 

• Building Materials & Lumber 

iles from New APEX LUMBER MART Lumber, windows, 
doors, kitchen cabinets & much more! We 
charge only 3V*% N.J. Sales Tax! 

651 S Broad. Trenlon 695-6800 

COLEMAN'S HAMILTON SUPPLY CO. 
Klockner Rd, & E. State, Mrcvl. 587-4020 
Continued In Next Column 



Continued in Next Column 



*0UR PROMISE TO PRINCETON CONSUMERS: 



cKfs^ T^ r PR ° BLE p M ** a " y local busln8ss fl ™' l usl 
call 924-8223 and a Consumer Bureau representative will respond 

and m 9 cases out ol 10 see that the problem Is resolved to 
everyone's satistaction; however '»=>uivea ro 

pX,' F C ? NSUMER BUREAU'S ALL-CONSUMER VOLUNTEER 

«,t h L l?™^ reco , mm8ndi *>" 'o the business firm Involved, the 

hL^nm* r 06 °' K " 1 T' yln9 "^ *" «**>mmendation or be"g 
barred from the Consumer Bureau Register. 

J5£ !? D0N d" T STAY MAD * m * busl "«* n™ - until you first 
(6031324-8223 any time of any day or night to start the ball rolllngl 




CONSUMER 
BUREAU 



OO 



II. 'I ■ i '. I , Ml, ,, 



JOSEPHINE WEBB 

, Consumer Bureau 
Executive Director 



YOUR LOCAL CONSUMER 
INFORMATION BANK 

ESTABLISHED 1967 



• NOT a government agency 

• NOT i Better Buslnass Bureau 



from 



CONSUMER BUREAU'S 





CONSUMER 
BUREAU 



• Restaurants: 

Continued from Preceding Column 



Swimming Pools & Supplies: i 

Continued from Preceding Column 



oo 



of Recommended LOCAL BUSINESS PEnPi f 

Lawn Maintenance: 



• Home Improvement & Repair: 

Continued from Preceding Column 

SOUDERS, RAYMOND L., Jr., Inc. 

* RepaJrs»Alterations*Additions»Bathrooms 
Kitchens'Family rooms»Over 25 years ex- 
perience. 896-1156 

TRIPLE H CONSTRUCTION Remodeling. 
Additions. Home repairs. Painting, Drywall. 
Decks. Odd jobs. 24-hr. emergency ser 



SINCE 1967 



S^7or^3SrS»rSiS!o" Renovanons ,n -9'^ nd & ^bove-ground g 
GOOD T?ME SharTIv^ P 00 " 5 Cornple,e line ^ ^PP 1165 Openings j£ 

" ' J "'■' ' & closings Over 20 years' experience z 

397-2182 . 

SPARKLING POOLS & SPAS, INC. We O 
service all makes of in-ground pools. Large 2 
variety ol chemicals & supplies All trucks 7" 



ANDREAS LAWN SERVICE, INC. 

Residential & commercial. Lawns cut & 
maintained. Edging & trimming Fertiliza- 
tion & weed control. Fully insured Free 
estimates. 530-0789 
EVERGREEN LANDSCAPING Proles 



• Office Fummire&Equ^j. Dealers: 

ACTION Business Supplies.. 924-3454 

Complete Line ol Office Furniture, Supplies 
ft Business Machines Montgomery Shop- 
ping Center, Rt. 206 8. 518, Rocky Hill 
CENTER STATIONERS Princeton 
Shopping Ctr . N Harrison St. 924-5706 



sional grounds care & landscaping from a n ' NKS ° N s Complete line of office fu. 

ci nn i. i ■ ... . K " a .. ,a niture & SUDORS fi? Ma«an Pn^siA, 



single tree to an entire estate. Walkways 



niture & supplies 82 Nassau, Princeton 
924-0112. 



SSJSS'* =^SSS3 SfBHMH 



estimates. 924-3113 or 394-8287 



sulfation. 924-2209 

HOAGLANDS LANDSCAPE Certified 
horticulturalisl. Lawn & garden 
maintenance, commercial, residential & 
eslafes. Call for Iree consultation 
587-5688. 



Computer furniture ft supplies, 2105 
Nottingham Way. Mrcrvl. 587-5411. 



*• Hospital Beds; Equipment 

AMBEST 

1674 Pennington Rd. Ewing, 882-3702. 
' DELCREST MEDICAL PRODUCTS 

Hospital equipment lor the home. 2100 KUPPEK LAWN ft LANDSCAPING SER- 

Nottingham Way, Hamlin Twp 586-1679 VICES Fertilizing & pesticide programs. 

A Unnca Ploaninn- Mowing. Bed maintenance including bed 

• "HUSO Weaning. edging, mulching & shrub pruning. Fully OLDEN PAINT & CARPET - since 1955 

ADVANCED CLEANING SYSTEMS "isured. Free estimates .737-0760 Save up lo 40%" 1628 N Olden Av Ew 

Residential Cleaning. Weekly, Bi-weekly & LAWN DOCTOR ol PRINCETON ing Twp 39fr3526 

e One time. Pre & post moving cleaning. r ^ ( PENNINGTON & HOPEWELL WINDSOR PAINT & PAPER. Windsor 

Plaza. 64 Highlstown Rd. Princeton 
Junction, 799-2227 



• Organ Dealers: 

NOLDE'S PIANOS ft ORGANS, Inc. 

Hunterdon Shop. Ctr. Rte 202, Remington 
(30 min (rom Pro.) 201-782-5400. 

• Paint & Wallcoverings; Retail: 



lawns & do much more maintenance 
besides." Complete landscaping service 
including plantings, beds, trimming, 
railroad lies & lences. 297-2911 ft 
921-8440 
PROCACCINI LANDSCAPING 4 GAR- 



Carpets, floors & windows. Fully insured. Complete lawn services. 

Free estimates. Greater Princeton area. Ffee Estimates, call 737-8181 

8904165. OMEGA LAWN SERVICE Lawn cutting 

— -— — specialist. Bagging available. Competitive 

• HOUSe Washing: rates. Free estimates. Tree work. Snow 
AQUA-JET INC 396-2100 f _ emoval B Le 5 f 'emoval (Oct-Mar.). Call 

Beautify your home for the Spring or in g^fldTT p ' m " °' leave a messa 9 e al 

preparation for having it painled. We clean pniN 'm ON , 4WM Qcnuinc 

aluminums wood siding, masonry, wood P . HINC£ i'JNLAWn ShRVicfc 
i decks, concrete walks & patios. Residen- 
tial & commercial. 20 years' experience. 
Free estimates, serving the Princeton area 

• Insulation: 

F.M. ROJEK Over 40 years experience. In- 
sulation blown in & batted insulation. 
Upgrade to today's specif cations. Walls & 
ceilings. Please call 566-2048 

• Investments: 

MERRILL, LYNCH, 

PIERCE, FENNER & SMITH 194 Nassau 
St.. Princeton 924-7600 

• Jewelers: 

TERRY PRATICO JEWELERS One of Ihe 

largest selections of jewelry in the area — 
discounted! 660 Plainsboro Rd, Prn. 

- Meadows Shop Ctr 609-275-0018 & 

201-329-9595. 

• Kennels: 

GROOMING BY GAYLE Oog & cat board- 
ing. 20 years' experience. "Plenty of TLCI" 
170 York Rd, Highlstown 426-0559 



._ • Painting & Decorating: 

rates Free estimates. Tree work. Snow ALLEN'S paintiwr* npftTnoATinwc 
removal. Leaf remnvai rnn-Man r*» *>"-*."> PAINTING * RESTORATIONS 



Rsdt'l & cmmrcl. Interior & Exterior. Gut- 
ter cleaning available. Kirk Allen 

,.,„„ 609-771-4189 

nta«T™ ANGLO DECORATIVE FINISHES Glaz- 
ing, gilding: stenciling & wall upholstering. 
Pennington. 737-1789 
BILL'S PAINTING Interior. Exterior, Power 
Washing. Power Sanding. "Very neat 
clean work." Insured. Free estimates. 
497-9299 



QUEREC PAINTING 

Professionals in surface treatments. 

Rocky Hill 924-8718 

SCHATZ & SONS Quality & dependable 
service since 1929. For your complete 
Painting & Decorating needs. Fully In- 
sured, Free Estimates. Yardley, Pa. (215) 
295-1777 



• Lawn Mowers, Garden & 
Farm Equip. Sales & Service: 

GROOMS, R.A. & SON Sales & service 
Residential & commercial mowers. 385 
Ward Streel. E. Windsor Twp. 448-1792 

MOWER RANCH Factory authorized sales 
& service on Snapper. Toro & Bob-Cat. 
Factory authorized dealer (or Briggs & 
Stratton, Tecumseh ft Kohler. Kawasaki 
engines, idc power equipment. Pickup & 
delivery. N. Greenwood Av, Hopewell. 
466-1728 (1 mile north of Broad St.) 

JOSEPH J. NEMES & SONS, Inc. 
Authorized Sales & Service: Simplicity; 
Toro; Bob Cat; While; Homelite; Green 
Machine; Ariens. 1233 Hwy 206 North, 
Princeton 924-4177. 



• Kitchen Cabinet Refacing: 

KORRIDOR KITCHENS by Gary E. 

Wortelman. Custom Relacing o( Cabinets, 
wood & lormica. 587-1738. 
NEW LOOK KITCHENS Kitchen Cabinet 
Refacing Specialist. Free Estimates. Shop- 
al-Home Service. 448-3461 

• Kitchen Cabinets: 

APEX LUMBER MART Custom & in-stock 
cabinels. Wood-Mode. Brammer, Tri-Pac. 
%e charge only 3Vi% N.J. Sales Taxi 
651 S. Broad, Trenton 695-6800 

COLEMAN'S HAMILTON SUPPLY CO. 
Klockner Rd & E. State Mrcvl. 587-4020 

KAPRI KITCHENS, Inc. Professional 
design & installation. 1049 Washington 
Blvd. The Shoppes at Foxmoor. Robbins- 
ville (20 min. from Prn.) 443-661 1 

MILLNER LUMBER CO. Distr. HAAS kit- 
chen cabinels; paneling. 600 Artisan, Tren. 
393-4204. 

NASSAU KITCHEN & BATH CO. 
Rt. 206 at Mountainview Plaza, 
Belle Mead. 201-359-2026. 

QUAKER MAID KITCHENS by FLEET- 
WOOD. 32 years experience. Custom 
designs and installation. 20 Rt. 206. 
Rarilan. 201-722-0126. 



• Landscaping Contractors: 

ALAN LANDSCAPING 

Quality work since 1973. Custom design 
& installation. Residential Commercial. 
Sod. Seed. Mulch, Railroad lie & stone 
walls. Decks Ponds. Pruning. Grading & 
lawn maintenance. 395-1331 
ARMAND'S TREESCAPES Tree work & 
professional landscaping. Create outdoor 
living space. Env. Science degree. 20 yrs.' 
experience. Personalized service Brick 
palios & wood decks. Armand452-0411 
BEAUREGARD LANDSCAPING, INC. 
"Landscaping Irom beginning to end." 
Landscape design Patios Underground 
sprinklers. Planting. New lawns installed. 
Old lawns renovated. Railroad tie work. 
758-0374. 

BELLE MEAD NURSERY Landscape 
design & installation. Patios, walks, land- 
scape lighting, sod & lawn sprinkling 
systems. Serving Central Jersey lor over 

15 yrs. Local call 359-1898 

BLACKMAN LANDSCAPING - Plantings 
& terraces professionally planned & ex- 
ecuted. Princelon 609-683-4013. 

EVERGREEN LANDSCAPING Profes- 
sional grounds care & landscaping from a 
single tree to an entire estate. Walkways 
lo waterfalls. Lawn maintenance. Serving 
Princeton area lor 10 yrs Call tor tree con- 
sultation. 924-2209 

GREENWOOD LANDSCAPING Since 
1976. Full service design & implementa- 
tion. Guaranteed work & Iree consultation. 
Serving Princeton & vicinity Call us al 
1-600-729-3021 or 397-1951 
HIDDEN VALLEY NURSERY, INC. Since 
1951. N.J. certified landscape architects lo 
prepare landscape development plans- 
Contractors for construction, materials & 
detailed landscape plantings. 60 acres 
quality nursery stock lor wholesale & retail 

sales. Rt. 29, Stockton 397-1080 

PRINCETON LAWN SERVICE Complete 
^nascapifig service including plantings. 
°eds, trimming, railroad ties & fences. "We 
[now lawns & do much more maintenance 
besides " 297-2911 or 921-8440 
STRUCTURAL LANDSCAPES, Inc. 
Landscape Design & Installaiion of Plants, 
Patios. Decks & Walks West Windsor 
443-5858 



• Lawn Sprinkler Systems: 

HILLSBOROUGH IRRIGATION Toro lawn 
sprinkler systems. Installation, service & 
parts. Also a do-it-yourself retailer. Residen- 
tial ft commercial. Serving Central Jersey 
for over 1 5 years. Free estimates. Local call 
359-1898 

• Lighting Fixtures: 

THE LIGHT GALLERY Indoor & Outdoor 
Fixtures. Residential, Commercial and 
Industrial. Prn. Shop. Ctr 924-6878 

• Limousine Service: 

A-1 LIMOUSINE 22 yrs of professional 

service. 24 hrs. a day. 

Door-to-door. 924-0070 
CROWN LIMOUSINE SERVICE 

Serving the Princeton Area. 448-2001. 
GRAYTOP PRINCETON LIMOUSINE. 

Cadillac Sedans & Limousines (or Cor- 

porateypersonal travel .921-1122. 

• Liquor Stores: 

PLAINSBORO PACKAGE STORE Over 
8,000 fine wines; liquor, beer. Delivery. 
Schalks Crossing Rd.Plns'boro 799-0989 

• Locksmiths: 

BLAKE'S MOBILE LOCKSMITHS & 

SECUHITY CENTER Sates Service. In- 
stallation Home. Auto. Business. Quality 
Burglar Alarms. Visa & MasterCard Ac- 
cepted Associated Locksmiths of 
America. 24 hr. emergency service. 
799-1188 or 586-2716 

• Mason Contractors: 

ACME MASONRY SERVICE Masonry 
repaired, brick pointing, waterproofing. 
Chimney Specialist. Fireplace repairs. 
586-0394 

BALDINO, VINCENT & BROS. Mason 
contractor. All types of stone work. Brick, 
block, stone, stucco. Fireplaces a special- 
ty. Residential & commercial. Serving the 
Princeton area for over 22 years. 
Princeton. 921-6512 

DESTEFANO BROS. All types of masonry 
Block, brick, concrete, stone. Patios. Brick 
Pavers. Foundations, steps, sidewalks & 
fireplaces, etc. Specializing in residential 
work. Fully insured. Free estimates. 
924-7424 

KARSEVER'S MASONRY Specializing in 
brick, block, stone & concrete work. Curb- 
ing, foundations, steps, uieplaces. "High 
quality, reasonable prices." Free 
estimates. Fully insured. Residential & 
commercial 443-4094 



OV" To find dependable local 
services, check these Town 
Topics -WHO'S WHO' pages and 
look for this seal: 



elsewhere In Town Topics and 
other local newspapers and In lo- 
cal yellow pages and/or call us 
Mon.-Fri., 9-5:30, for up-to-date 
Register information about any 
local business firm. 

CONSUMER BUREAU 

Established 1967 

152 Alexander St., Princeton. 

(609)924-0737 



• Painting & Paper Hanging: 

ANGLO PAPERHANGING & PAINTING 

CO. Gilding. Stenciling. Wall upholstering. 

Over 20 yrs. experience. Free estimates. 

Pennington 737-1789 
DANNY'S PAINTING. Exterior-interior. Ful- 
ly insured. Free estimates. Water Pressure 

Washing. 921-7835. 
GROSS, JULIUS H. interior & Exterior 

painting; paper hanging. Oecorating. 

Owner operated for over 30 yrs. in Prn. 

area 924-1474. 
J&R PAINTING & DECORATING Interior 

ft Exterior. Wallpapering Carpentry. Sheet 

Rock. Tape Work. Fully Insured. 466-9033 
PERONE, B.R. Painling & Decorating 

921-6468. 

• Party Supplies: 

PARTY HARTY - Huge selection ol party 
goods! Complete party planning available, 
incl. caterers & entertainment. So. Bnjns. 
Sq. Mall, 4095 Rt. 1. Mon. Jctn. 
201-274-2442. 



• Moving & Storage: 

ANCHOR MOVING & STORAGE Agents 
lor Mayflower. Let our family move your 
ramily. Route 206 Commerce 
Columbus 298-7877 

BOHREN'S Moving & Storage. Local & 
long distance moving S storage United 
Van Li nes Auth. Agt. Princeton 452-2200 . 

• Mufflers: 

JOSEPH J. NEMES & SONS, Inc. Mufflers 
lor loreign & domestic cars. 100 percent 
guarantee 1233 Hwy206 North, Pnnceton 
(near Rte. 518 traffic light) 924-4177 

• Nurses: 

STAFF BUILDERS HEALTH CARE 
SERVICES 

Home Health Care Professionals. 
21 1 College Rd. E.. Forrestal Center 
Pnnceton 452-0020 



• Paving Contractors: 

B & S ASPHALT PAVING Driveways & 
parking lots Graded, stoned & paved. 
Land grading & backhoe service. 
Driveway stone delivered. Decorative 
stone Topsoil & sand. 908-521-2123 

HAROLD BROWN'S PAVING Specializing 
m residential & commercial driveways - 
both stone & asphalt; seal coating; park- 
ing tots. Serving the Princeton area since 
1949 Free estimates. Insured. 882-5817 

CENTRAL JERSEY PAVEMENT SEAL- 
ING CO. Sea! coating Rubberized tar 
crack filling. Residential & commercial. Ser- 
ving Princeton area over 14 yrs. 833-6526 

GRES PAVING Driveways - asphalt & 
stone; paving, sea) coating, parking lots; 
tennis courts; topsoil. Free estimates; fully 
insured; owner supervised. Serving 
Princeton area since 1952. .396-0984 

STANLEY PAVING Re-surfacing; pat- 
chwork; weather seal. Residential, com- 
mercial. Free estimates. Fully insured, 
special March & April discounl rates. 
386-9814 

• Pet Grooming: 

GROOMING BY GAYLE Dog & cat groom- 
inq "Not just good but great grooming!' 
By appointment 170 York Rd. Highlstown. 
426-0559 

• Pet Shops & Supplies: 

AGWAY-BELLE MEAD FARMERS CO-OP 

AN F ■ Big Red; IAMS. Punna; Science 
Diet & Biklac pet foods Bird Ipod-Hor^ 
& livestock (eed. Une Rd , off US .206. 

Belle Mead (201)359-5173 

• Pharmacies: 

FOREfl PHARMACY 

160 Witherspoon. Prn. 921-7287 



• Photographers: 

JAY PHOTOGRAPHY We solve 
photographic problems Portraits • Wed- 
dings • Bar/Bat Mitzvahs • Social & 
Business Events. Cranbury 448-5623 

• Photographic Services: 

PHOTO HAVEN OF MONTGOMERY One 

hour processing. Open 8-6 Mon-Fri, 9-5 
Sat. Montgomery Shop Ctr Rt. 206. north 
o' Rt 518 497 -1 200. 

• Piano Dealers: 

FREEHOLD MUSIC CENTER Pianos ft 
organs, warehouse prices. Rentals from 
S10 monthly Pond Rd Shop Mall Rt 9 
Freehold 201-462-4730. 

NOLDE'S PIANOS ft ORGANS, Inc. 
Hunlerdon Shop Ctr. Rte 202, Remington 
(30 min. from Prn.) 201-782-5400 

• Picture Framing: 

ALLENTOWN ART ft FRAME Custom 
Iraming; fine arts, prints & posters 
Needlework stretched & Iramed. Located 
in the Old Mill, Allentown. 259-3535 

THE MAGENTA GALLERY Custom Iram- 
ing • Consultations. Fine art lor home & of- 
fice. 131 Washington SI. (Rte. 518 across 
Irom P.O.) Rocky Hill 924-351 3 

• Pizzerias: 

ATHENIAN PIZZA ft RESTAURANT 

25 Witherspoon Si, Princeton.. 92 1-34 25* 
RODOLFO'S PIZZA All kinds ol pizza: Eat 

in - take oul. Sicilian, round pies, Calzone, 

Subs Open 7 days 11 am. to midnighl. 

Located in Montgomery Shopping Ctr. 

Rt. 206, 924-1813 
VESUVIO PIZZERIA ft RESTAURANT 

Pizza, calzone. zeppoli. subs. WE 

DELIVER, 258 Nassau. Prn. 921-2477. 

• Plumbing & Heating 
Contractors: 

M.J. GROVE PLUMBING ft HEATING 

Reprs. & alterations. Kitchen & balhroom 
remodeling. Lie No. 489, No 3274 ft No 
08442. * 55 N. Main, Windsor448-6083 

N.C. JEFFERSON PLUMBING ft 
HEATING Rsdtl. emmel, indstri Serving 
Ihe Prn, area Lie #7084. 924-3624 

OAVID G. LANNING INC. Plumbing ft 
Heating. Rsdtl & cmmrcl installations & 
repairs. Lie. *#4940. Local call from 
p ™ 466-0753 

ED MALEK PLUMBING ft HEATING 
Frozen pipes thawed & repaired, violations 
corrected. Balh & Kilchen remodeling 
water heaters. Oil & gas conversion. Free 
estimates. State Lie #5943. Please call 
448-3030 

REDDING'S PLUMBING ft HEATING 
Plumbing, htg. & air cond. License No 
5300 234 Nassau St. Prn. 924-0166 

• Plumbing & Heating Supplies: 

GORDONS WILSON CO. Full line of plum- 
bing ft heating supplies. Showroom at 135 
W Ward St, Highlsto wn 448-0507 

• Pool Tables: 

HOBSON'S BILUARD & Recreation Sply 

Sales & Service, 35 yrs. e xp.... 585-8898 

• Printers: 

AAA REPROGRAPHICS Offsel printing, 
camera slats. Fast service & competitive 
prices. 262 Alexander St. Prn. 924-8100. 

LDH PRINTING UNLIMITED 

Complete Printing Service. 924-4664. Off- 
set Printing — Fast Service — Color Prin- 
ting, Typesetting, Bond Copies, Rubber 
Stamps; Notary Service 1101 State Rd. 
(U.S. 206) Bldg. B, Prn. 

• Pumps & Well Drilling: 

SAMUEL STOTHOFF CO. INC. 

Rt. 31, Remington. 201-782-2116. 

• Real Estate: 

WM. H. FULPER, REALTORS 

Homes of Distinction. 
19 S. Mam, Yardley. Pa... 215-493-4007 
SCHLOTT REALTORS 
Princeton; 10 Nassau St. 921-1411 
Prn. Jctn. 50 Prn-Hlstn Rd. 799-8181 
Belle Mead: 840 Rt. 206 201-874-8421 

• Records & Compact Discs 
& Cassettes: 

PRINCETON RECORD EXCHANGE 

Bought & sold. New, Used, Oul of Print. 



Lunch • Dinner • Cocktails 
40 Mam St . Kingston 
(2 mi nonh of Prnctn.) 924-7400 
GREENSTREETS Lunch Mon thru Fn 

LURRY PEHON1S WATERFRONT Lurch sVLVMl SESv ,'„ ™ t. ™? I "" 

i£ SiST 3 e SoT^ S 03 R,Ve ' Rd " 516 »2tt. ROCK, H^iW S 

little szechuan restaurant • Tailoring: 3 

Luncheon_ Dinner Banquets. Take-Out THE PERFECT FIT Ladies cusiom made 9 

fig d l'^^L^^ "f S dc4h,ng;atteration s l W menftwomenPrn ? 

SIMPLY RAOISHING The Fresh Food Shop Clr Harrison St 683-0166 Z 

Alternative Featuring homemade soups, — •, 

quiche ft desserts. Fresh salads, sand- • Transmissions: 

iches 8. pastas Uwrerwe .Shop Ctr AAMCO TRANSMISSIONS 



Rt. 1 , Lawrenceville. 882-3760 



• Roofing Contractors: 



Free lowing & 22 point Iree multi check m 



701 Pnnceton Av, Trenton. 599-3990 
LEE MYLES Free Check II, Free Towing 
ALLIED ROOFING New iooIs - shingle ft 859 Rt 130, E. Windsor 448-0300 
slate. Roof repairs Gutters & leaders. Ful- — ' 

ly insured 448-5707 • Travel Agencies: 



AMERICAN EXPRESS TRAVEL 



BELLE MEAD ROOFING 

Serving Pnnceton & wcinrty tar 40 years "Don'tTeave Hom"e With'ouTus" 

All types ol roofing. Specializing in slate io Nassau Streel 

rools. Gutters, leaders, chimney (lashing & Pnnceton 921 8600 

Imi^IoS. 66 "" ' r0m Pfince,0n DELUXE TRAVEL BUREAU, INC. " 

t^Ui) Joy-aay^ Personalized Irauel «wrvi<-n 

COOPER ft SCHAFER INC. Est. .930 £?Jfi2a P-Son* 924-6270. 

M« a ^ V SP SS -SSf ' nSU,ed M GRAYCAR TRAVEL - Never a service 
fKbSq^,. cha, 9 e Ptansboro Prn.Meadows Shop. 

ECHO ROOFING Residential & commer- Qr. 609-799-7272, Hamilton Sq; 3672 Not- 

c.al Long warranty; j hvo years full ptus tmgham Way 609-587-7050! Hillsboro; 

20-30 years limited. Long standing Nelson's Corner. Rt 206. 201-281-6000; 

registration wilh the Consumer Bureau CORPORATE OFFICE. Toll free 1-800- 

t-ompetilive price. Call lor free 858-0852 



estimate 921-3721 



KULLER TRAVEL CO. 



RA. McCOHMACK COMPANY Serving Complete Iravel arrangements. 
Mercer County since 1970 All types ol 109 Nassau Streel, Princelon 924-2550. 
roofing; slate, cedai, asphalt shingles, rub- 



ber. Expert replacement or repairs. 1458 • Tree Service: 
River Rd, Titusville 737-6563 ACORN TREE * I sunqriiPF iwr 

MIRAGL1A ROOFING " ' '' 

Fiberglass shingles Seamless gutters. 



Attic ventilation. Modified Bitumen. 



Pruning, topping, removals, lot clearing, 
cabling, hedge trimming, wood chips. ' 



Residential & commercial Fully insured. 



unv«.g ua /^!m«« 'i-iul^ 2 ??^ Fr^matesTs"^™ s^ott Zapolski; 

MOVER'S ROOFING ft SHEET METAL P,op, Lawrenceville 682-6622 

New roofs, re-rools & repairs. Specializing ARMAND'S TREESCAPES Tree expert & 

in slate, cooper & tin roofs. Rubber roof professional landscapes Tree pruning ft " 

systems, shingle rools. All types ol gutters removal. Env. Science degree 20 yrs * ex- 

Ttffi'..? 8 - 8 ^?.^^!; 7729 perience Personalized service. Fully In- 

THERIAULT ROOFING sured . Reasonable rates. Armand 

All types of roof repairs • New roofs & gut- 452-041 1 

r! e £™£ »^ k J?. d .„ H . ^^l« 4 ^" 2645 EMPIRE ™EE * LANDSCAPE Pruning, 
D WOODS ROOFING ft SIDING Shmgle, tree & s, ump removal, cabling, leading & 
slale. rubber & hollar roofing. Vinyl siding s „ e clearing. Landscape services 
Residential & commercial. Fully insured Alt available Free estimates Reasonable 
work guaranteed. 538-0518 rates. 896-1640 

q.I, mU . i ni i M01 ,j n „». KIRCHNER TREE SERVICE All phases ol 

Schools; Independent: lfee work Pn}nirig> l0 ^ ng & ca J ing] Tree 

PRINCETON JUNIOR SCHOOL & stump removal. 890-6619 

• Upholstery: 

ANGELO RAIMO ft ASSOCIATES Expert 
upholstering, retinishing & caning. Large 
selection ol fabrics On sile touch up & 
repair. Limited on sile building restoration. 
Princeton area. 683-5525, 1 -800-525-574& 

ART FURNITURE ft DECORATING CO., 
INC. Est 1925. Upholslery. slipcovers, 
draperies, bedspreads, cornices, verticles 
& blinds We honor MC, Visa & Amex. Free 



2'/2 year old through 4th grade. P.O. Box 
224, Princeton 924-8126 & 921-2108 

• Septic Systems: 

BROWN, A.C. Sewer & drain cleaning. 
New -septic systems installed Cesspools 
cleaned & installed. Excavating. Tren- 
ching. "Don't Cuss, Call Gusl" 
Lawrenceville 882-7888 & 799-0260 

Sheds: 



R.A. MeCQRMACK COMPANY All types sh °P al nome se^'ce or Iree parking at 
of storage bldgs. Many standard styles. J^£,£j£ ,on Av > New Brunswick 90B. 
shapes & sizes or built lo your spec/fica- Jr.^ l„ ,,„.„, —__„ . M -™.— .,- 
lions Cedar, pine or T-t 1 1 Built bycrafts- ™ E *f[ UPHOLSTERY ft DECORATING 
men. Ask about our pool cabanas. 1458 CO. Upho slenng, draperies, slipcovers. 
River Rd. Titusvtlle 737-6563 Residential & commercial. Quality work. 

Large selection ol fabrics or cuslomers 

• Shoe Repair Shops: owfl m a'enal Free pick up & delivery . Ser- 

._ „ ;__,,__ „ , ving the Princeton area loi 10 yrs. 201- 

JOHN'S SHOE SHOP. Expert repairs of 247.9345 
shoes incl orthopedic & athletic shoes. '" 
Tulane, Prn. 924-5596. 



THE FURNITURE RESTORATION CEN- 
TER fleupholstering since 1948. Furniture 
relinishing Antique restoration. Caning. ' 
Rushing Custom draperies & upholstered 
cornices Large selection of designer 
fabrics. 859 Rle. 130, E. Windsor. 



• Rentals: 

FRIENDLY RENTAL CENTERS 

Thousands of rental rtemsll Fast delivery 
Princelon 452-9166. Kendall Pk: 
3600 Rt. 27 201-297-6100 . 

• Restaurants: 

ANDY'S TAVERN ft RESTAURANT 

Family lavern serving lunch & dinner 
244 Alexander St., Princeton 924-5666 

THE ANNEX HESTAURANT Italian 
American cuisine. Serving Pnnceton com- 
munity since 1950. 128V* Nassau St. 
Princeton 921-7555 

ATHENIAN PIZZA ft RESTAURANT 
Lunch, Otnner, Pizza. Open 7 days 25 
Witherspoon St, Princeton 921-3425 

BUFFALO'S SPRING STREET CAFE 
Home of the famous Buffalo Wings and 
Salads. We deliver. 
16 Spring St. Princelon. Call 921-0027 

CHARLEY'S BROTHER 
Lunch ■ Dinner • Cocktails 
Route 654. Hopewell (off Rt 31) 466-01 10. 

CHINA MOON In the Quaker Bridge Mall. 
Szechuan. Hunan, Mandarin. Open 7 
days R1 1, Lawrenceville 799-6799 

CLANCY'S PLACE - Great lood 1 Lunch & 
dinner daily specials, fresh ftsh daily Open 
Mon thru SaL Prn. Shop. Ctr.. Hamson St 
921-8646 

CRANBURY INN, THE Fine Dining - 
Lunch. Dinner, Sunday Bruncri. Cocktails. 
21 So' Mam. Cranbury 655-5595 

DIAMOND'S Award winning Restaurant in 
the heart of Chambersburg. voted "Best 
of the Best" ft "Best ol trie Burg". Dinner 
served 'til midnite 7 nites a wk; Lunch Mon. 
thru Fn. 132 Kent St.. Tren 393-1000 
Continued in Next Column 



• Shoes: 

FASH-N-FIT SHOES, INC. Women's & 
Men's Complete range of sizes AAAA- 
EEEE Elegani fashions. Incomparable 443-1774 
comfort. Complete ORTHOPEDIC CHARLES J. SKILLMAN CO. - Est. over 
footwear facility. Concordia Shop. Clr, 75yrs Qualrtyuphofstering.largeselection 

Cranbury 655-8073 ol fabrics 38 Spring, Princeton 924-0221 

THE UPHOLSTERY SHOPPE Tremen- 

• Siding Contractors: dous fabric selection or customer's own 
LARRY THE SIDING MAN. - Custom malerial. Specializing in anliques Residen- 

siding ft windows Quality work at fair ,ial & commercial work. Free estimates, 

prices Financing available. Toll free F '^ P I( *- U P & deliveiy 285 S Mam St - 

1 -800-662-0069 & 609-87 1 -6800 Rle. 29, Lambertville 397-3712 

LAWRENCEVILLE HOME IMPROVE- - ii„i.„|„»„, u o. n M „.,;«.. 

ment ctr. vmyi sidmg & windows , ance • Upholstery & Draperies. 

1952 Free est 609-882-6709 CREATIVE DRAPERIES* ED'S UPHOL- 

SIDING BY GRACE STERY Upholstery & draperies. Master 

Siaing Roofing. Replacement windows craftsmen. Large selection ol fabrics or 
Home Improvements. Additions. shop-at-home service 598 Livingston Av, 

Sole proprietor. Robert E Rinderer. North Brunswick 908-937-6742 

Fully Insured Free estimates 259-7036 '""~ 7. ~ 

stateline co. Experts in vinyi siding, • Waterproofing Contractors: 

roofing, replacement windows, slale repair, ASSOCIATED DESERT-DRY WATER- 

gutters & leaders. Aluminum soffit & fascia PROOFING CONTRACTORS, INC. 2nd 
trim Masonry work Sidewalks & Generation serving Princeton area smce 

chimneys 683-0007 iggg (609) 393-3033 

^ _ . STA DRY BASEMENT WATERPROOF- 

• *>0d: ING CO. Free estimates Lifetime 
CLARKSVILLE SOD FARMS, INC. guarantee FHA Certifica lions, References 

We grow quality Kenlucky blue grass given. Fully insured 609-392-6700 

blends. 4240 Quakerbridge Rd, Princeton. VULCAN Basement waterproofing. Proven 
896-0336 Professional methods to solve any water 
■ problem. Free estimates ., (609)393-5577 

• Spas; Hot Tubs: ^ IM . , — ; 

national spas a hot tubs Corner • Window Cleaning: 

Rt 206&514, Belle Mead 201-874-6666 MACK'S WINDOW CLEANING Windows 
' cleaned inside ft oul including storm win- 

• Stationery; Cards: dows $6 OO per window Fully insured All 
CENTER STATIONERS Princelon work guaranteed. Serving the Pnnceton 

Clhnnninn CU H Harnwin *?t 9?4-5706 afea ,0f ^ v,s J9J-^l^i 

— PRINCETON BUILDING MAINTENANCE 

Residential - Commercial - Store Fronts. 
10% discount if you mention this ad. 
520-0888 



• Stone, Natural: 

TRENTON STONE & MARBLE CO. 

Marble, slate, granite, limestone, etc. 
Wilburtha Rd , W Trenton 882-2449. 



• Surgical Supplies: 

AMBEST 

1674 Pennington Rd Ewing S82-3702 
FORER PHARMACY 

160 Witherspoon, 



• Windows: 



LAHHY THE SIDING MAN. Custom Siding 
& windows Quality work al fair ptices. 
Financing available. Toll free 
1-800-662-0089 & 609-871-6800. 
.„ ,„ 07 . LAWRENCEVILLE HOME IMPROVE- 
y^-'* ' MENT CTH. Vinyl siding & windows since 

1952. Free est 609-882-6709 

R.A. McCORMACK COMPANY Replacing 
and/or installing windows in Mercer County 



• Swimming Pool Services: 

GEORGIANNA'S POOL VACUUMING 

SERVICE Weekly. Bi-Weekly. Inilial since 1970. All lypes of wood or solid vinyl 



Vacuums, Vacation Service. Reasonable windows. Double hung, casement, sliders. 

rates. 259-7754 bows. bays, picture windows All major 

brands; Andersen. Pelta. Marvin, etc. 1458 
River Road. Titusville. 737-6563 



• Swimming Pools & Supplies: 

BARNETT-HENORICKS POOLS, INC. 

Princeton's leading pool builder • Window Treatments: 

Over 30 Y£ experience 609-452-8896 TRENT0N H0ME FABRICS Invites you to 
CHURCH POOLS One piece seamless ^j, ^0^0^ (of unusual custom window 
fiberglas pools. No concrete to crack. No tre atmenls ft designer labncs at discount 
vinyl to rip, tear or feplace No pflCes . 166 1 N. Olden Av, Ewing Town- 
maintenance. 195 Sharon Rd. Hob- ^ 771.928O 

binswlle Free estmales 987-1050 W | N DOW ACCENTS Custom window 

NATIONAL POOLS corner Rt. 206 ft 514. , fealmerls Brand names a , dlscoun , 

Belle Mead 201-874-6666 ^ 5^^ P ' ton a rea609-2 75-2 902. 

Continued In Next Column — 



T School Cuts 

*- Continued from Page 1 

5 staff is certified from K 
- through 12. Mr. Loughran, 
•- since he was hired recently, has 
si fewer tenure rights than more 
5 senior teachers. 
< Board members Ann Mc- 
> Goldrick and Corinne Kyle, 
o stating that they felt music was 
2 taking a pretty heavy hit, ask- 
g ed for a revue of the music cuts 
in prior to the April 16 budget 
* adoption. 



z The reduction in basic skills 
z " teachers at the elementary 
O schools, along with an increase 
uj in aides, came in for criticism 
z from one parent. "I am unhap- 
S.py about the new delivery sys- 
* tern of basic skills," she said. 
8 "I saw this in another district. 
K Teachers become the adminis- 
£ tratorsof para professionals." 
2 She also said she would have 
£ liked to see more cuts in the 
£ Valley Road administrative 
budget, asked why the person- 
nel office has three secretaries, 
said the fifth grade was hardest 
hit, and said she was unhappy 
with the changes in the child 
study team. 
Zero-Based Budgeting 
There were several calls 
from members of the audience 
for zero-based budgeting for 
the schools. One man said that 
there has been an increase 
since 1984 of ten percent in the 
number of students but a doubl- 
ing in the budget. He asked that 
the budget be brought to base 
and costs then developed. 
Board members responded 
by noting that $800,000 was 
spent last year in asbestos 
abatement alone, and that 
there are many more man- 
dated programs than there 
were ten years ago. 

"My son spends two hours 
and 20 minutes on four core 
subjects each day in middle 
school," said one parent. 
Noting that teachers are re- 
iuired to have 4^ hours of pu- 
ff contact per day &k* sug- 
gested there could be a 
substantial saving in not using 
experienced teachers in such 
areas as home room, recess, 
and study hall. 

Middle School Principal 
William Johnson said he did not 
want to respond publicly to this 
comment, but did say he believ- 
ed the comments were not ac- 
curate. 



No Administrators' Contract Yet 

Contract negotiations are continuing between the Regional 
School Board and the Princeton Regional Administrators' As- 
sociation. The Board's Business and Finance Committee 
chair, Corinne Kyle, said she remains hopeful that an agree- 
ment can be reached prior to the April 30 School Board elec- 
tion. 

The 1991-92 salary for School Superintendent Carol Choye 
must also be negotiated, a process that usually begins after 
an agreement has been reached with the administrators. Dr. 
Choye's current salary is $97,794. 

Although her salary is negotiated each year, the terms of 
the 1989-92 employment agreement between the Board and 
Dr. Choye remain the same. 

Under this agreement, Dr. Choye receives a car for busi- 
ness and personal use, as well as an amount not to exceed 
$500 for her personal income tax assessment resulting from 
this benefit. 

In addition, the employment agreement provides a tax shel- 
ter that started at $3,000 per year in 1987 and increases each 
year until 1996, when there will be a total of $50,000 plus in- 
terest in the account. At that time, the benefit will end. 

School Board Candidate Debbie Curtis has questioned the 
provision of a car to Dr. Choye. "We are cutting lower sala- 
ries and positions," she said. "I think that if someone earns 
$100,000 a year, they can afford a car." 

Ms. Kyle recently polled other districts and found that 
Lawrence, with an enrollment of 2,916, pays its superintend- 
ent $102,345 and provides a car. There is no tax shelter, but 
a sabbatical is available after seven years' service. 

In West Windsor, with an enrollment of 5,100 — about twice 
that of Princeton's 2,500 students — the superintendent is paid 
$98,650 but receives no car or other major benefits outside 
the standard health and pension benefits received by all ad- 
ministrators. 

Montgomery, with 1,500 students, pays its superintendent 
$88,000 and provides no car. A tax shelter to equal about $6,000 
is provided. 

Outside New Jersey, in districts that are considered com- 
petitive with Princeton, the superintendent of schools in 
Scarsdale, N.Y., (3,708students) is paid $135,000and receives 
a car. In Wilton, Conn., (2,700 students) the superintendent's 
salary is $1 12,500. There is no car provided, but there is a car 
allowance, as well as a $7,500 tax shelter and a sabbatical. 
The size of the staff at the Valley Road administrative 
building has also been questioned during recent budget hear- 
ings. According to a Board memorandum dated March 28, 
there is a total of 26 staff members at Valley Road, including 
secretaries, clerks, and bookkeepers. Of these, 2'i positions 
are expected to be eliminated from the new budget. 

Current salaries at Valley Road include $86,633 for the as- 
sistant superintendent for business, $82,776 for the supervis- 
ing principal, $72,995 for the director of student services, 
$72,995 for the director of personnel, $69,116 for the manag- 
er of faculties, and rs6,537 for the comptroller. 

"In my years on the Board, I have seen the staff at Valley 
Road more and more compressed until it is the minimum 
number of people required to do the work that needs to be 
done," said Ms. Kyle. "I have heard from members of the 
community that we are overstaffed. This reflects the time 
we were overstaffed, when I came on the Board. Year after 
year, we have been culling positions and reorganizing work 
so that it could be done more efficiently by people at lower 
salaries." 





established 1939 

ierson's 

Nursery 

Landscaping • Garden Center ' Waterscaping 

• Weekend Special • 
all outdoor trees, 

evergreens & 
flowering shrubs 
April 19, 20, 21 



25% 
OFF 



le nom OFFERS FULL SERVICE 
CUSTOM MONOGRAM EMBROIDERY, 
LETTERING, DESIGNS, AND LOGOS 

1 08 main street 

princeton forrestal village 

(609) 520-1445 




Holly Tone 
25 lbs $5" 



Scott's Four Step 

$48°° 



609-924-5770 

Hours: Daily 9-6; Sun 10-5 
3730 Lawrenceville Road (Route 206) 

(Between Lawrenceviile & Princeton) 



Spring 



ALL WOLMANIZED LUMBER 10% OFF. 
FHEE PLAN BOOKS TO BUILD TRELLISES, ARBOYS, 
DECKING, GARDEN SHEDS, FENCES AND EDGINGS 



company has not received word 

Asking why the extra pay for from the bank that it wiii not be something old or new to sell? Try a 

extra service (e.p.e.s.) budget managing the company. "We T0WN TOPICS classified ad. Call 

item was up, and not down, Dr. could enter into a mangement 924 2200 

Cooper said he would have cut contract," she said, 

this item — which is close to a Borough Mayor Marvin Reed 

half million dollars — a lot said he was relieved at the 

more, making deeper cuts to move because he had been 

save positions. The e.p.e.s. hearing rumors that it was 

item is for stipends paid to pending. "This created uncer- 

teachers for work outside their tainties in the economic situa- 

teaching assignments, such as Hon relating to the completion 

athletics and clubs. of the square. Henderson can 

Board members were ex- proceed with its marketing 

pected to ask a number of ques- pian for the 17 condominiums, 

tions about the budget at the and if the additional units 

April 16 meeting. A great many aren't built, there can be' a 

parents and taxpayers were clean-up plan to make the back 

also expected to be present, of the garage partially decent." 

>rinceton residents will be able Thorn In Borough S Side 
The back of the Hulf ish North 



r 



■ 



10% OFF 

ALL 
SCREEN 
DOORS 

WOOD OR 

ALUMINUM 

INSTALLATION AVAILABLE 



ir 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 
ii 

LlL 



10% OFF 

ALL SAKRETE 
PRODUCTS 

BLACKTOP MIX, 

SEALER 

CONCRETE AND 

SAND MIX 




All coupons valid April 16-30, 1991. Limit one per customer. Coupons must be presented® 
194 Alexander Street, Princeton 



^5' ■■ 



924-0041 

Lumber Cut to Your Order 

Personalized Service and Delivery 



VISA 



to vote on the budget in the 
April 30 School Board election. 



Myrna K. Bearse I"* 8 !' °" PaU ' Robes .!. 
Place, has been a thorn in the 



Collins 



Borough's side. The planned 
location of the additional 97 
housing units, it has remained 
a construction site since the in- 



Conlimred from Page 1 

it looks as though the Bank of itial 17 units were completed. 
New York does not intend to There are construction 
change management of Palm- materials throughout the site, 
er Square, but simply to exert and poor drainage creates huge 
, authority as banker to control pools after a rain, 
the financial decisions of the The Mayor said he hoped that 
company. the Hulfish Street Plaza and the 
Mr. Berner said he would like proposed restaurant adjoining 
to see the three sections — it could now go forward. "When 
Hulfish North, the Nassau Inn I can determine who is actual- 
Limited Partnership, and ly in charge, we can discuss 
Palmer Square Limited Part- cleanup of the plaza and a more 
nership — continue to operate creative marketing of the park- 
as one, but he is not clear about ing garage," he said, 
the bank's plans. He said that Collins Development is also 
leasing efforts have been held facing a second foreclosure by 
in abeyance and that inquiries the Bank of New York for fail- 
are being transmitted to the ing to repay a J2.6 million loan 
Bank of New York. used to buy land next to the 

Princeton Junction train sta- 

Jessica Blais, a spokes- tion. 

woman for Collins, said that the —Myrna K. Bearse 



The U-Store Offers the Best in European History: 




JavisktouhinNim Europe 

Debcmli Dworh 



■ Free Parking in our own lot 
• Open your own U-Store account 
and charge instantly, or use 
VISA, MasterCard or AmEx 



Dpi 

1 Over 100,000 titles in stock \5 

• FasL Efficient Special Order Service 

■ Outstanding selection of Journals 
and periodicals 



Children With A Star: Jewish 
Youth in Nazi Europe. Deborah 
Dwork. Yale University Press, $25.00. 

This powerful and moving book tells for the first time the 
history of the children who lived and died in the shadow of 
the Holocaust. Drawing on oral histories, archival records 
and an extraordinary range of letters, diaries, and family 
albums. Deborah Dwork reveals the feelings, daily activities 
and perceptions of Jewish children in Nazi Europe in their 
homes, in hiding. i„ ghettoes. and in the death camps 

By focusing on the shattering experiences and daily routines 
of chddren during the period of Nazi domination in Europe 
Dwork s e j in il|uminatjng a prevjous|y une ed 

tZ 7 ?H? ^ 0ry - 0nly ' en PeTOnt of Jew *" children 
survwed the Nazi onslaught. Dwork's powerful book gives 
new meaning to this numbing statistic." 

— Library Journal 



Open Mon.-Sat. 9:00-5:30; Thurs. 'til 8:30 




t&te 



36 University Place 
609-921-8500 




Trash Troop Campaign 

The spring Trash Troop Campaign in which more than 140 
volunteers get out and pick up litter on streets, roads and open 
spaces starts this Saturday, coordinating with the many 
Earth Dayjctivities and the clean-up of county waterways 
and parks by 150 girl scouts. 

Trash Troop displays will be at the Whole Earth celebra- 
tion at Turning Basin Park on Sunday, starting at noon, and 
at Commumversity Day, April 27. Anyone interested in adopt- 
ing an area to patrol may sign up on the Trash Troop town 
map on either day or call Trash Troop coordinator, Anne 
Adriance, at 924-3545. A copy of the map will hang in both 
Borough and Township halls. 

Anti-Iittering posters by school children will again be 
displayed in stores during the two-week clean-up, and the 
bright yellow T-shirts with the Trash Troop recycling logo 
are avaUable. Volunteers are urged to wear their shirts as 
often as possible during the campaign. The Trash Troop goal 
is to encourage no littering from cars or from pedestrians, 
and allow all of us to enjoy and appreciate our beautiful en- 
vironment. 



Lambert Awards 

Continued from Page 1 

community volunteers, al- 
though what they do and how 
they do it differs widely, just as 
they as individuals are very dif- 

v fcrent. Mrs. Farley, petite and 

> chic, is an experienced, profes- 
sional board member and 
board president, and a master 
at thinking up and running ma- 
jor fundraising events for the 
causes she believes in. 

Mr. Obert is a man of heft as 
yell as height, a solid, every- 
day fellow, plain and simple. 
He is a blue collar worker with 
increasing managerial respon- 
sibility whose activities as a 
line officer with the squad are 
also a mix of direct, 24-hour a 
day, hands-on emergency aid 
and administration. 

/ Mrs. Farley came to Prince- 

' ton in the early 1950s with her Boutique. Mrs. Farley was also skills so that you can do more, 

husband Edward, a Princeton one of the group of parents that The more you do, the more you 

University graduate. Born and founded Stuart Country Day can do." 

raised in New York City, she at- School and is a past president Volunteer!™ U AriHirti.,* 

fended Hunter College for a of Parents at Lawrenceville '" "* ? " f , „ „, "f 

year and worked at a broker- and the Friends of Princeton Mr 0bert agr . ees ful , ly - X oi ~ 

age firm and in an advertising Public Library unteering is extremely addic- 

agency doing public relations. - tlve and demanding," he says. 

In the late 1950s, after their She was on the founding com- " 1S 24 hours a A ^ tha ' m V 

two daughters and two sons mittee for the Festival of Trees, Phone or pager can go of , but 

were well along in school, Mrs. a benefit for the Blairstown \g et ^factum from helping 

Farley became involved in the Education Center. More other people. There are many 

•Association of the Neuro- recently she has become deep- tljt^ T T Tr 3 ~ 

psychiatric Institute in SkiU- ly involved with Eden Institute "™?' educatl0n . gratifica- 

man, which was looking for as a member of its board of vl' 

new ways to raise money. Hav- trustees and is currently board . \ ° j s , ays "? was sur ' 

ing run a house tour in New chairman. She served on the P nsed /n<> Pleased when he 

York for The Arthritis Associ- committee for the first Eden " ' 

ation, she suggested the Evening on the Town, co- 
Christmas in Princeton tour of sponsored with Lahiere's Res- 
houses decorated for Christmas taurant. 
. in early December. She was the In a different vein, Mrs. 
founding chairman of that Farley sang in the chorus of 
event, which has become a pre- three PG&B musicals, Ofeiaho 
Christmas tradition. ma, Carousel and Hello! Do! 

ly and helped run the Metropol- , ,• ,. , , 

A former Association board itan Opera auditions when they m( J dl ^„ ( ?"? n 'J ,e estimate ? h « 

•president, Mrs. Farley is stUl were held in this area. She was puts in 40 to 50 hours a week at 

on the Association board and on the founding committee of ™ e p ™ cet °n £"*' Aid and 

the steering committees for the June Opera Festival and Rescue Squad. He doesnt take 

Christmas in Princeton as well ran the party to celebrate its as ma " y . c f Us . as h . e f e< ? *> 7 

as the April Annual, the Asso- first opening night. f s ca ,P' am he B on duty ?? rtua '" 

ciation's other major fund- "I love bein| busy," Mrs. ly aU *e time responding to 

raiser. She also became involv- Farley says. "But I never take ^°™ w Z "!?"™„V W ° H 

ed with the Auxiliary ofPrince- on something I can't put my S^^dSZf teaching 

tfjn Medical Center and has energies into, or that I don't ""^intae teacning 

served as general chairman of believe in. What I do, I put my M nbefi'o father was a 



(EMS) Association to enable 
better coordination among 
squads. "Training will be a big 
part of coordination, as will 
combining resources and sup- 
plies," Mr. Obert says. "We 
plan to buy large amounts of 
supplies and have a central 
storehouse." 

Mr. Obert is also a single 
parent with a daughter now 
married and living in Hamilton 
with two little girls of her own, 
but he has shouldered the 
responsibility and care of two 
boys, the younger of whom is at 
John Witherspoon Middle 
School, for the past six years. 

Which bears out Mrs. 
Farley's dictum: "The more 
you do, the more you find you 
can do." 

— Barbara L. Johnson ' 



NEARLY NEW SHOP 

(Formerly the Outgrown Shop) 

Seasonal Dresses Galore 






O 



'.» I* ;• 



.. liNmriy 

i r 



New Sho; 



NASSAU STREET 



Upstairs behind 234 Nassau Street 
Mon.-Sat. 10-5 
924-5720 



\ 



learned he would receive this 
award. "It is extremely humbl- 
ing," he said. "The fact is, as 
everyone in the squad knows, 
no one person does it all. It's a 
team effort." 

In addition to his regular job 
as facilities supervisor at Com- 



tinues on the steering commit- 
tees of both. 

She ran the dinner dance at come' 
the Hyatt Regency to celebrate the type 



more than I have.' 
She says there is "psychic in- 



old but left the area in 1965 to 
try his luck in the south and in 



:" in volunteering. "This is ^TngTa^ After — 

£"??"..'■ "1*~ n 7 l r™!u rau: lne iype ? f " , ?,° me y ^ u d0 ? ' years away, he returned to take 
the Medical Center's 70th an- measure in dollars and cents. * jobwith (MonCampinLaw- 
niversary, and she continues on You get a great feeling when rpnrP yji|p 



the steering committees for the you accomplish something for 
June Fete and the Christmas someone else and it hones your 



N.C. JEFFERSON 

Plumbing & Heating, Inc. 

Commercial & Residential 
Serving the Princeton Area tor 44 Years 

Presents 

The $35.00 Service Call 

This price includes 30 minutes on the job 
and travel time to your home or business. 

We have found that most service calls are 
30 minutes or less. So to save our valued cus- 
tomers money we have restructured our ser- 
vice call charge. 

FOR PROMPT SERVICE CALL 

(609) 924-3624 



-LOOK FOR OUR YELLOW TRUCKS' 



Slate License # 7084 

609-924-3624 



VISIT OUR SHOWROOM FOR ALL 
YOUR REMODELING NEEDS AT 

JEFFERSON 
Bath and Kitchen 

198 Witherspoon Street 
Princeton, NJ 08542 

(609) 924-0762 

Serving Princeton. West Windsor, Plainsboro. 
Lawrenceville, Hopewell ond Montgomery 



renceville. 

His parents tried to steer him 
away from medical service, 
but when the opportunity pre- 
sented itself to take a first aid 
course at Union Camp, he 
decided it was something he 
should learn. While taking the 
course he thought he could do 
a good job teaching it at work 
and at his church, so he enroll- 
ed in the Red Cross first aid in- 
structor's course. 

The instructor suggested he 
join the Princeton First Aid and 
Rescue Squad, and he did. 
"During my entire first month, 
I never received a call because 
I didn't realize my radio was 
off," Mr. Obert recalls, with 
typical deprecating humor. 
"However, one year later I 
became a line officer, and I 
have served as an officer ever 
since." 

During his tenure, the squad 
has gone from "swoop and 
scoop" to advanced life sup- 
port. As captain in 1976, Mr. 
Obert was instrumental in 
bringing the Lifemobile pro- 
gram to Princeton. An anony- 
mous citizen donated $20,000 for 
the necessary equipment, 
enabling the Princeton squad to 
move up in priority for this pro- 
gram. Other squads at a 
greater distance from a medi- 
cal center had been ahead of 
Princeton on the list. 

Mr. Obert took a year off 
work to become certified as a 
paramedic at the College of 
Medicine and Dentistry in New- 
ark. In April, 1990, he and the 
other County captains 
established the Mercer County 
Emergency Medical Services 




,Ae* 



***?*<*» ****** 
^ JOS* 1 * 




Che lsea 
crimpers 



s»v>° 



Always Free Consultations 

For your appointment and 
consultation, call 924-1824 

Distinctive personal service in a friendly atmosphere 



14 SPRING STREET 
PRINCETON, NJ. 

(609)924-1824 



TUE C THUnS 0-6. tt/fO O Fftl <?-€>> 5AT V-A-00 

OPEN LATE TUES O THURS TIL 8 




ANXIETY 

ff,< ^ mFORMArmn 

OVHBLOA0 



Whatever you call it, it's a very real part of life. 

For most of us, there are simply too many facts 
to keep up with. No one can be expected to 
know all the answers. 

Ask us. . .the librarians at the 
Princeton Public Library. 

We're here to help you track down 
the information you need. 

We're your information specialists. 



65 WITHERSPOON STREET • 924-9529 



■,-.iliA .>i HfllfU — 



9ril Jerii biez ,anilIoD-*iot nemow 







— — 



PEOPLE 

In the News 



Polly DiGiovacchino, of 

J Pennington, well known 
jj throughout the Mercer County 
" banking community, has 
a retired after 30 years of ser- 
jjvice. Working most recently 
. out of Chemical Bank New Jer- 
i sey's (CBNJ) Forrestal Center 
* ofice, Ms. DiGiovacchino com- 
| pleted a varied ba nking career 

- as vice president of residential 
j mortgage sales. 

I She joined Princeton Bank, a 
£ CBNJ predecessor, in 1961 as a 
„- management trainee. Subse- 
J quently assigned to Princeton 
^ Bank's Hopewell and Nassau 

- Street offices, she was later 
| named supervisor of the bank's 
§ bookkeeping and transit area. 

- After holding various posi- 
tions in accounting and pur- 
chasing, and as special assist- 
ant to the president, Ms 




Marine Pvt. Michael D. 
Marano, 14 Stanford Place, 
Princeton Junction, has com- 
pleted recruit training at 
Marine Corps Recruit Depot, 
Parris Island, S.C. 

He is a 1990 graduate of West w 
Windsor-Plainsboro High =f 
School. 

Phyllis Marchand, Town- 
ship Committeewoman, has 
been elected first vice- 
president of the New Jersey As- 
sociation of Elected Women Of- 
ficials. At the annual 
reorganization meeting held at 
Rutgers University, she moder- 
ated a panel discussion on the 
role and activities of women's 
organization. 

Ms. Marchand, a graduate of 
Skidmore College, is currently 
serving her second term on 
Township Committee. She also 
serves as third vice-president 
of the board of the New Jersey 
League of Municipalities. 



Thompson Land 



195 Nnuu Street 
Princeton, N.J. 
(609)921-7655 



ERNEY'S 

Unfinished Furniture 

1000 PIMM of Wood Furniture! 

2807 Rt. 1 Builneu 
Lawrence • 530-0097 



RETIRING FROM BANKING CAREER: Polly DiGiovac- 
DiGiovacchino became Prince- cn|n0 gnown w | th Ar j 8t |des W. Georgantas, presi 

tnn Ran tr c mnr at a a Irian nth. - _* - - ... . ** . "... 



ton Bank's mortgage loan offi 
cer. 

A native of Leavenworth, 
Kan., Ms. DiGiovacchino 
began her banking career at 



dent and CEO, Chemical Bank New Jersey, is retiring 
after 30 years of service with the bank. 



of Pennington. 

She has served as president 
of the National Association of 



processing and advanced ing countries. Since 1965, IESC 
. signal processing research, has completed more than 13,000 
^ e D°™! r rt fJ! Nat,onal Bank simulation and visualization re- projects in 95 countries. 

search, and computational For information on serving 
science research activities. as an executive volunteer, 
A native of Newark, he re- write W.J. Lippincott, vice- 
Bank Women, the Mercer ceived B s M s and ph D president reC ruiting, IESC, 
S £ B ( anker . s Association, degrees, all in mathematics, P.O. Box 10005, Stamford, 
trie ITenton chapter ■ oi tne f rom the University of Chicago, Conn. 06904-2005, (203) 967-6000. 
American Institute of Banking where he was a Nati0I f aJ _L_ 

nftfZTr? Interiiab0I,al Science Foundation fellow. He Representatives of New Jer- 

J also did postdoctoral research / ig community colleges 

at the Institute for Advanced h ' p](tr t P( i Hnnewell Town- 

r^ZfJZtT,,^ ^ ET! ™ ( '° '^.IT shTp^ta nl DoKd J Loff 
recognized at the the Umver- was a visiting professor at the {V chairman of the Coun- 
sity of Michigan's annual State University of New York ™ ™ F™'* 1"™,°'* He™ 

Honors Convocation at the Ann at Albany. J" „?' "™, y „°'2^' ri 

. . „ r, «i,- , ■ . j .,«. Senior vice president — In- 

-SL T£ Minh.n. , ^ f^lT ,?" vestments for PaineWebber, 
They are, Michelle Laboratories at the David Sar- 

Pressma, 40 Dogwood Lane ; noff Research Center in 1976 as 

Michael S. Spiro, 518 Ewing a member of the Technical 

Street, Rachel M. Weiss, 301 Staff. 



Robert A. Murray, Rolling 
Hill Road, Skillman, president 
of RCP Management Com- 
pany, has been honored as Cer- 
tified Property Manager of the 
Year by New Jersey Chapter 
No. 1 of the Institute of Real 
Estate Management. 

The award is in recognition of 
his contribution to the advance- 
ment of real estate manage- 
ment as a profession. 



I 



i Wlndow Accents 

I C'islotn Windm Treatments 

609-275-2902 

Name Brands 31 a Discount 

Fully Guaranteed 

Residential ' Commercial 

Free Estimates 



Lunch-Dinner 

Cocktails 
Sunday Branch 

ROCKY HILL 

INN 

137 Washington St. 
Rocky Hill, N.J. 

921-8421 



State Road; Arthur G. Kraft, 
378 Village Road East, Dina J. 

tesncfr, 35 Windsor £>rive, 

both Princeton Junction; and 
Beth S. Kleber, II Dunbar 
Drive, West Windsor. 

Six area residents are among 
approximately 1,250 winners of 
corporate-sponsored National 
Merit Scholarships. 

They are, Alexander Cava- 
naugh, 204 Ewing Street,; 
Breon L. Wood, 6 Gulick 
Road, both students at Prince- 
ton High School; Anita R. 
Bhandiwad, 14 Groendyke 
Lane, Plainsboro, Simona M. 
Dumitrescu, 255 Varsity Av- 
enue, both students at West 
Windsor-Plainsboro High 
School; Alfred R. Dolich, 13 
Blue Spruce Drive, Pennington, 
a student at Hopewell Valley 




Jean Martin 



Inc., Princeton. 

Mr. Loff is a member and 
former vice-chairman of the 
Council of County Colleges' 
Legislative Committee. He 
served on the Board of Higher 
Education's Constituents' Ad- 
visory Committee to the 
Chancellor Search, and now 
serves on the Council's Funding 
Formula Task Force. 

Elisabeth L. Reichard, 

daughter of Harry and Donna 
Reichard, 661 Prospect Ave- 
nue, has been initiated into 
the International Legal Fra- 
ternity, Phi Delta Phi. The 
honor fraternity was establish- 
ed in 1880 to promote ethics and 
high standards in the legal pro- 
fession. 

Ms. Reichard is a legal intern 
at the Commodity Futures 
Trading Commission in Wash- 




Princeton's lull 

service 

wine & liquor store 

CAU. FOR FREE DELIVERY 

^Community 

lUouOK 

23 Witherspoon St 
Princeton • 924-0750 

| M 9:30-9; Tu-Sal 9:30-9:30; 
Sun 12-5 



ARTWORKS 

The Visuol Arts Schooi 
of Princeton and Trentor 



Classes Lectures 
Trips Exhibits 

609-921-9173 

formerly Princeton Art Association 

a little bit of 



V 




Wriat you Faray) 



h 

20 Nossau Street 
Princeton 
924-1270 




OFFICE EQUIPMENT 



USED 
OFFICE FURNITURE 

CLEARANCE 



ington and attends law school 

Jean Martin of Princeton at George Mason University in 

Central High School; and nas i oined Peyton Associates Arlington, Va. She will receive 

Douglas J. Sabo, 64 Pine Realtors 'P ri nceton office. She the Juris Doctor degree in May. 

Knoll Drive, Lawrenceville, a nas n years of area real estate She is a graduate of Princeton 

student at Lawrence High ex P erience . which includes Day School and Cornell Univer- 

School sales as well as office and sales sity. 

management. 

Ms. Martin holds a B. A. from 
., _. „,. , Westmont College in Santa 

m™™"^ ^ ,na ^ ky ' m Barbara ' Calif - a « d a niter's 
Sh J r i ha , s f been a P" degree from Queens University 
pointed director. Information in Ontario, Canada 



Sciences Laboratory, at the 
David Sarnoff Research Cen- 
ter. 

Dr. Winarsky's responsi- 
bilities include direction and 
supervision of advanced image 




Norman D. Winarsky 



Abraham and Esther 
Seldner, 188 Grover Avenue, 
have returned from Casablan- 
ca, Morocco, where Mr. Seld- 
ner served as a volunteer with 
the International Executive 
Service Corps (IESC). 

Mr. Seldner, a retired chem- 
ist and former vice president of 
technical services, Amerchol 
Corp., a division of CPC Inter- 
national, was recruited by 
IESC to assist Azbane, a 
manufacturer of cosmetics and 
perfumes, with improving the 
quality of its cosmetics, per- 
fumes and hotel toiletries. This 
was his second project for the 
International Executive Ser- 
vice Corps. 

IESC is a not-for-profit 
organization of American 
businessmen and women 
devoted to providing manager- 
ial and technical assistance to 
private enterprises in develop- 



William Burks, son of Dr. 
and Mrs. William P. Burks, 
1330 The Great Road, a senior 
at Lake Forest College, Illinois, 
is a starting doubles player on 
the school's tennis team. Mr. 
Burks is a graduate of Avon Old 
Farms, Avon, Conn. 




Richard V. Sinding 



Maryann B. Coffey 

Dr. Maryann Bishop Cof- 
fey, associate provost, Prince- 
ton University, was elected a 
national co-chair of the Na- 
tional Conference of Christians 
and Jews at its annual board of 
trustees meeting. 

Dr. Coffey becomes the first 
woman and the first African 
American to be elected a na- 
tional co-chair in the 64-year 
history of the human relations 
organization, which has offices 
in 70 cities. 

Dr. Coffey, who served on the 
Pittsburgh board of NCCJ, 
earned a Ph.D. in psychology 
from the University of Pitts- 
burgh, where she served in 
many departments and capaci- 
ties. She served as a member 
of the Pittsburgh Board of 
Public Education where she 
designed and conducted work- 
shops on affirmative action; 
she has also been an education- 
al media consultant; assistant 
director and staff psychologist 
for the educational-medical 
program of the Urban League 
of Pittsburgh, one of the first 
programs in the nation design- 
ed to retrain pregnant teen- 
agers in high school, and pro- 
gram director of the YMCA. 

Richard V. Sinding, 798 

Princeton-Kingston Road, was 
named director of policy and 
planning in the Governor's Of- 
fice of Management and Plan- 
ning. He hads been a policy ad- 
visor to the Governor for the 
past year, specializing in 
criminal and juvenile justice, 
corrections, and energy policy! 
Mr. Sinding, a 1967 graduate 
of Rutgers University, was for- 
merly president of the Center of 
Analysis of Public Issues in 
Princeton, and editor of the 
center's monthly magazine, 
New Jersey Reporter. 



694 S. Broad St., Trenton 

921-1415;392-5166 

. visa - mastercharge j 



An hour 
for learning 
more 
of God 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE 

SUNDAY SERVICES 

10:30* a.m. & 4:30 p.m. 

( 'Suidoy School and (ttW axe ovotiobte) 

First Church of Christ Scientist 

16 Oayard Lone, Princeton | 



-- 




Lester & Robert Slatoff 

AUCTIONEERS 

ANTIQUE DEALERS - APPRAISERS 

| Furniture, China, Glass, Household, Silver & Jewelry 

Trenton, NJ 
1 609-393-4848 215-736-8989 



<J & P Roses are in! 

' Spring Vegetable Sets • 
* Come in for your 
Azaleas & Rhododendrons 




G 



OBAU 



We have ^. «j 

flowering trees & shrubs J -\, 

Fine Nursery Stock 
Lawn Seed & Fertilizer 
Open Mon-Sat 8-5; Closed Sunday 

CADI-icm 516 Alexander Rd. 
UAMUtlM Princeton, NJ 

4 — MARKET < At me Canal > 

$ ^* ■*»»*■ LANDSCAPE CONSULTANTS . 

5 "For the very best" 452-2401 



\ 



BUSINESS 



/ 



Six Partners Named 
By Lawrence Law Firm 

Cohen, Shapiro, Polisher, 
Shiekman and Cohen, Law- 
renceville, has announced that 
six attorneys have been named 
£S partners. The new firm 
members are Vincent E. Gen- 
tile, Michael H. Gluck, Kimon 
C. Hatza, Roxanne E. Jayne, 
Clifford Scott Meyer and Ivan 
J. Punchatz. 

Mr. Gentile, of Montgomery 
(Township, has become a mem- 
ber of the firm in its Environ- 
mental Department. He has 
been of counsel to the firm 
since 1989, and was previously 
chief of the Civil Division of the 
Office of the United States At- 
torney for the District of New 
Jersey. 



Mr. Gluck, of Princeton, has 
become a partner of the firm in 
its Corporate and Government- 
al Affairs Department. His 
practice concentrates in the 
areas of municipal finance, 
'health care and governmental 
affairs. Before joining the law 
firm in 1988, he served as as- 
sistant counsel and appoint- 
ments counsel to former New 
^ Jersey Governor Thomas 
\Kean. 
. Mr. Hatza, of Merion, Pa., a 
member of the firm in its Cor- 
porate Department, has been 
associated with Cohen, Shapiro 
in its Philadelphia, Pa. office 
since 1984. Mr. Hatza 's practice 
is concentrated in corporate 
law and finance, with special 
" emphasis in the areas of ac- 
quisitions and sales of private- 
. ly held companies and bank 
financings. 

Ms. Jayne, of Trenton, has 
become a partner in the Envi- 
ronmental Department. For 
several years prior to becom- 
ing of counsel to Cohen, Shapiro 
in 1989, she served as chief en- 
vironmental counsel to Her- 
cules Incorporated, a major 
diversified chemical company 
headquartered in Wilmington, 
i)e\. 

Mr. Meyer, of Philadelphia, 
has become a member of the 
firm in its Estates and Trusts 
^ Department resident in the 
N Philadelphia office. He has a 
practice concentration in the. 
areas of estate planning, pro- 
bate and trust law. 

Mr. Punchatz, who is now a 
partner of the firm in the 
Health Care Department, 
became of counsel with Cohen, 
Shapiro in 1989. Before joining 
the firm, he was a deputy at- 
torney general of New Jersey 
and served as chief counsel to 
the Department of Human Ser- 
vices and its Medicaid pro- 
gram, psychiatric hospitals 
and developmental centers. 



Personnel Notes 

Charles Young, of Law- 
renceville, has rejoined 
Gillespie Advertising, Inc. as 




RELIGION 




Charles Young 



Thom Everitt 



account manager. He was pre- 
viously director of marketing 
for the New Jersey Nets. 

A graduate of Emory Univer- 
sity, Mr. Young received a 
bachelor of arts degree in 
political science. 

Commodities Corporation, 
Princeton, has announced six 
new promotions. 

They are, Thomas F. Dailey, 
of Princeton, to senior vice 
president; Jacob Rosengarten, 
of West Windsor, to first vice 
president; Bruce Bills, of Cran- 
bury, to vice president; Mary 
Kellington, of Jackson, to as- 
sistant vice president; Kathy 
Hill, of Princeton Junction, to 
associate; and Bruce Yama- 
moto, of Trenton, to associate. 

Thorn Everitt, of Law- 
renceville, a sales associate in 
the Princeton office of Fox & 
Lazo Realtors, Jack Burke 
Real Estate, has been awarded 
two top sales awards for 1990, 
the President's Club and NJAR 
Million Dollar recognition. He 
produced more than $5 million 
in sales and listings during the 
year. 

Jerry Rosen has been nam- 
ed community relations repre- 
sentative for Princeton House, 
the psychiatric and addictions 
services unit of Princeton Med- 
ical Center. 

Mr. Rosen will join Carl 
Amenhauser, the other com- 
munity relations represen- 
tative, in maintaining and ex- 
panding relationships with the 
community, referring physi- 
cians, and organizations. 

A graduate of the City Col- 
lege of New York and a resi- 
dent of Milford, Mr. Rosen was 
formerly director of communi- 
ty relations, marketing and de- 
velopment for Mercy Hospital 
in RockvUle Centre, NY. Prior 
to his position at Mercy Hospi- 
tal, he was director of public in- 
formation for the New Jersey 
Division of the American Can- 
cer Society. 

At the Mt. Kemble Center for 
Addictive Illnesses in Mor- 
ristown, Mr. Rosen held the 
position of vice president of 
marketing and public affairs. 
Mt. Kemble is an affiliate of 
Overlook Hospital for which he 
concurrently served as vice 
president of marketing and 
public affairs. 

Steven Wallach, attorney 
at law, has relocated his office 
for the general practice of law 
to 40 Nassau Street. Admitted 
to practice law in the State of 
New Jersey in 1976, he is a 
graduate of the University of 
Chicago Law School and holds 
M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in 
clinical psychology from Pur- 
due University. 

The Denver Public Library, 
through a citizens' committee 
appointed by Mayor Frederico 
Pena, has selected Michael 
Graves as design architect, 
and Klipp Partnership, Denver, 
as the prime architect, for the 
new Denver Central Library. 
The announcement concludes a 
four-month limited design com- 
petition process. 



Bulletin Notes 

Althea L. Tessier, a former 
visiting fellow at Princeton 
Theological Seminary, will give 
a lecture entitled "The Virgin 
Mary: Prototype of Church" 
Thursday at 8 at St. Paul 
Roman Catholic Church. 

Dr. Tessier, who makes her 
home in New Orleans, was a 
scholar-in-residence at Tantur, 
the ecumenical institute in 
Jerusalem, and a visiting 
fellow at Princeton Seminary. 
On her return to New Orleans, 
she taught for several years in 
the religious studies depart- 
ment of Loyola University. 

She was the founder and ex- 
ecutive director of an ecu- 
menical council in Princeton, 
an organization of Christian 
men and women from different 
denominational traditions 
which sponsored a program of 
lectures, study, discussions and 
worship designed to foster 
spiritual development and en- 
courage Christian community. 

New Covenant Evangel- 
ical Free Church, which 
meets at the Maurice Hawk 
School in West Windsor, will 
hold a Missions conference the 
week of April 21 to 27 in Prince- 
ton. The first meeting on Sun- 
day evening at Princeton Bap- 
tist Church, Penns Neck, will 
feature the Rev. Woody Phillips 
from Church of the Saviour in 
Wayne, Pa. speaking on "Why 
We Can't Sit on the Sidelines." 

Evening sessions Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday will 
focus on the Middle East, Asia 
and Eastern Europe, respect- 
ively. The conference will end 
Saturday, April 27, with an in- 
ternational dinner at Princeton 
Baptist Church. 

The Women's Guild for 
Christian Service of the 
Griggstown Reformed 
Church will hold its annual 
Spring Rummage Sale Friday 
from 9 to 7 and Saturday from 
9 to noon in the church hall, 1261 
Canal Road, Griggstown. 

On Saturday, shoppers can 
stuff a bag for $3. 

Princeton Church of 
Christ will sponsor a seminar 
on "personality types" Satur- 
day from 9 to 4. Led by Bruce 
and Beck Wadzeck, the semi- 
nar will give participants the 
opportunity to use a personal 
profile to determine their per- 
sonality type. The booklet, 
which includes the profile and 
interpretations, costs $10, but 
the seminar is free. 

Free child care will be pro- 
vided for pre-teenagers. 

Nassau Christian Center 

will present The Robe, a 
dramatization based on the 
novel by Lloyd C. Douglas, on 
Saturday and Sunday, April 27 
and 28, at 7:30. The Robe tells 
the story of the effect the r«be 
of Christ had on a Roman ninl- 
ed Marcellus. The production 
uses special music, costumes, 
full stage lighting and sound. 
There is no admission 
charge, but a free will offering 
will be taken. Nursery care will 
be available. For more infor- 
mation call 921-0981. 

Trinity Church, Crescent 
Avenue, Rocky Hill, will hold 
its annual Smorgasbord Supper 
Saturday, April 27, from 4:30 to 
7. The cost is $7.50 for adults 
and $4 for children under 12. 
Tickets may be purchased at 
the door. 

For information call 924-2482. 

Hopewell Presbyterian 
Church will hold its annual 
Spring Rummage Sale Thurs- 
day through Saturday, April 25 
through 27. There will be 



clothing for men, women and 
children, as well as linens, 
draperies, books, jewelry, toys 
and small appliances. 

Sale hours are 9:30 to 7 on 
Thursday, April 25; 9:30 to 8 on 
Friday, April 26; and 9:30 to 1 
on Saturday, April 27. On 
Thursday large items will be 
sold outside, weather permit- 
ting, beginning at 9. On Satur- 
day, everything will be $1 a 
bag. 



Recycling 

Borough 
this Monday 

Township 
this Tuesday 



; Lunch & Dinner 

5 Tue^Sun 11 am -9:30 pm I 

* Southern Weekend Brunch I 

Sal 8 Sun M:30 



E 



r****»«#*#^ 



A delegation of Soviet 
citizens are visiting the Prince- 
ton area through Saturday, 
hosted by Trinity Episcopal 
Church and other local groups 
which are participating in the 
citizen foreign exchange pro- 
gram known as "Bridges for 
Peace." Interested members of 
the community are invited to 
attend a potluck dinner and 
forum with the Soviets on 
Saturday at 6 at Trinity 
Church. 

The dinner is a chance to 
meet the Russians and ask 
questions about what 's going on 
in the Soviet Union, as well as 
to hear their impressions of our 
area. It is open to all; a $5 dona- 
tion will be accepted and those 
who attend are asked to bring* 
a main dish or salad to share. 

Trinity parishioners are ^ 
working with the New Jersey- f 
Volgograd State Bridge. A 
delegation of New Jerseyans 
will leave for Volgograd next 
September. 



The Princeton Theologic- 
al Seminary Singers and 
Chapel Choir will combine 
forces to present their spring 
concert on Friday at 8: 15 p.m. 
in Miller Chapel. David A. 
Weadon, director of music, has \ 
chosen an ail-American pro- ^^ 
gram of sacred music. 

The featured work is Leonard 
Bernstein's Chichester 
Psalms. Selections by 
Copland, Ives, Thompson, and 
Rorem are also programmed, 
as well as hymns and spirituals' 
by contemporary church musi- 
cians. 

Brenda Day, choir accom- 
panist, and an orchestra will 
join the choir. 

The concert is open to the 
public free of charge. 



Town Topics Readers 

In the last few weeks we have made several changes in 
our delivery. Some areas have new drivers while other 
areas have been added to the postal delivery,. If you 
are experiencing any problem with your delivery or 
would like your name on the mailing label, please call 
us at 924-2200. We would very much like to hear from 
you. 



Selden Dunbar Wick, ACSW, CAC 
Candace L Jones, ACSW 
Jan M. Kouzes, Ed.O 
Nancy Manning, Ph.D. (924-7883) 



Associates: 
Margaret A Carr, Ph.D. 
Linda Klee-Mueller, ACSW 
Kathrin W.Poole, ACSW 

Leigh Tilden, ACSW 



Princeton 
Psychological Associates 

14 Vandeventer Avenue 
Princeton, N.J. • (609) 683-4180 



M 


IP 




771-9280 



-WE ARE THE MILL* 

1661 N. OWen Ave. • Suburban Trenton 

(Next to Colonial CadilacJ 
* Over 1 million yards In stock 

■ Low, Low Prices on the Enure Wsverty Une 
and other Designer Fabric* 

■ Designer Showroom & Studio open to the Public 

■ Quality Cuatom Draperies, SUpoovere & 
Rauphoi storing 

■ 60-60* Off Pleated Shodea/Duettee, Mnl a 
Vartfcal Blinds 

a WE SERVICE COMMERCIAL ACCOUNTS ^d 




/VEDA 

hair care 



Ol I E ■ COIFFUR E 



INCORPORATED 
31 A Hulfish • Princeton • 609-924-3983 



The Women's Division of the 
Jewish Center will sponsor a 
performance of Jack and the 
Beanstalk, a live production by 
the Happy Times Theater for 
Children on Sunday, April 28, at 
1 at the Jewish Center. The per- 
formance is open to the public, 
and is recommended for 
children in nursery school 
through age 10. 

Tickets are $4 for children, $5 
for adults, and are available 
through area merchants. For 
further information, call 924- 
5886 or 936-0002. 

Mozart's The Magic Flute 
will be performed Sunday at 10 
at the Unitarian Church by 
Voices, ensemble of profes- 
sional soloists, a chamber or- 
chestra and the Unitarian 
Church Adult Choir. Coffee 
hour will follow the perform- 
ance, and brunch is also avail- 
able. 

Princeton United Method- 
ist Church will hold its spring 
rummage sale Thursday, April 
25, from 9 to 7:30, and Friday, 
April 26, from 9 to 3. Beginning 
Friday at noon, items can be 
purchased for half price or $2 
a bag. The rummage sale may 
be reached from the Vande- 
venter Avenue entrance. 

Montgomery United 
Methodist Church will hold 
its Spring Rummage Sale Fri- 
day and Saturday. Hours are 9 
to 4 on Friday and 9 to 2 on 
Saturday. 

Clothing will be offered at $2 
a bag all day Saturday. Con- 
tributions may be delivered 
Monday through Wednesday, 
April 15 to 17, from 9 to 3 and 
7 to 9. Call 874-3273 for more in- 
formation. 



CENTRAL JERSEY'S PREMIER 
PRE-OWNED AUTOMOBILE OUTLET 



1989 BMW 635 CSI 



Red with black leather int., 6 cyl, auto, PS, PB, AC. Mint 
condition. «t1/l QQQ 

VINK3268600. 15,345 miles. ^>01,333 



1985 MERCEDES 380SL 



Red with palomino leather int., 8 cyl, auto, PS, PB, AC, 2 
tops. Excellent condition. <toi QQQ 

VIN FA01 6551. 47,284 miles. «pO I ,»»» 



1986 MERCEDES 560SL 



Red with bone leather int., 8 cyl, auto, PS, PB, AC, 2 tops, 
car phone. All service records. One owner. *„* qqq 
VIN GA052686. 67,150 miles. ^O I ,»»» 



1988 MERCEDES 300E 



White with red int., 6 cyl, auto, PS, PB, AC. Excellent 
condition. All service records. <COC QQQ 

VIN JA655697. 42,874 miles. q>£U,»oa 



1987 JAGUAR XJ6 Vanden Plas 



Silver Birch with bone leather int., 6 cyl, auto, PS, PB, AC. 
VIN HC475933. 61 ,000 miles. $18,499 



Price(s) Include(s) all costs to b« paid by a consumer, 
except for licensing, registration and taxes. 



i_FiLURt=nc=e 



„_ The Relentless Pursuit Of Perfection. 
3333 Route 1 
Lawrenceville, NJ 
Directly Behind Denny's at Mercer Mall 

(609) 243-7077 



OBITUARIES 






visitor with many friends in 
shall College, where he was a Prince t onj where his parents 
member of Phi Kappa Sigma ha(f a nome on Cherry Hill 



fraternity. He also earned a 
master's degree from New 
York University. 



. Frauke P. Haasemann, 
< 68, assistant conductor of the 
S Westminster Choir and pro- 
3 fessor of conducting at West- 
I minster Choir College, died 
S April 12 in Princeton after a 

. battle against cancer. 
"> A leading authority on choral 

* conducting, Dr. Haasemann 

* was recently awarded an hon- 
° orary doctor of music degree 
o from Westminster. A specialist 
5 in group vocal techniques, the 
a 




Frauke P. Haasemann 



Road. 

Born in Butler, Pa., Mr. Mi- 
nor grew up in Buenos Aires 
and attended schools there un- 

He was a business education (j j ne en t e red Princeton in the 
teacher and a basketball coach e^iy 1940s Drafted into the Ar- 
at Bound Brook High School for during World War II, he 
three years before coming to grafted from Princeton with 
Princeton in 1938. He taught in (ne class [ 19 5o, having acted 
the commercial department at jn lavs f or Theatre Intime. 
Princeton High School for 37 After graduation he studied at 
years and was chairman of the lne Royal Academy of Drama- 
department when he retired in ( j c Arts m London. 
1975. 

In the 1950s, Mr. Borger was Mr Mjnor was instrumental 
a co-director of Camp Arrow- m p ro d U cing, directing and act- 
head, a summer camp for boys in „ in piays performed by 
held at the Squatters Club off Prjrlc eton University Plays 
Quaker Road. He was an ac- during the summer at Murray- 
countant for Springdale Golf Do dge Theatre. He also acted 



Adelaide Foster Howe, 89, 
of Monroe Village, died April 10 
after a brief illness. 

Born in Waterville, Me., she 
lived in Princeton and James- 
burg for the past 50 years. She 
was a graduate of Smith Col- 
lege, Class of 1923. 

Wife of the late Edward L. 
Howe, she is survived by a 
nephew, Dana F. Bresnahan of 
Pasadena, Calif.; a grand- 
niece, Regan Bresnahan of 
Seattle, Wash., and a grand- 
nephew, Fraser Bresnahan of 
New York City. 

TOWN TOPICS classified ads get 



.jj-.". Lamp Shades 

.'/.(.'ill'llul'iii ' Lamp Repairs 

Custom-made Lan-ps 

NASSAU INTERIORS! 




67 Palmer Si- West 

Princeton, 90 "8542 

(609)683-8288 



method conductors use to en , ,„„„„ , , 

„ hance the performance of cho- of Ewing, and Kjyda Bull ot club for 30 years and also serv- a nd directed at McCarterThea- 

C ral music, she assisted major Ewing; and dear friends Dons ed as treasurer of the Prince- tre in the spr j n g of 1962 while 

1 choral organizations interna- and VmcentHoyer of Harbour- t0 n Hospital Gift Shop when it MjUon Lyon was executive 
1- tionally in mastering the vocal 'on. was established and as treasur- director of the theater. 

5 technical demands of standard The service was held Satur- er of the hospital's chaplain's i n New York he worked at 

2 works, allowing the singers to day at Hopewell funeral home, fun d. He was a member of the me Sheridan Square Playhouse 
h unite as an ensemble. u« Rev William McQuoid, Firs t Presbyterian Church of and at Circle in the Square and 

pastor of Pennington Presby- Cranbury andti former mem- was a me mber of the A.P.A. 
Dr. Haasemann came to tenan Church, officiating. Bur- ber of NasS au Presbyterian reDer tory company. He direct- 
Westminster Choir College in 'a' was in Harbourton Ceme- churcn 



ed at regional theaters around 
the country, including Trinity 

Surviving are his wife, Mary Repertory Company in Pro- 
H. Borger; two sons, Richard v j de nce R.I., the Pittsburgh 
E. Jr. of East Granby, Conn., p^,. Theatre, the Milwaukee 
and Thomas P. of New York; Repertory Theater, the Tyrone 
four grandchildren; and a Gut h r ie Theater in Minne- 
brother, John. apolis, the Dallas Theater Cen- 

A graveside service was held ter and the Old Globe Theater 
Friday at Princeton Cemetery, jn San Dieg0| among others. 



1977 to teach conducting and teI T- 

voice. As assistant conductor of " ' 

the Westminster Choir, she Anne Pierre Dennen, 86, 

worked with Joseph Flum- died April 10 at Princeton Nurs- 

merfelt to prepare the choir for ing Home. 

performances and recordings Born in Princeton, Mrs. Den- 

with leading orchestras, in- nen was a lifelong Princeton 

eluding the New York Philhar- resident and a graduate of 

monic, The Philadelphia Or- Princeton High School. She 

chestra and the Vienna served for many years as the Rev. Jean K.Thies.associ 

Philharmonic. supervisor of the scoring ate pastor of First Presbyteri 

department at Educational an Church of Cranbury, of- 

She was also a noted soloist Testing Service, retiring after f j c j a tj n g. Memorial contribu- 

of oratorio literature and per- 25 years. tions may be made to the 

formed hundreds of times with Parkinson's Disease Founda- 

orchestras in Europe and the Wife of the late Joseph R. tion, 650 West 168th Street, New RmnYnBtan^oneee" 

United States. She was the con- "Duke" Dennen, who died in York NY ioo 3 2-9982. s™ 

tralto soloist on more than 90 1949, and mother of the late Arrangements were under , , in , - ra i vin anrf fvn 

recordings, performing works Anne Dennen Ginter of Levit- lhe direction of the Kimble s1 ' 

by Schutz, Bach, Mendelssohn, town, Pa., she is survived by F une ral Home. 

and Distler. She recently pro- twin sons, J. Robert of Radnor, 

duced an instructional video, Pa., and Bruce P. of Green 
"Group Vocal Techniques," wich. Conn.; six grandchild 
with James Jordan of Hartt ren; and a sister, Helen P 
School of Music. Cherry of Bensalem, Pa 



In addition to directing plays, 
Mr. Minor staged operas for 
the San Francisco Opera Com- 
pany and the Waverly Consort. 
He also taught and directed at 



thia Minor of Pennington 
sister, Virginia, of Princeton; 
two nieces and a nephew. 

At his request there will not 
be a funeral service. Contribu- 



John L. Dilworth, 76, 

former Princeton Postmaster, 

died April 8 at Princeton Medi- tions in his name may be made 

cal Center. to the Hospice Program at 

Born in Princeton, Mr. Princeton Medical Center, 253 

,, ,„< v all n lurope. with burial in Princeton Cem- Oilworth was a lifelong resi- Witherspoon Street, Princeton 

nieces, au^rng urope Contributions may be dent. He retired in 1972 from 08540. 

A memorial service will be made to Fox Chase Cancer ">e V.S. Postal Service after 30 

held Saturday at 4 in Bristol Center, a favorite charity of years of employment. For the 

Chapel on the Westminster Mrs. Dennen's because it cared ' ast 13 years of his career he Mary Tevere, 46, of Hope- 
Choir College campus. Burial for her late daughter, at PO was the postmaster at the wel , ^^ AprU 10 of injuries 

.... . ° v r,— , MH r,u:i„.i„t„v.:.. n„ Pa mpr Snnarp Post Office. l.-: , :_ - l :J *!_ 



She is survived by three The service was held Satur- 
brothers, three nephews and day at Kimble Funeral Home °™ 't 
H., n ntAnoc att Wnn in Cxmno with hnri;, I in Princeton Cem- Liuworul 



year's senior class, an under- 
graduate scholarship to West- 
minster Choir College has been 
established in honor of Frauke 
Haasemann. Contributions 
may be sent to the Office of De- . 
velopment, Westminster Choir ton . IWe ™ c . a .' ,9 en J te . r ; 
College, Hamilton at Walnut, 
Princeton 08540". 

Catherine Owens, RSCJ, 



will be private Box 42630, Philadelphia, Pa. Palmer Square Post Office. 

Through the initiative of this 19161, or to Trinity Church, 33 ; 

Mercer Street, Princeton 08540. He was a former member of 
the Squatters Club of Prince- 
ton; Princeton Lodge No. 38 
MackieD. Mott Jr., 58, of F&AM; the Retired Post- 
Tomlyn Drive, died April 13 masters; and the Princeton packet as office managerof the 
suddenly on arrival at Prince- United Methodist Church. Hopewell Valley News She was 
Husband of the late Muriel IE. an auxiliary member of the 
Mr. Mott lived in Madison, Dilworth and brother of Esther Hopewell American Legion 
Conn., before moving to Johnston, he is survived by two Post 339 and a member of St 
Princeton to be vice president sons, Lawrence J. of Pough- Alphonsus Church in HopeweU. 
of marketing for Astra Jet keepsie, N.Y., and John R. 
Corp. of Princeton. He had pre- Dilworth of San Antonio, Tex. ; 
63, died April 2 at Kenwood viously worked for Sikorsky seven grandchildren; and a 
Convent of the Sacred Heart, Aircraft in Stamford, Conn. He great-granddaughter. 

Albany, NY., after a long ill- was a former professional 

ness - musician and a member of the The service was held Thurs- wi n iam and Garv vnnrhees 

A graduate of Manhattanville Princeton Free Wheelers and day at Mather-Hodge Funeral homofVnnin^n twotist^' 
College, with masters degrees the Princeton United Methodist Home, the Rev. James W. ' B ' ' " 

from Columbia University and Church. Robinson, pastor for visitation 

Weston School of Theology, at Princeton United Methodist 

Sister Owens had taught in Father of the late Thomas M. Church, officiating. Burial was 
many of the 19 schools directed Mott, he is survived by his wife, in Princeton Cemetery. 

by the Society of the Sacred IhokoK. Mott; two daughters, 

, inde M Mickle of Peekskill Mildred L. McMahan, 62, 

N.Y.andGlennaA. Marinoof f Princeton Junction, died was scheduled to be celebrated 

Lewisberry, Pa.; and four April 9 at Princeton Medical this Wednesday at 10 a.m. in St 

grandchildren Center. Alponsus Church, Princeton 

u A'njmona' se™" wdl be BorninGreenville,S.C.,Mrs. Avenue and Prospect Street, 

held Friday at 3 at Princeton McMahan lived in the Prince- Hopewell with burial in 

United Methodist Church, Dr. ton Junction area for 20 years. Highland Cemetery, Hopewell 

James H. Harris Jr., pastor, of- Sne was a former member of In Ueu of flowers, memorial 

ficiatmg. Visitation will be the Junior Women's Club of contributions may be made to 

Th^dayfrom4to6atMather- Bethpage, N.Y. Camden Cooper Trauma Cen 

Hodge Funeral Home 40 Van- ter, Camden 08100 or West- 

deventer Avenue. Memorial Surv i ving are her husband, hampton Emergency Squad 

Mary C. Hart, 101, died contributions may be made to j0S eph W. McMahan; a son, PO Box 6, Wood Lane Road' 

April 10 in Franklin Convales- the organ fund of Princeton Kendrick McMahan, a daugh- Mount Holly 08060 

cent Center in Franklin Park. United Methodist Church, 7 ter, Patricia Vicente ViUeda ■ 

She was born and lived all of Vandeventer Avenue, Prince- an d her mother Zadie Reid 



Heart throughout the United 
States. In 1986, she joined the 
faculty at Stuart Country Day 
School of the Sacred Heart 
where she was a teacher of Lat- 
in and religion and director of 
liturgical planning. 

A Mass of the Resurrection 
was celebrated at Kenwood. 
She is survived by her mother 
and a sister. 



sustained in an auto accident in 
Westhampton. 

Born in Doylestown, Pa 
Mrs. Tevere was a lifelong 
Hopewell resident. She was 
employed by the Princeton 



Surviving are her husband, 
Anthony Tevere; two daugh- 
ters, Audrey and Michele, 
both at home; two brothers, 



f Pennington; two sisters, 
Cheryl Varga of Yardley, Pa., 
and Cindy Haney of Trenton; 
her stepfather, Wyne Brother- 
ton of Hopewell; and several 
aunts, uncles, nieces and 
nephews. 
A Mass of Christian Burial 



her life in Harbourton. She 
worked for her father, the late 
Samuel Hart, who was a tax 
collector in Harbourton. She 
was a member of the Penning' 



ton 08540. Bridges, all of Princeton Junc- 

tion. 

Richard E. Borger, 82, of . TJ? f T ral a !l d b c ur ' a ' were 
v.n™«viii=..» i„„«n™.h..«i. held in Greenville, S.C. A me- 



Monroe Village, longtime bus! 
ness education teacher at 



mortal service will be held at a 



K^Cnap^tne P^eZ m^^ch^died .ater date in Princeton, 
E^ternltar P ^ l » at - Monroe Villa S e 



Health Care Center. 
Born in Lancaster, Pa. 



Mr. Philip Minor, 63, a director 



Wife of the late Ernest Hart, „ , 

she is survived by cousins Reba BorgerhvedmPrmcetonforSO who ^spec.ahzed ,n directing ;the 
Hunt of Harbourton Alice Hunt years before movmg to Monroe works of Shakespeare, Shaw 
Hunt 01 Harbourton, Alice Hunt vma g e m 1988. He received his and Eugene O'Neill, died April 
bachelor's degrees in business 9 at his brother's home in Penn- 
administration and education ington. He acted and directed in 
in 1930 from Franklin and Mar- Princeton and was a frequent 



IF YOU DON'T READ TOWN TOPICS, 

how will you keep up with the news? 



Margaret Elizabeth 
Payne Steinline 

The lamily ot the late Matgatet 
Elizabeth Payne Steinline. 
wishes to express out apptecia- 
tion and gtatitude lor the many 
acts of kindness that were 
bestowed upon us during our 
bereavement ot the loss of our 
dear one. 

Sincerely, 

Mose Steinline 

Daughter ■ Sheila Wooding 

Grandson - Terry Wooding 



DECORATE YOUR HOME 




^ 



FOR SPRING 



<$ 



• Silk & dried flowers 

• Decorated straw & 
grapevine wreaths 

"■ blooming pansies, violas 

& johnny jump-ups <& 
In pocks, hanging gardens & planters 

Don't Forget Secretaries' Week 
April 21-26 



( • Fresh Cut Flower Specials ») 

Blooming and green plants 
to brighten your indoors 

Perna's ^ 

Plant and Flower Shop 

189 Washington Rd. 

(Vt Mile East of Rt. 1) 

452-1383 

Mon-Sat 8:30-5:00; Sun 10:004:00 j 




REUSABLE SHIELD 

FOR MODERATE INCONTINENCE PROTECTION 




Salk's new Carefor Reusable Shields are the perfect 
lightweight undergarment for men and women with 
mild to moderate bladder-control problems. Adjustable 
Vetera waist bands allow you to tailor-fit the shield for 
secure daytime use. 



/" 



W. Scott Taylor 

Surgical Supply Since 1875 

(Just off the Brunswick Circle) 
940 Brunswick Ave., Trenton, NJ 609-599-9371 



PRINCETON SMALL ANIMAL 

RESCUE LEAGUE 

900 HERRONTOWN ROAD 

PRINCETON, NJ 08540 

Male Labrador/Shepherd type, 3 
mos., all shots. 

j.. Male Bassett Hound. 3 yrs., good 
L disposition. 

Male Springer Spaniel. 2 yrs.. with 
papers. 

Female Golden Retriever, adult, 
spayed, 6 yrs.. good disposition. 

Female purebred Husky, spayed, 2 
yrs.. good with children. 

Male Shepherd/Husky type. 2 yrs. 
H Male Golden Retriever type, 40 lbs. 

Male CollieVHusky, 2 yrs. 

Male Chihuahua. 9 months. 

Female Shepherd/Collie, spayed, 2 
yrs., all shots, good disposition. 

Female Husky/Border Collie type, 
black and white, good pet. 

Male Collie/Shepherd type, black/tan, 
"friendly. 

Altered male blue-eyed silver colored 
Siberian Husky, purebred, good disposi- 
tion. 

Call us about our cats. 



"SUNNY, PRIVATE APARTMENT: 

Apartment suite attached to private 
home with separate entrance, deck, 
kitchen and bath, fully turnished and 
only 5 minutes Irom the center ot 
Princeton. $825 including utilities tor a 
short term lease, month to month. Start- 
ing immediately, call 466-0158. 

4-17-2t 

FOR RENT: Beautiful cottage with yard 
and garden, parking for two cars, two 
blocks from University. Built in 1870, 
hardwood floors, new kitchen, two bed- 
rooms, one bath. $890 plus utilities. Call 
before 9 a.m. or after 6 p.m. 924-51 15. 
4-17-2t 



PRINCETON STUOIO APARTMENT- 

View on Palmer Square Fireplace and 
Pullman kitchen. S695ftnonth includes 
heat and hot water. Available May Call 
924-9009 4 y 17 . 3t 



MAHOGANY KITTINGER Hepplewhrte- 
style sideboard with book, line and tan 
inlay; large six branch crystal chande- 
lier; mahogany game table with maple 
inlay; Georgian mahogany tilt-top 
breakfast table; pair ol mahogany cor- 
ner cupboards with glass doors with re- 
verse painting on doors; cherry drop- 
leaf tables; pine two-part hutch; two 
mahogany Georgian slant front desks 
tall case clocks; wall clocks; mirrors; 
mahogany butler's secretary desk; 
porcelains; lamps; Sheraton New 
England four-drawer chest with biscuit 
corners; mahogany English four-drawer 
chest; several pairs of chairs. Pine cor- 
ner cupboard with glass doors; pine 
splayed-leg stand; cherry Pembroke 
table; 10 x 18 Oriental rug, Chinese 
design, russet background. English 
demi-lune mahogany table with mold- 
ed legs. Walnut rope bed; maple rope 
bed; mahogany piecrust tilt-top table; 
Queen Anne style dining table; set of 6 
Queen Anne style dining chairs. 4 side 
and 2 arm. Blanket chests, pine 
schoolmaster's desk, pine three-drawer 
chest. Field Antiques. 49 State Road, 
Princeton 921-0303. 

4-17-31 

WORK WANTED: Moving and hauling, 
yards, attics and cellars cleaned. (908) 
329-6169. 4-17-31 

REMODELING SALE: Used ap- 
pliances, all in good working condition. 
Cash & carry. Hotpoint no frost 2-door 
refrigerator with automatic icemaker, 
32"w„ 67"h., 29"d.. $75. GE electric 
slide-in double oven with 4 cook top 
burners. 40"w., 37"h.. 24"d., $40. Kit- 
chenaid Superba dishwasher, built-in, 
stainless steel front, 24"w., 34"h„ 
24"d., $35. Please call 924-1475 
anytime. 4-17-3t 



MOTHERS PLANNING ON GOING 

back to work? Leave your child with 
confidence in my home for loving care 
years of experience and finest refer- 
ences Call 924-2158. 4-3-tf 

EXPERT GARDENER & MASON: Will 
take care ot your lawn & shrubs. Spring 
clean-up. All types of garden & masonry 
work. Free consultations. (609) 497- 
0579. 3.27-14, 

APARTMENT FOR RENT: Center of 
town, 2 bedrooms, living room, kitchen 
and private bath. For information call 
921-8237. 4^. 5t 

LEON VIELAND 
PIANO TUNING 

Repair - Regulation 



RENTALS 

UNFURNISHED 

PLAINSBORO: Lovely, light, spacious 
third floor unit with plenty of storage. Two 
bedrooms, two full baths. Loft. Fireplace 
and rn-unrt laundry room. $850.00 per 
month. 

SUMMER RENTAL 

PRINCETON: Charming in-town house 
on quiet street. Four bedrooms and 1 Vi 
baths. Available June 15th to September 
1st $1,500 per month. 

Stewardson-Dougherty 

Real Estate Associates, Inc. 

366 Nassau Street, Princeton, NJ 

609-921-7784 

EXCELLENT HOUSE CLEANING ser 

vice available. Daytime, hard working, 
experienced, trustworthy, excellent re- 
ferences, have own car. Call Roger 
Martmdell. 683-1461. leave message 
lor Miss Cortez or Mr Lopez. 4-17-4t 

ORIENTAL RUGS AND TAPESTRIES 1 984 FORD ESCORT: 2 -door 
bought for cash. Call 201-944-4001. automatic. 50K. V/z year iransler war- 
11-28-tt ranty available. $1500. 895-1348. 



924-6709 



SEWING: SLIPCOVERS, CURTAINS, 

cushions and other home lurnishmgs. 
Alterations and repairs of clothing. 
Miranda Short, 921-1908. 9-19-39t 



OFFICE SPACE 
RESEARCH PARK 

Wall Street, Princeton, N.J. 

Starting at $ 7.Q0 per square foot net, net 

Areas up to 10,000 square feet 

427,000 square feet in Park 
Occupied by approximately 50 tenants . 

Princeton Mailing Address 
Princeton Phone Number 



Call: Research Park 



609-924-6551 



DON'T LEAVE FOR VACATION with- 
out having your valuables appraised. R. 
Harris Block, I.S.A. & A.A.A. Call (609) 
924-4322. 4-17-2t 

ANTIQUE CHERRY dining table, 2 drop 
leaves, 45" wide, 65" long when open- 
' ed. Two cane-bottomed side chairs. 
$6,500 for table, $150 for two chairs. 
Call 924-4974 after 3 p.m. 

PRINCETON: LARGE GARDEN Apart- 
ment, 1200 sq. ft., newly renovated. 
Large back yard, private entrance and 
drive with garage. Beautiful wooded 
area 5 minutes from town. $1050 in- 
, . eludes utilities and washer/dryer. 924- 
^ 4210 after 5 p.m. 

f . ESTATE JEWELRY: Tiffany 4 c. dia- 
' ~mond cluster 18 k. gold ring. Currently 
$12,000, sacrifice $6,000. Also 18 k. 
gold emerald and diamond necklace, 
bracelet, cabochon ring, Cartier band, 
cluster stud earrings. Perfect for May 

9 birthdays, Mother's Day and gradua- 
tion. Call 520-0259 for appointment. 

LARGE CHINESE CURIO cabinet with 
mirrored shelves arid lights inside, 
rosewood, collectors items including 
ginger jars, ivory, oriental rug, porcelain 
elephant. Leave name and message 
520-0720. 4-17-21 

LAWRENCEVILLE SOCIETY HILL, 

Cold Soil: two bedroom tawnhouse 
recently painted, wooded view, all ap- 
pliances, upgrades, custom drapes, 
a/c. Priced to sell at only $99,900. 609- 
895-1445. 4-17-2t 



HOUSE FOR RENT: in prestigious 
Princeton private wooded setting. One 
master bedroom, living room/dining 
room, with cathedral ceilings, plus sec- 
ond floor loft/bedroom. Kitchen, 
washer/dryer, central AC. fully 
carpeted, etc. One car garage. Must 
see to believe. $900 month. Available 
June 1. Call today (or appointment, 
(609)921-1421. 4-17-3t 

HOUSEHOLD AND FINE ART Ap- 
praisal Service for estate and insurance 
purposes. Call Field Antiques, 49 State 
Road. Princeton. 609-921-0303. tf 

MOORE'S CONSTRUCTION 
AND HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

Interior Renovations 

Exterior 924-6777 Alterations 

References - Princeton - Insured 

Estimates Given 

4-17-4t 

FRENCH LESSONS: Spring term - 
beginner to advanced. Grammar, con- 
versation, reading. Native teacher. 
(609) 921-0492. 

HOUSE FOR RENT: Charming 3- 
bedroom house with 2-car garage on 
beautilul street in the heart of Princeton 
Borough. Walk everywhere. $1650- 
month includes gardener, lawn mainte- 
nance, snow removal. Available June 
1, possibly earlier. 921-3466. 

MOTOR HOME: 1983 Leprechaun 
Coachman. Very good condition. 
55,000 miles. A/C. ps, pb. good tires, 
sleeps six. Best offer. (609) 737-2164. 



WORD PROCESSING: Editorial, public 
relations, and newsletters. MS in Jour- 
nalism. Convenient in-town location. 
Call 921-6488. 3-6-tf 

FIREWOOD FOR SALE: Half cord $70 
full cord $135. Selected hardwoods, 
seasoned, split, delivered and stacked 
Call Jim, 924-3470. 12-5-tf 

A CLEAN HOUSE Is a Happy House! 
Please call me for a terrific continental 
cleaning service. High qualify, depen- 
dable cleaning to help you run your 
house your way! Excellent references. 
Renata, 683-5889. 

PROFESSIONAL HOUSE PAINTING: 

Interior-Exterior. 1 5 years ol experience, 
lop quality work. Reliable, neat, insured. 
Robert Speagle. 895-9876. 11-8-tf 



$1,000.00 



$ 



coupon 



$1,000 ,00 



Limit One Coupon Per House 




230 Varsity Ave., Princeton, NJ 

Present this coupon at dosing and $1000.00 will be deduced from Uie agreed upon price 



L000,_QP 



COUPON 



iLOOOOQ. 



One of a kind! Exceptional stone cape in West Windsor with very 
close proximity to the university campus Walk to the tiain 
Seven rooms include 2 bedrooms, remodeled bath new der, or 
sunroom, dining room, living room with stone front fireplace 
and built-in bookcases. Many other features all on well tended half 
acre. Upstairs is room for 2 more bedrooms and a bath. $206,UUU 

Open house Saturday and Sunday from 1-4 p.m. (609) 452-9567 

For sale by owner. No brokers please. 



P.M. ROJEK 

BLOWN IN INSULATION 

609-586-2048 




CALL NOW FOR 
FREE INSULATION SURVEY 




■ ATTIC • WALLS • CRAWL SPACES - 



DON'T LEAVE FOR VACATION with 
out having your valuables appraised. R. 
Harris Block. I.S.A, & A.A.A. Call (609) 
924-4322. 4-17-2t 

SKI VAIL ON A TRADE: A very respon- 
sible person would like to trade lovely 
Vail condo with view of mountains and 
runs anytime you want lor the week ol 
May 26 through June 3 at your New 
Jersey shore house or condo. 609-924- 
7434. 4-17-21 

RUMMAGE SALE: Princeton United 
Methodist Church, Nassau and Van- 
deventer. Thursday, April 25, 9 to 7:30, 
and Friday. April 26, 9 to 3. After 12 on 
Friday, $2 a bag or half price. 

4-17-2t 

FOR SALE: Fiberglas all-new rowing 
shell, 2 pairs ol oars, 7'/2 ft. and 9 ft. 
Made by Collar ol England with an Oar- 
master for each set. 921-1611. 

4-17-21 



FOR SALE BV OWNER: Sunny, three- 
bedroom Princeton Borough duplex. 
Walk everywhere! Living room with bay 
window, working fireplace, spacious 
dining room, remodeled, eat-in kitchen. 
1 Va baths, high ceilings, large yard. On 
lovely "tree" street. Five minute walk to 
campus. Move-m condition. Price 
$209,000. call 921-6493. 




Muiytd&ak\p*. 



axhadedc 

Wxxien Patio Decks 

'AN INDEPENDENTLY-OPERATED DEAlEfi- 



AMERIOVS DECK BUILDER 

Free Estimates 

You'll be surprised at how 
affordable quality can be. 

• No hidden costs. 

• Backed by the strongest 
warranty in the industry. 

• Convenient financing 
available. 

• Fully insured 

• References 

908-788-7422 1-800-462-1407 

• Gazebos • Planters • Screened Porches 

» Trellises • Decks • Benches • Walkways 

Built-in Water Repellent 

106 Mine Street, Flemington, NJ 



■VJa1JUJJJL»!JLj1aUJL^ 



STEWARDSON-DOUGHERTY 

T{ea/ Estate -Associates, Incorporated 

366 S\assau Street, 'Princeton, .T^ew "Jersey 08540 

TAone: 609-Q2 1 -7784 




: 



: 



MARSHALL ROAD 
NESHANIC 

Sparkling four-bedroom Colonial in a lovely family neighborhood thai in- 
cludes many extras such as fenced rear yard, enlarged deck, central air, 
alarm system, professional landscaping, and two finished basement 
rooms. Priced to sell. $235,000 



■T-T-T-TWr-rmTyryryrT-^^ 



. 



VISITING THE UNIVERSITY? Bed 4 SUMMER RENTAL: PRINCETON. LANDSCAPING SERVICE: Pioles- 

Charming. well-furnished 3-slcwy lovwv sional landscaping lawn service Fer- 
house near University and downtown (ii, zef mulching. Spring clean-up. etc.' 
Ouiet street, 2 bedrooms, large study, 609-530 1291 3-6-81 

grand piano, 3 baths, central A/C Avail- 

able June 11 to August 18, 1991 THR|PT SH OP: VICTORIA'S ATTIC 
Nonsmokers only, no pets $1200/ has men . s womens and children's 
month plus untitles Call 609-683-4076 clo ,h ing , Ioys> housewares and baby 

4 ,17 -4' lurniture. Closed Sunday and Monday 

3001 Route 27 (Fmnegans Lane). 

LAWN SERVICE: Grass cutting and Franklin Park 297-1066 3-20-61 

trimming. Cecilio Orantes Call after 5 — ■ 

p.m. 609-695-5892 4-17-41 



txeakJast accommodations available m 
elegant Victonan house in downtown 
Princeton Long term accommodat)ons 
also available with kitchen & laundry 
privileges 663-0443 3-6-101 

BRYN MAWR BOOK SALE 
May 1 • 5. 1991 

Book donations gladly accepted 

Wednesday and Saturday, 

10 am to noon 

Behind 32 Vandeventer Avenue 

609-921-7479 4-17-3t 



TILE 

DISCOUNT CENTER 

Capitol Plaza 

Trenton 392-2300 

Carpeting - Ceramic Tile 



PIHONE 

LANDSCAPING SERVICE 



FOR SALE: 1968 VOLKSWAGON 

Cabriolet, all white, deluxe, 5-speed, 
12,300 r tiles. $9,995, 921-2650. 95 

3-27-51 



VOICE LESSONS by experienced 
teacher in Princeton Popular and 

classical. Beginners through advanced ■ ■ 

Juilliard graduate. Masters degree WORK WANTED: Moving and hauling 

Friendly and relaxed atmosphere Call Yards attics and cellars cleaned Con- 

ProCessionaJ landscaping & lawn serv>ce Steven Schnurman. 924-5883 2-20-rf aele work dor>e call 396-0165 or 989 



924-3242 

aft 
eaners 

*>25 Nassau Street- 



FURLONG 
PRESSURE WASHING 

WE CLEAN ALL EXTERIOR SURFACES 

ALUMINUM STUCCO WOOD 
VINYL BRICK 

REMOVAL OF MOLD, MILDEW, DIRT, AND GRIME 
SKILLMAN, N.J. (609)466-28 53 



Customized commercial 
Residential service 

Free consultations 

Call anytime 

(609)663-0774 



EXCEPTIONAL HOUSE CLEANER: 

Available Saturdays Super- responsi- 
ble, English speaking Call 683-5889 
4-17-4t 



0130 any lime 



TOP DOLLAR PAID: LP's, cassettes, 

CD's rock, classical, jazz. etc. Prince- 
ton Record Exchange. 20 Tulane 
Street. Princeton 921-0881 9-11-tl 



™ FURNISHED HOUSE FOR RENT: 3 

bedrooms. 2 baths, near shopping cen- BEAUTIFUL, CUSTOM-MADE dra 

WORD PROCESSING: Pick-up and tor New grand piano - central air Avail- pe , ies period window treatments of all 

delivery. From short correspondence to able July '91 to Augusl '92 $1500- tvpes Slipcovers and line re-upholstery 

lengthy documents From rough drafts month plus utilities and security dapos- Shades and blinds. Fabric and 




V 



to printer-ready mechanicals 
graphics and/or photographs. Am. 924- , 
1330 tf 



it 609-921-9205 



GOVERNMENT HOMES 



URGENTLY NEEDED: Used clothing, From $1 (U repair) 

lurniture, household articles and knick- Delinquent tax property. Reposessions. 
knacks Please call the Rescue Mission 

ol Trenton, 695-1436, to arrange lor Your area (1) 805-962-8000 Ext GH- 
pickup. 3-6- 1 1 1 1436 for current repo list. 3-13-81 



wallcovering at discount. Serving all 
your interior design needs with in-home 
or office consultation. Estimates cheer- 
fully given, Call Sherry. The Creative 
Heart (609) 397-2120 



ROOM FOR RENT: Central Nassau B pp Q e S p S sp D VA A H UD HOMES 

Slreet. walk to campus Large, bright. REPOSSESSED VA A HUD HOMES 
low rent, near bus and shops 924- available Irom government IromSI. You 
2040 1-2-tf f epa" N° credit check. Also drug 
seizures and IRS foreclosures sold for 



FLOOR SANDING, STAINING 
& REFINISHING 



Hardwood Floors Installed 



BEST FLOOR CO. 

924-4897 



PROFESSIONAL OFFICE: Princeton 
Ideal for those in cognitive disciplines, 
2 rooms — 434 square feel. Ample 
parking, central location, busline. 21 
North Harrison Street. Scot Ware. 921- 
1050. 3-20-121 

WANTED: GUNS, SWORDS, military 
items Licensed dealer will make house 
calls and pay more Call Bert (201) 821- 
4949 4-1 0-H 

RETAIL STORE OR OFFICE SPACE 

lor rent, center of town For information " 
call 921-8237. 4-3-5t 

Schwlnn 
New and Used Bicycles 
Sales, Service 
Parts and Repairs 
KOPP'S CYCLE 
38 Spring Street 

£24-1052 |l 



back (axes. 
Call 1-805-682-7555 Ext. H-2516 
for repo Nat your area, 

(Open 7 days a week) 

4-10-81 

VITTORIO PIRONE 
LANDSCAPE CONTRACTOR 

Gardening - Complete Lawn 
Maintenance and Service 



LIGHT RENTALS 

Princeton Township apartment, available 
Apnl 1, heat included, $775/month. 

, Ciranbury: lovely old town. Nice old Col- 
onial, 3 bedrooms, available July 1 or 
earlier. $1100/monlh. 

K.M. LIGHT REAL ESTATE, Broker 

247 Nassau St. 
Princeton, N.J. 609-924-3822 



609-924-6469 



. PRINCETON: ON BAYARD LANE: liv 



BED AND BREAKFAST of Princeton 
has comfortable and economical ac- 
commodations in local private homes 
for your visiting triends, relatives, wed- 
ding guests and business associates. 
B&B, P.O. Box 571. Princeton, N.J. 
08540 924-3189 6-4-H 

BOOKS WANTED - HARDBOUND 

books in good condition, new or old. 
Cash or trade. Rising Sun Bookshop, 
33 West Btoad Slreet. Hopewell. Call 
466-4465 4-10-tt 



ing room, dining room. 2 bedrooms, kit- 
PtANO LESSONS: Professional pianist chen and bath. S750/month includes 
offers lessons in classical, jazz, rock and heat, water and parking. Associates Re- 
popular. Will travel in Princeton vicini- ally: 924-6501. 4-10-31 

ty. Call 924-3170. 2-6 tf 

THE OUTGROWN SHOP now "Nearly 

New" Shop. New name — old manage- 
ment. Abundance ol ladies' spring 
dresses, plus clothes (or whole family. 
Behind 234 Nassau Street 924-5720. 
4-10-3t 



NANTUCKET - DIRECT 
RAINBOW AIR CHARTERS 

$100 off-peak 
RAINBOW AIR INC. 

arranges shared charters on O.O. T. 

certified air carriers 

609-921-3867 

FILING CABINETS: Come and see our 

metal cabinets lor office or home. Grey, 
tan, olive, 2 or 4 drawer. Also typing 
tables, Hlnkson's, 82 Nassau. 1-12-tf 



BUSINESS OFFER 

16% return on Investment 

Buy our Piper Chieftain aircraft 

which is leased to a third party 

at 16% return on the purchase price. 

RAINBOW AIR, INC. 921-3867 



.T2ST _, SERV,CE: Newark/Ken OFFICE SPACE, CENTRAL NASSAU 

nedy/Philadelphia. Your car or mine STREET recently decorated, low rent, 
Princeton/Lawrenceville area. Reason- available now. telephone and recep- 
able. Day or night, (609) 921-3643 tionist service 924-2040 tf 



Call Coldwell Banker 

SCHLOTT REALTORS 




PRINCETON JUNCTION 

Walk to train, schools & shopping. Great neighborhood for kids! Beautifully 
renovated home in move-in condition. New roof, gas furnace, C/A, range. 
3/4 bedrooms, 2 full baths, detached garage, full basement, wooded and 
fenced private yard. $172,000. PRJ1267. 



SO Princeton-Hightstown Road 

Princeton Junction, NJ 08550 • 609-799-8181 



CROSSROADS 

I 

N 
C 
E 
T 
O 
N 

Built circa 1929 — this Norman-style house sits on almost 
REALTOR a na |) acre in the heart of Princeton — Walk to classes at the 
University, to your favorite restaurant, to the movies — this uni- 
que house has 4 bedrooms, 3Vz baths, fireplaces in all the 
right places, a huge studio/family room which opens on to a 
walled garden. * $595,000 

Princeton Crossroads Realty, Inc. 

609-924-4677 

342 Nassau Street (Corner Harrison) • Princeton • Park in our lot 







■ 



' 



Pc'ljfOII 



DESPERA TEL Y SEEKING... 

The spring market has been so brisk that we are in need 
of listings for some particular customers who have re- 
quested that we find them a certain type of house. 
IF YOU HAVE CONSIDERED SELLING, give us a 
call.. .we may have the perfect buyer for you. 



We have had requests for the following: 

• Small charmer in Princeton in the $250,000 price range; 

• Handsome and larger with some land in the 
$800,000 to $1 ,000,000 range; 

• Three or four bedrooms in the $350,000 
to $400,000 range; 

• Within walking distance of the University for 
around $350,000; 

• "Something Unique" for about $500,000 

IF YOU ARE LOOKING TO BUY, we have many inter- 
esting listings in all price ranges. At Peyton we try to 
match the buyer with the ideal home...that's why we need 
help in filling these very special requests 



Princeton 

609-921-1550 



Peyton Associates 

Realtors 

Pennington 

609-737-9550 



J 







OPEN HOUSE 
APRIL 21, 1-4 P.M. 

Enjoy indoor, outdoor entertaining with this easy flow floor 
plan. Just a step down from the kitchen to the light and 
spacious living room/dining room addition, then through the 
sliding glass doors onto the patio. Half an acre of fenced 
backyard provides good space for children, pets, garden- 
ing and barbeques. 3/4 bedrooms, 2 baths, 2 fireplaces and 
secluded study are just a few special features of this River- 
side property. Princeton Twp. $325,000. Please call the 
Hopewell Office at 609-466-1600. 

DIRECTIONS: Nassau St. to Riverside, to Longview, to Knoll, house on left. 



JOHN I 

HENDERSON 

laisblHl REALTORS VJ 



iisr 



mj. 



37 West Broad Street, Hopewell, N.J. (609) 466-1600 




MAKE YOUR DREAM A REALITY 
IN ELM RIDGE PARK 




Eleven room pristine home offering three levels of luxurious 
living space. Choose your master suite on either level. Three 
baths, 2 powder rooms. Huge lower level room for all 
reasons. Upper veranda entices you to sit and enjoy the view 
of the serene pond. Wrap-around estate landscaping. An ex T 
ecutive retreat in an idyllic setting. Hopewell Township with 
a Princeton address. $479,000 

HENDERSON- 

TES CLUB R P A 1 T( IDC^W BUS- 



any 

ESTATES CLUB 



REALTORS 



gJLQ. 



Rt. 31 & West Delaware, Pennington, N.J. 08534 
(609) 737-9100 




LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO 
PUT YOUR HORSES? 




Classic Colonial on 8 Hopewell Township acres with large living 
room, formal dining room, den, three bedrooms, two and a half 
baths, lovely kitchen with greenhouse room. Call Elaine Pilshaw 
at (609) 921-9300. $480,000 




Can you believe a lovely Dutch Colonial, circa 1820, with a barn 
and garage all maintained beautifully sited on 33 acres of land 
with sub-dividable possibilities? Move in condition. Belle Mead, 
Hillsborough Township. Outstanding opportunity. Please call 
Peggy Hughes at 609-921-9300 for details. $575,000 



JOH.NT 



^HENDERSON 



IK 



REALTORS 



33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 
(609) 921-9300 • (609) 924-5100 




ESTATES CLUB 



SUMMER RENTAL: PT. PLEASANT CARPENTRY, CABINETS, AND RE- 



BeachconrJo Furnished i -bedroom el- 
Uoency IV? blocks Irom beach Ex- 
cellent! value a! S750/month call 497- 
3226 (or oelals 



PAIR WORK done by an experienced 
craftsman. (609) 924-1474 4-16-tr 



EXPERT LANDSCAPE DESIGN 
COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL 



1966 MUSTANG FOR SALE: 
Cylinder, automatic S2500 or best of- Lawn & gardening service, pruning & 



fe* Call 924-1434 



FURNISHED 3-ROOM APARTMENT: 
one bedroom, living room, kitchen and 
bath. Centrally located in town 921- 



HOPEWELL BOROUGH: studio apart- 
' ment lor rent large walk-in closet, cable 
hook-up Available immediately $450 
. plus security 466-3516, 



tree removal, palios & walkways 
Snow removal 
Experienced in all phases. 
Call Larry G. Scanntll* 896-3193 

CARPENTRY • MASONRY 
Indoors - Outdoors 

You name rt. I can do most creative, 
decorative work or repair work 

Call Stava Hubar, 683-8616 



MOVING SALE 

Alter over 1 years in our present loca- 
lion we are relocating to a larger store 
to better serve your needs Thl* moans 
we mutt sail our currant Inventory 

Immediately. 

Everything in the store 
is reduced including: 

• Amimmumof 1 5% oH all standard of- 
fice supplies and furniture 

• Anadditional10%offallfloorsamples 
and safe items. 

• Calculators, Typewriters & Copiers - 
Take an additional 15% oft marked 
prices 

• Odds and ends at unbelievable 



I 






Fine China & Glass — Antiques — Office Furniture & Equipment 
Household Furnishings — Outstanding '85 Lincoln Torn to 

PUBLIC AUCTION 

Lawrence Road Fire Co, 1252 Lawrenceville Rd. (Rt. 2i)6) 

Between Lawrenceville and Trenton, NJ (South of 1 295) 

WED., APRIL 24 -8:30 A.M. 

Sold 12 noon: '85 Lincoln Town car, Signature Se- 
ries (4 door, power everything, keyless entry, es- 
tate car, 14,000 original miles). 
Sold 8:30 a.m.: Household & antiques; Vict, hall 
rack & marble top table; good office furnishings 
from Princeton (Bohren's) storage: fine desks, Ig. 
conference table & chairs, IBM typewrites, oak ta- 
ble, file cabinets, etc. Beautiful old Firefly & Lotus 
Tiffany-type lamp; rare Ig. pre-Columbian bronze 
kettle; K'ang Si vase & other oriental china. Fine 
Doulton vase & other fine china; cut & pressed 
glass; 12 oriental rugs; silver; Jewelry; 2 walnut 
stack book cases; etcl 

Lester & Robert Slatoff 

AUCTIONEERS 609-393-4848 
Trenton, NJ 215-736-8989 



Make Our Move Your Gain 

Action Business Supplies 
Montgomery Shopping Center 

Route 206, Rocky Hill, NJ. 
(809) 924-3454 

HAS YOUR KITCHEN FLOOR LOST 

its shine? We can restore your no-wax 
or vinyl floor to look like new. Just 
beaulifull Brilliant shine guaranleed lo 
last one lull year in writing. Wood floors 
expertly cleaned and polished loo. For 
free noobligation estimates, call Allstate 
Cleaning now al (609) 586-5633.9-20-tt 

WE BUY USED BOOKS: All subjects, 
but pay belter for literature, history, art, 
architecture, children's and philosophy. 
Good condition a must. Call Micawber 
Books, 110 Nassau Streel. Princeton 
921-8454 9-20-tf 






DAHLSTROM 
HOME IMPROVEMENTS 

Expert Craftsmanship 
Additions, Renovations. Kitchens, Baths 
Alt Home Repairs Local Refetences. 

FREE ESTIMATES 

609-882-0269 



Peyton 



PRINCETON 


— "CASTLE" 


AREA 


/ * *5ai 

al 




■ 
: 

^j3 


■J~^»aiaa»afraaaaWfi : i 




'^^W^P|P| 


i 



This Hunt & Augustine built house backs up to historic 
Castle Howard and faces Prospect Avenue. It is a 1 1 /2 
story design — the first floor having entrance, step-down 
living room with fireplace, panelled library with wet bar 
and fireplace, separate dining room with bow window, 
kitchen with breakfast area and adjoining greenhouse, 
master bedroom with full bath and powder room. Upstairs 
there are 3 family bedrooms and 2 full baths. 

The bonus is a separate apartment having its own en- 
trance with slate floor and skylight, living/dining room, 
woodburning stove and sliding glass doors to patio, kitch- 
enette, bedroom with full bath (also with skylight). There 
is a huge walk-in closet and connecting door to main part 
of house if you wish to use the apartment yourself. A 
marvelous house on a very pretty piece of property. It is 
something not be be missed at $590,000 



Peyton Associates 

Realtors 

Princeton Pennington 

609-737-9550 



609-921-1550 



OFFICE SPACE 

Heart of Princeton - Twenty Nassau Street 

. x,-.,,, a ii.viirv elevator building, elegant historical land- 

Rnaantlv eauipped & carpeted, reasonably priced. All utilities and dai y cleaning ser- 
Eleganny equippou o. ^o h . ft central air, private 



Broker cooperation 



Call 921-9574 or 924-7027 



r 




Ttr 



Gbria Nilson mm Realtors 

"Any size house & garden under the sun" 

Pete LaBriola, Manager 




PLAINSBORO 

This exceptionally well-maintained Hamilton II model in the 
Princeton Collection boasts 4 bedrooms, 2V 2 baths, family room 
with fireplace, a wooded back yard, and great schools with 
moderate-taxes. Call to see it today! $249,900 

Call 609-921-2600 
Gloria Nilson Realtors • 230 Nassau Street 
Princeton, N.J. 08542 




New Listing 

On a gentle hill on a winding road in Princeton's "Brookstone", 
this attractive Dutch Colonial awaits a new owner who loves 
the great outdoors. Two plus acres of beautiful grounds are 
enhanced by a sparkling pool and can be especially enjoyed 
from a ptcturesque portico and huge screened porch with a 
soaring beamed ceiling. The foyer opens to a front-to-back 
living room with fireplace, formal dining room, charming new 
kitchen with breakfast room, powder room and large family 
room with bay window. For guests or an au-pair, a first floor 
bedroom and bath. Upstairs - a spacious master bedroom with 
glamorous new bath, three family bedrooms and hall bath. 

$650,000 



SOTHEUVS 

INTERNATIONAL REALTY 



Four Nassau Street Princeton, New Jersey 08542 (609)921-1050 



NtCallawlr 

Real Estate Broker ^J Foi 



Four Nassau Street Princeton, New Jersey 08542 (609) 921-1050 




Princeton - Handsome weathered Colonial in Riverside 
with a great skylit room for family gatherings. $495,000 



Princeton - Classic Colonial overlooking Lake Carnegie. 
Four bedrooms, 2% baths, den and family room.$485,000 



Princeton - 4 bedroom Colonial with space for family and 
recreation. Family room overlooks pool. $655,000 




Princeton - Charming 3 bedroom, 2>/ 2 bath Colonial with Princeton - This handsome old Colonial on ten acres pro- 
large brick terrace overlooking free-form pool.$340,000 udly proclaims its 19th century heritage. $625,000 



Princeton - On a cul-de-sac, specimen trees shade this 
family-oriented four bedroom Colonial. $390,000 




- 


: V\ | 






[Iff 

fffffjim 






^^ 1 



Princeton - A country Tudor in Brookstone. Innovative 



dSMtt IS andUm ! =M«» with three bedrooms, 3 baths and loft/study. $480 



Princeton - In "Constitution Hill" - a luxurious townhouse Princeton - 4+ bedroom, 5 bath house enhanced by mar 



000 ble and mirrors in western Princeton. 



$747,000 





Hopewell - In Princeton Farms - four ^^J*™^ 
house with 2 fireplaces, eat-in kitchen and deck.$267,oou 

Building Sites 
Princeton 

Two acre wooded lot on Audubon Lane. $355,000 

Western Borough lot with choice of house by 
Baltzer. 

Montgomery 

Three wooded acres - Princeton address.$265,000 



Kingston - Attractive stucco house with two 2-bedroom 
apartments about 3 miles from Palmer Square.$220,000 



Montgomery - Spacious Cape with 3/4 bedrooms, 2 baths 
and versatile enclosed breezeway. NOW $199,000 



' on 2+ acres with 
$195,000 - $295,000 



Lawrence 

Four choice lots in "Landfall, 
public utilities. 
Four plus acre homesite in estate area overlook- 
ing Stony Brook. $425,000 
Four-acre wooded lot in "Rosedale" - Princeton 
address. $195,000 



Hopewell 

Ten+ acres of high rolling land. 



Exclusive Affiliate 



$295,000 



SOTHEBYS 

INTERNATIONAL REALTY 



Prime Corner Property 
For Sale 

3 Bedroom Cape on Busy Rte. 571 
Zoned Professional Office 
In West Windsor Township 

Call (609) 683-0243 for 

further information 



EXPERIENCED GARDENER will lake 
care ol your lawn and snrubs All types 
of garden work Spring cleanups. Call 
lor Iree estimate. 609-883-2e30.3-6-7l 



FREE ■ FREE - FREE ■ FREE. 

Pool removal. Will take down and 
remove any aluminum pool tree Call 
908281-7056 3-20-51 



JULIUS H. GROSS, inc. 

Professional Interior & Exterior 

Painting & Paperhanging 

A Princeton Business 
for Over 30 years 
Owner Operated 

Call 924-1474 

for a Free Estimate 

and Prompt Service 

Professional Painting Payel ... In many ways, 



Mfl 



MORTON A DEFOREST Custom Build- 
ing & Remodelling. Additions, renova- 
tions, krtchens. baths, finished carpen- 
try, home repairs. 18 years experience 
Many references Quality work. 609- 
799-9089 3-27-41 

LAWN MOWING: Planting, hedge prun- 
ing, large and small lawns. Ten years 
experience. Princeton references. 
Reasonable rates Call Stephen, 443- 
5470 after 6 p.m. 3-27-41 



APARTMENT FOR RENT: Kitchen, di- 
nette, bedroom, living room. Two park- 
ing spaces. Business couple No pets, 
no children, no smoking. $750 a month 
plus utilities. Call between 4 and 8, 924- 
4093 3-27-41 



BILL'S HOUSE PAINTING: Clean; 

quality work. Free estimates Fully in- 
sured. Inferior and exterior. References 
available. Call 443-8959. 4-10-tl 



NEW OWNER 

Clayton Keeler Professional Engineer 



CONSTRUCTION 

Call 921-1184 

ADDITIONS and RENOVATIONS 



ANXIOUS? DEPRESSED? PANICKY? 

Research medication study available at 
Princeton Biomedical Research PA.. 
across from the Princeton Shopping 
Center. Participants with anxiety or 
depression or panic disorders will re- 
ceive free doclor appointments, lab 
tests, evaluations and medications. 921- 
6050. 4-10-tf 

CANCER SUPPORT tor patients and 
families sponsored by the Medical Cen- 
ter at Princeton. For information on 
groups and individual counseling; Mary 
Levenstem 683-0692. 6-20-rf 



TONY'S LAWN SERVICE 

Spring Cleaning, Grass Cutting 

Trimming and Weed Pulling 

Call 497-9233 

3-27-4t 




ONE OF THE SPECIAL ONES 


■ft N J I 






■; J jlfeu— '^X\ — JstM^fW 




ijJH 


^ri ■■I'll' 

{Ml . SEfiaaaahl ■■■ | 




Ep 


1 


* 





EVERY NOW AND THEN one of those houses you al- 
ways admired really comes on the market. Here is a 
stone and frame Vh story outstandingly located in 
Princeton Township within walking distance of schools, 
shopping and town center. It has entrance hall, front- 
to-back living room with stone fireplace, dining room with 
corner cabinet, nice up-to-date kitchen with breakfast 
area and powder room on first floor. Upstairs there are 3 
bedrooms and a bath redone in 1989. There is full base- 
ment, patio, garage building, central air and lots of special 
features. Call us today if "something special" is what you 
are looking for. Offered for $289,500 



Princeton 



Peyton Associates 

Realtors 



609-921-1550 



Pennington 

609-737-9550 



I PAXJL± 



(609) 683-0 0*0 



I 



=r ■ 



Now 

Located at 

Ellsworth 

Center 

799-4496 

33 Prixdon-HifthHlowi Bd, Prirmton Jet 




SKILLMAN FURNITURE 

Used furniture, chests, dressers, 
unfinished bookcases, etc. 

SPECIALS OF THE WEEK: 

A pair of matching love seats; 
J And a gate-leg drop-leaf table. 

I 212 Alexander St., Princeton 

■ Mon-Fri 9-5, Sat 9-1 924" 1 88 1 



I 
I 



W 



CROSSROADS 




SUMMER, FALL, WINTER, SPRING 

realtor En J ov tne comforts and convenience of 

this stately Princeton Colonial 

Enter into a spacious foyer with curved staircase. Walk through the ' 
living room, dining room and wonderful eat-in kitchen. For relaxa- 
tion there is an enormous family room, sun room, study/fifth bedroom 
and two decks. There is more upstairs and downstairs! This gracious 
home is located in a prime Riverside location. Come see it!$599,000 

Princeton Crossroads Realty, Inc. 

609-924-4677 

342 Nassau Street (Corner Harrison) • Princeton • Park in our lot 









N.tCallawaf 

Real Estate Broker^/ 




New Listing 

So near — you can enjoy the cultural and athletic events in 
Princeton. So far — it has the ambiance of the countryside. 
This quiet loop road just north of Princeton in Montgomery has 
the privacy of a cul-de-sac with the advantage of two outlets. 
The soft cream color of this attractive Colonial, with its shut- 
ters of sky blue, makes a pretty picture in its setting of green 
grass and flowering landscaping. The inviting foyer opens to a 
gracious living room, formal dining room, eat-in kitchen, pow- 
der room, panelled family room with fireplace and access to a 
sunny deck and large flagstone terrace. Upstairs — a spacious 
master bedroom with bath, three bedrooms and hall bath. A 
delightful family-oriented house in a family-oriented neighbor- 
hood - $315,000 



SOTHEBY'S 

ICTERNAIfONAL DEALT? 



Four Nassau Street Princeton, New Jersey 08542 (609)921-1050 



oCHIXJTT REALTORS* 




PRINCETON 

OPEN HOUSE SUN. 1-4 

58 Leigh Ave. 

Be pleasantly surprised at this in-town 3 B/R, 2 bath expand- 
ed single home w/lofts, skylights, deck & garden. Also for rent 
at $1100/month. Directions: Witherspoon St. to Leigh, left 
side of street. $149,000. PRN488. 



PRINCETON 

OPEN HOUSE SUN. 12-5 

Griggs Farm 

Don't miss these 2 & 3 B/R townhouses. WAV carpeting, A/C, 
tennis courts, Princeton schools. Unbeatable values! Direc- 
tions: Rt. 206 to Hillside to Cherry Valley Rd. follow signs. 
Starting at $99,500. PRN481. 




PRINCETON 

European style 3 B/R townhouse offers privacy & space. In- 
town living at its best. Lovely private garden and 2 car at- 
tached garage. Directions: Moore to Chestnut to Walnut to 
Houghton by high school to Richard. $349,500. PRN1002. 



PRINCETON BOROUGH 

Lovingly renewed and cared for colonial on well landscaped 
lot. All new roof and mechanical systems. New appliances. 
$269,000. PRN636. 



PRINCETON 

10 Nassau Street 

921-1411 



COLDUieU. 
BANKeRQ 



SCHLOTT 

REALTORS* 



Da 




Firestone Weal Estate 



HI 



169 Nassau Street, Princeton 



»i Klirtiiiii 



Anne Adriance 
Elizabeth Bonasera 
Anne Brown 
Pat Cullen 



James W. Firestone, 

Broker 
Gail Firestone 




A MAGNIFICENT WESTERN PRINCETON WILLIAMSBURG COLONIAL set 

on 2.33 acres of woodland with beautiful mature landscaping. Inside is a warm 
slate entry foyer with a front-to-back sunken living room with fireplace. The fami- 
ly room also has a fireplace and built-in bookcases with a French door to the 
flagstone patio. The formal dining room is accented with grasscloth and is con- 
venient to the recently expanded eat-in-kitchen which has top-of-the-line ap- 
pliances and a great breakfast area. Upstairs, are four ample bedrooms including 
a step-down master suite plus room for expansion of another suite above the 
garage It's a real find in this market, a house with character and priced to sell. 

(649,000 




WEST WINDSOR FARM IN HORSE COUNTRY. This 74 acre farm is some of 
the best agricultural land in the county. High and mostly dry, it has beautiful 
views in every direction. The wonderful home has many Early American touches 
plus spacious rooms and a maturely wooded site. Available with an extra building 
site backing up to a lovely stream for... $1,500,000 




PRINCETON SEMI ALMOST IN THE UNIVERSITY. This clapboard Victorian 
charmer has been restored to the condition of yesteryear even down to the 
clawfoot tub, wainscotting & brass fixtures in the bath. Both living room and 
master bedroom have a bay and there's even a Serpentine wall in the hallway. 
Original fine natural wood moldings and charm in this 3 bedroom, slate roof 
townhome. $219,000 







SB 


■ * 


— „ — - — ~j^m 

1 




I 




i 


1^ 


lift 1 

I 


if 




4, 


l \J I 



Joan Frank 
Ginger Lennon 
Judy Matthias 
Donna Relchard 



(609) 924-2222 

Doug Rhinehart 
Robin Smith 
Lee Spellman 
Ava Yunko 




NEW PRINCETON LISTING — EXQUISITE FRENCH PROVINCIAL. Set on 
a lovely two-plus acre setting on one of Princeton's most desirable streets, this 
exciting new Firestone offering features an impressive slate entry foyer, richly 
detailed rooms for entertaining, and European elegance throughout its impressive 
4400+ square foot size. You'll enjoy romantic moods in the attractive master 
suite on the second floor, and lazy summer afternoons on the bluestone terrace 
next to the pool and very special brick poolhouse. 5 bedrooms, 3+ baths, 2 
fireplaces, and a 3-car garage for your antique sports cars are just a few of the 
special features of this unique offering. If you are someone who expects the best, 
do call for further information and a personal inspection. $950,000 




AUTHENTIC EARLY AMERICAN COLONIAL farm house near Princeton on 
52 rolling acres. Was a holly tree farm. The house sits way back from the road 
in a beautiful hilltop clearing. Inside is a magnificent center hall, 2 living rooms, 
a spacious dining room and a wonderful country kitchen. Upstairs, the 5-6 
bedrooms are spacious. Well laid out with beautiful wide pine floorboards. A great 
country place in Franklin Township with a Princeton mailing address. $880,000 

5*2 55^5 




A EUROPEAN TWO-STORY HOME IN PRINCETON. What's the difference bet- 
ween European construction and American. Some say when a European builds 
his home, he builds it to last. And that's what we have here, an all brick home 
with massive stone fireplace in the living room, an expansive dining room, and 
eat-in kitchen with large central island and a den besides. There are 4 bedrooms 
in all, and beautiful views framed by architect-inspired windows. Come see quality 
in a friendly Princeton neighborhood. $329,000 



PRINCETON APARTMENT HOUSE — 5 units in all in lovely location, overlooks 
Choir College. Good rental units, all like pied-a-terres in Paris. Great for 5 
students, or 5 older couples. Come see. $339,000 

Princeton Real Estate Group 

HELSSEKtfff' ALL AR EA LISTINGS 




NEW COLONIAL IN PRINCETON. This lovely two story colonial is about to be 
built just a mile from Palmer Square. Four bedrooms in all include a master 
suite. And yes, there is a fireplace in the family room. $400,000 

National Roster of Realtors 

Referral Member 
American Relocation Council 



SHARE 3-BEDROOM carriage house in 
quiet, beautiful setting Kitchen. Ii v - 
mg/dinmg room, two balhs. AC, hard- 
wood doors, buift-in bookshelves. $325 
a month plus VS utilities. Available May 
1. 683-4255 after 7 p.m 4-17-21 

HOUSE CLEANING AVAILABLE: Ex- 
cellent references, experience, own 
iransportation Call 394-3553 or 215- 
788-0865. 4-17-21 

HONEST HOUSECLEANER looking lor 
work m Princeton/La wrenceville area. 
Own transportation, good references. 
Call anytime, 609-394-3686. 4-17-21 



RENTALS 

FURNISHED OR UNFURNISHED 

PRINCETON: Studio apt. - large room 

FURNISHED SUMMER RENTALS 

PRINCETON: Elegantly furnished 2- 

bedroom, i-bath apartment, ,errace 
Parking, and close to Palmer Square' 
Avail. June 5th to Sep,, sth. $1300. 

* 1952 JAGUAR XJ-120: replica buill in £"' M £ E ™ N " WEST ERN SECTION: 

1988 on Ford chassis and engine. Mint ■_ , ea nous e. 3 berooms. 2 baths 

«,nrtrllon. $14,500 O.B.O. Call 520- L° f y seTtin 9 Avail. July and Auqust 

.,„„: a .-, ~. $1300 oer mnnth s 



8 on i-oracnassis ana engine. Mint ■ , — •"=-• *■ 

condilion. $14,500 O.B.O. Call 520- L^ 86 "'" 9 Avai 
0500. or 497-1010 evenings. 4-17-2t per mon, h 

APARTMENT TO RENT, KINGSTON: 

Two bedrooms, 1 Vz baths, unfurnished. 
, Large living room and kitchen. Small 
deck. Access to pool and tennis courts. 
Rent $780/month. Available early June, 
Call 924-5376 for appointment.4-17-2t 

BORDENTOWN AREA: Get more for 

your money in this historic area just one- 
hall hour south of Princeton. Newly 
renovated apartment with two bed- 
rooms, eat-in kitchen, large living room 
1 and bathroom on second and third floor 
ol landlord's house. No smokers, no 
pets. Professional couple preferred. 
Heat and hot water included. $725. Call 
291-0282. 4-17-21 

FOR SALE: '91 MITSUBISHI Eclipse 
Alpine stereo, equalizer, amplifier. Car 
phone. 7.000 highway miles. Call 201 - 
329-2436, leave message. (Moving to 
St. Thomas.) 4-17-31 



UNFURNISHED 



PRINCETON: Victorian. 3 bedrooms 
one -SYid one-hall balhs, Liv, Din Kit- 
chen. Close to town. Avail, immediate- 
ly. $1250 per month 

We have many other summer rentals 
Please call us. 

STOCKTON REAL ESTATE 

32 Chambers Street 

Princeton, N.J. 08540 

924-1416 

Anne S. Stockton, Licensed Broker 



Mattress Factory Outlet 

Innerspring, foam and lalex 
30x74 - 48x74 - 60x80 
33x74 — 53x74 — 78x80 



Sofabed mattresses 
Odd sizes available 



APARTMENT FOR RENT: Princeton 

Borough. Spruce Street. One bedroom. 

living room, eat-in kitchen, bath, newly 

renovated, sunny. Walk to Nassau Free delivery — Old bedding removed 

Street and stores. Modernized to latest 

code, intercom apartment building, Sealy Posturepedic 

$795 per month, heat and parking in- Springwall Chiropractic 

eluded. Available now. Call 921-9574, Simmons Beauly Rest 

4-17-3t 
— '■ Foam cut to any size 



CARDONA LANDSCAPING SERVICE 

Professional Landscaping 

and Lawn Service 

Customized Commercial 

and Residential Service 

Free Consultations. Call Anytime. 

609-452-9354 



Phone: 298-0910 

Mon., Weds., Fri., 9-5:30 

Tues., Thurs., 9-8 

Saturday. 9-5 

CAPITAL BEDDING COMPANY 
U.S. Highway 130 
3-:3-i 3i Bet. Yardville and Bordentown 




FIE A L 

ESTATE 



KM- 

LIGHT 

247 Nassau St., Princeton • 609-924-3822 




18 MARION ROAD WEST 

In Princeton's Shady Brook. Dogwood trees, pret- 
tily landscaped V2 acre, quiet street in attractive 
family area. 4 bedrooms, 3 baths, all-weather 
enclosed porch. Fireplace and hardwood floors. 

$245,000 




GREAT VALUE 

Excellent house and in an estate area of Lawrence 
Township. Quality new construction. Many added 
extra features. 2Vs acres. Ready for Spring Oc- 
cupancy. $750,000 



Karl Light, Broker 



m 

REALTOR 




JAMES IRISH TREE EXPERTS 

tree • shrub • hedge maintenance 

pruning • topping * shaping 
fertilizing • tree & stump removal 

retioential • commercial ___ _ 

fully insured 924-3470 



f 



924-4322 




Appraisals by R. Harris Block 

Silver, Jewelry, Antiques & Home 
'|l Furnishings for Insurance, Fire & Estate Purposes 
|J This is the time for profitable Tag Sales! 
n Appraise your valuables before vacation time. 

* Int'lSoc afAppr. • Appn. Auoc of Amcr. 



NEW OWNER 

Clayton Keeler Professional Engineer 

Williamson 
ROOFING 

Call 921-1184] 

Free Estimates 
NEW ROOFS • REPAIRS • ALL TYPES 



PREVIEW OPENING APRIL 2< 



You Can't Keep A Good Thing 

HIDDEN 

For Long. 




Especially when it's the most revolutionary 
new home design to ever hit the Princeton area! 



We call it "Freestyle." And with 
good reason. Hidden Hill offers you a 
freedom of style not found anywhere 
else in the Princeton area. But it's 
more than just a design. It's an atti- 
tude ... a lifestyle perfect for anyone 
who has ever dared to be different. 
Come see what it's all about and pre- 
view plans for this magnificent new 
estate home community. 
FREESTYLE ESTATE HOMES FROM $575,000 

{m\\mVfSk Dickson Development Corporation 

' l^M^m^^m^^^M A Troailion of tnnovOftve QvaMv Construction 




mm 

LL 



(609) 921-3671 

Sales Center Hours: Daily 11-5 

NJ Turnpike tp Exil 9. Follow signs to 1(1 I S. Rt 1 S 
approx. 15 mile- to Washington Rd. Turn right on 
Washington R<l (following signs for Princeton). Turn 
left at 3rd light onto Nassau St. Follow Nassau St. to 
Rt 206 S. Take Rt 206 S for 2.7 miles to Province 
Line Rd and turn left. Hidden Hill sales center is 
'/i mile on left. 



SIMPLY SANTA FE: Lovely assortment '79 VW RABBIT tor sale for $800 One RENT ON MOORE STREET: (1) Twc- 



ol Southwest items (torn Santa Fe so- owner, good condition, regularly serv>c- 
joum Painted cupboard, table. Zapo- ed. only 87.000 miles. Call 924-7362 

tec pottery. Kachina dolls, bear fetishes, 

baskets, serapes, kiva ladders, tur- CLEAN SOIL AVAILABLE FREE: 
quoise jewelry, old and new Mexican Come and get it 34 Mercer Street (609- 
pottery, medicine shield, Ule arrows. 497-9448) 
posters, more Two days only, Apnl 19 

Cat 52CK)259 2 *'"*'' * T ° WPa ' h ^^ F0R SM£: ™<>* EDE & r *L Mahofl- 



any dining room table 44' x64Vi" with 
5 " two 18" leaves. Wool ruo 12' x 25' 

O WANTED: MUSICAL PERCUSSION Single bed. complete Library char. 
uj instruments — drums, cymbals, Chinese screen. Copper planters. 

3* xylophones, and other accessories, lamps, loudspeakers, display shelves 
924-6311 Appointment only, 924-5777. 

J FOR SALE: KAVPRO 2000 laptop FLYING TO MARTHAS VINEYARD? 

2j computer with base unit IBM compati- Seeking weekend flights in June and 

. ble and 768 RAM. 3Vt and SW drives July (torn Mercer, Princeton or Teter- 

X LCD screen (23 lines x 80 characters), boro airports, will share cost of charter 

p Onboard swrtchable modem (300/ Call 609-924-6481 

uj 1200) Rechargeable 8-12 hr. battery 

S pack Detachable keyboard wrth carry- pBiurPTnu muraainc idea. „„„ 



Metis 



Available May 1. Call 921-6181. 



g PRIVATE ROOM: House share, avail ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS ol 

z able June 1st to September 1st with Pf'^ceton. For immediale help with a 

» posable option lor following 'year drinking problem, call (609) 393-8010. 

O $300/month plus utilities Quiet Fof "Homiatton. write Princeton P.O. 

•- nonsmoker a must. No pets. Beautiful Box 538 Mee, ' n 9 s every night in pmNC ETON 

home in Princeton Call 921-8671 form- p ' in celon or surrounding area. I! 

lerview 



room furnished efficiency, heat, 
kitchenette, refrigerator, bath, water, 
parking Single occupancy Pay elec- 
tricity plus $625/month Long-term 
lease only. Available Mayl (2) Two- 
room furnished basement efficiency, 
kitchenette, refrigerator, bath, water, 
heat, electricity Single occupancy. Pay 
$600/month. negotiable lor house or 
lawn help. Long-term lease only 
Available in July. (3) Two large 
bedrooms upstairs with bath and 
shower rooms and soft water Living 
room with fireplace, dining room, porch, 
modern kitchen, refrigerator, dish- 
washer, freezer. Utility room with 
washer and dryer. Heated garage, 
large landscaped yard Heat and water 
free. Rent $1450/mo Long term lease 
only. Available on July 15. Call 
924-2157 4-10-61 

CHEAP: FBI/U.S.-SEIZED: 84 VW. 
$50; 87 Mercedes, $200; '85 
Mercedes, $100; 65 Mustang, $50. 
Choose from thousands starting $25, 
FREE 24-Hour Recording Reveals 
Details 801-379-2929 Copyright iV 
ZJ121C U.S. HOTLINE copyright. 

4-10-81 



ROOFING: All types ol roots (new or 



Spacious, newly 
renovated, excellent location in 

downtown Pnncelon Two bedrooms, 
large living and dining room, beautiful 



FOR RENT: Unfurnished two-room jepairs), leaders, gutters, chimney kitchen and bath, $1,150 month plus 

kitchenette and bathroom apartment llasnir, 9 Skylights repaired. Fast ser- umes ^ 7 . B7 ^ 7 4 . 17 . 3 , 

Central, private Suitable for single or vlce Wofk guaranteed. Over 40 years __ 

couple. Inquire 22 Charlton Street ,n bus,ness 8 e»e Mead Roofing. Local 

call from Princeton 908-359-5992. H 



OAK ROLLTOP DESK: Drop leaf 
tables, farm tables, marble lop 
sideboard, table — six chairs, pie safe, 



FOR SALE OR RENT BY OWNER: Tri- W|ND0WS . ST0RM W|ND0WS . |n 

level contemporary lownhouse ^ WINDOWS ftSTOHM WINDOWS. In- _ 

wooded Pnnceton Township cul-de-sac 90e s oul $fa - 00 each window Carpet, 50,3 Iab | e] breaMroni. end tables, more. 

ot a dozen homes, 5 minutes Irom "P nols,ef V. wall, panel and bathroom. Aunt SaNie . s Barn 43 Main Slfeet 

shopping 1 .5 miles from Nassau Street. Com P ,e,e nome cleaning Fully insured. Kingston, N.J. Open Saturday-Sunday, 

End unit, attached 2-car garage, full A " work flwa"'"**- 3 93-2122 If 11 _5 p.m. 609-924-9502. 4-3-41 

basement, lireptace, hardwood floors. 

30' x 10' very pnvale deck, 19' x 11' 

loft/study, alcove/silting area, 2 

carpeted bedrooms. 2Vs balhs. 19' x 

23' great room/living room, dining ■ 

room, kitchen, laundry room $1,875 FILING CABINETS: Come see our met 

rent; $267,500 sell 609-924-2492, al filing cabinels lor office or home. 



LAMP SHADES: Lamp mounting and SEHV |CES AVAILABLE: Nurse's Aide. 



lamp repairs, Nassau Interiors. 162 
Nassau Street. 6-1 -if 



1 7-21 Grey, Ian, olive, 2 or 4 drawer Also typ- 
ing tables. Hinkson's, 82 Nassau Slreet. 



MOVING SALE: Eames chairs, Russell 

Wright china, evening and day clothes. 

books, hardware, and much more. 247 PIANO TUNER-TECHNICIAN 

Elm Road. Princeton. April 27 and 28. Precision ear lunmg 20 years, Repair, 
9 30 to 4 p m 4-17-21 reasonable renovation; courteous ser- 

vice. Excellent relerences on request. 

VOU CAN FIND what you need in Paul Lenilnl (609)924-6919 

TOWN TOPICS. 7 . ]]|( 



Home Health Aide, live-in. LPN, RN. 
Reliable. Please call 609-989-8964 or 
609-392-1579. 4-3-4t 

FOR RENT 3V* MONTHS: 4 bedroom, 
2 bath house, beaulilul Princeton loca- 
tion. Call lor details. 924-5960. 

4-3-41 

COSTA RICA Beach Villa for rent — 
minutes Irom unspoiled surfing, sun- 
bathing, sport fishing — pool, satellite 
TV, staff car, 3 bedrooms and balhs, 
spectacular setting. (20t) 647-3885.4- 
3-4t 



f 



Pl'ljfOI! 






"ROBINWOOD FARM"...located in Hopewell Township, 
between Princeton and Pennington , this 31 -acre estate, 
with its beautiful ponds, borders picturesque Stony Brook. 
The main house, dating back to 1760, with many addi- 
tions and changes over the years, has a warmth and 
charm that is undeniable. The double living room, two- 
story library, dining room with vast expanses of windows, 
5 fireplaces and carved panelled upstairs study are but a 
few of the special features. There are 4 or 5 bedrooms, 
ample living area plus separate building with office, guest 
house and two tenant houses. A garage and barn com- 
plete this very lovely picture $1 ,750,000 

Peyton Associates 

Realtors 
Princeton Pennington 

609-921-1550 609-737-9550 



FULLER BRUSHES 

BEN D. MARUCA 

175 Redwood Ave. 

Tel. 888-1254 
Trenton, N.J. 08610 



C Micawber Books J 

(T new, used and rare 

rT 110 Nassau Street 

> Princeton, New Jersey 

(L (609) 921-8454 



THE CLOSET DOCTOR 

WE SPECIALIZE 
IN CLOSETS 
(609)443-8202 
(800)344-4537 
(609)654-1786 





Unsurpassed Elegance in HopewellTownship 



Elegance abounds in 
these magnificent two- 
and three-story estate 
homes at Carriage Place. 
From breathtaking, two- 
story foyers to luxurious 
master suites with private 
sitting rooms and secluded 
balconies, these homes 
offer uncompromising 
quality and style. 




From $469,900 



And, as one of only 12 
gracious estates at 
Carriage Place, you'll be 
surrounded by the time- 
less beauty of prestigious 
Hopewell Township, yet 
remarkably convenient to 
Princeton, New York and 
Philadelphia. 



For more information and a brochure, call (609) 737-0516. 
Open Tues., Sat., Sun. 12-5 pm or by appointment. 



»DeLUCA ENTERPRISES, INC. t& tm h 



Drrwtioris; Use 1-95 lo Exit 3 (Scotch Rif. North) Co approximately 2 miles until Scotch Rd, becomes Burd Rd 
intrnue on Burd Rd. for another V, mile. Carriage Place is on your right. 



I 



Rosemary Blair 
Ann Harwood 
Winifred Hull 
Amanda Blair Nichols 
Melanle Perone 
Karl Perm 



-|-0 <= K.-T O KJ 

REAL ESTATE 

32 CHAMBERS STREET 

P.O. BOX 266 

PRINCETON, N.J. 08540 

609-924-1416 

Anne Stockton 

Licensed Broker 



SALES LISTINGS 



Cornelia W. Reader 
Martha Stockton 
Clotilda S. Treves 
Franklin Wang 
Polly Woodbrldge 



**S«BP 






PRINCETON - WESTERN SECTION - Unique and interesting pro- 
perty — Come and see the many possibilities. $299,000 
PRINCETON - WESTERN SECTION - Beautiful landscaping and ter- 
race set off this attractive spacious brick house on a corner lot conve- 
nient to town. 3 bedrooms, 2'/ 2 baths, living room with fireplace, dining 
room, and kitchen, central air, 2 car garage. $345,000 
PRINCETON - WESTERN SECTION - Custom designed contem- 
porary surrounded by 1.43 acres built with luxury and privacy in mind. 
Ihree bedrooms and three full baths. $649,000 
™S™ -Contemporary ranch on a beautifully landscaped'cor- 

fireolacJ 1 1° bedr °° mS ' ™ ba,hs and a wonde ^ study with 
fireplace. 2 car garage. $221,000 

h^^'t^T.^^^.^ accura,e 1840 Colonial on q ui et street. Three 
bedrooms, 2 baths. Lovely grounds. Lots of possibilities. $159,000 

fTwtrhfn'V Why fent When you could own? 0ne bedroom, one bath, 
full kitchen, living room. Pool and tennis privileges. ONLY $69,999 

PR "! C !I°! 1 ~ WeStern Borou9h - Quiel neighborhood. Contemporary 
[fwhli h edroomS : f ba,ns ' s P aoious and bright LR, DR. Wide halls make 
it wheelchair suitable. $250,000 

Seeour current Rental List In classified section. 




IT'S GETTING LIKE THE GOOD OLD DAYS' 
JU^TUSTED THIS WEEK! 




11 LOVERS LANE 

PRINCETON 

$625,000 

Call Ellen Clarke 





12 OAK PLACE 
LAWRENCEVILLE 

$449,500 
Call your favorite Henderson agent 



57 COLFAX ROAD 

MONTGOMERY 

$685,000 

Call Peggy Henderson 




49 LARSEN ROAD 

EAST AMWELL 

$400,000 

Call Lois Tegarden 







Hi H 9 MP 

W M 




106 BALCORT DRIVE 
PRINCETON 

$650,000 
Call Peggy Henderson 



30 BAKER COURT 
PRINCETON 

$295,000 
Call Miriam Bell 




71 ELM RIDGE ROAD 

HOPEWELL 

$595,000 

Call Gilda Aronovic 



JO HN I ,„»,o, 3 

CHENDER§ON B 



__ ** __ 
ESTATES CLUB 

□ PBOPERtT. 



REALTORS 



33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 
(609) 921-9300 



§J Princeton: Studio in Palmer Square. 
*• heal & water included $650 



IN-HOME PET CARE: Don't board your 
pets, keep them in your home Ex- 
perienced pel watcher Call 609-921- 
6581 Bonded 4-10-41 



^ PrincMon:STudK) in Palmer Square, lur- NEED HELP? Try Youth employment 

J S850 ^v>ce Teenagers do indoor and out- 

C door work after school and on week- 

5 __, „ ends Call 924-5841 for a worker 

* Princeton: 2 bedroom, i bath apt m 4-10-4t 

> Palmer Square $1200 



« Princoton: Spaoous 1 bedroom apt on 
jr N. Harnson AJI appliances. Air condition- 
er ed Parking Av. 5/1 $950 

Princeton: 1 bedroom apt on Wither* 
-» spoon St near Nassau St Parking 
Z $850 

O Princeton: 1 bedroom garage apart- 

JjJ menl on Lawrenceville Road $600 
U 

jp Princeton: 4 bedroom. 2«? bath lowo 

5 house in Queenston Commons. Av 6/1 

- $1800 

s 

0. Princeton: In Russell Estales Colonial 
O W ith 4 bedrooms, 314 balhs, $3500 

£ Princeton: 2 bedroom, l balh furnish- 
er ed Colonial. Av 7/1/91-6/30/92. No pets. 
*~ $1000 

Lawrenceville: 4 bedroom, 2V? bath 
Cape with pool Av 6/1 $2000 

Lawrenceville: Cosy 3 bedroom, 2 bath 

Cape near Rider College. Avail. 5-1. 

$1100 

' Lawrenceville: 4 bedroom. 2V2 -balh 
Colonial in Woodlane Eslates No pels 
$1750 

Montgomery: Charming renovated 
barn wilh 3 bedrooms, 2 1 /? baths, dor- 
mitory loft. $2400 

Princeton Green: 2 bedroom, 2 bath 
townhouse. No pets. $1300 



LAWN MOWING: Princeton Lawrence 
ville area. Cleanups, edging, trimming 
For tree estimate call J&T Lawn Main- 
tenance at 896-1420 or 392-4083 

4-10-41 

UNUSUAL 3/4 BEDROOM HOUSE for 

rent On 10 acres 10 minutes north of 
Princeton. Fireplace, exposed beams. 
low ceilings $100 discount for early 
paymenl $1060 609-921-3867 

4-1041 

ROOM FOR RENT: In large private 
house Quiet 27 Madison Street 4 
minules from Nassau $310 plus 
utilities 683-9159 4-10-41 

GARAGE SPACES: ten minutes north 

ol Princeton, near 518 and 601 For 
storage only 14'/-- and 20 by 20, dis- 
counted to $80/month and $1 10/month. 
609-9213867 4 10-4! 



EXPERIENCED GARDENER: Total 
lawn care and spring cleanup Call 609- 
883 5263 afler 5 p.m. 4 10-41 



LIVERV SERVICE: Affiliated with 
Grover Taxi. Informal, quality service to 
airports. Please call 48 hours in ad- 
vance, 275-1050. Reasonable rates 
4-10-41 



MASONRY WORK 

Quality work at affordable prices 

Any type ol masonry work 
For a free estimate call John al: 



Canal Point: 2 bedroom, 1 bath "Ar- 
bor" Avail June 1 $825 

N.T. CALLAWAY 

Real Estate 
4 Nassau Street 
609-921-1646 



D.L.N. BUILDER 

New consl ructions, remodeling and 
repairs (bathroom, kitchen, etc.). decks. 
patios, porches, additions Fast service 
Work guaranteed. (609) 924-2684 



PAVING AND LANDSCAPING 
CONTRACTOR 

COMMERCIAL AND RESIDENTIAL 

New & Resurfacing - Seal Coating 

Crushed Stone - Tar & Chips 

Drainage Work - Septic Systems 

Patios - Sod 

FELIX V. PIRONE 
Call 609-924-1735 

Free Estimates tf 



APARTMENTS 



One month free rent to qualified 

individuals at select complexes 

if leases are signed by May 15, 1991 



PRINCETON 
ARMS 



KENSINGTON ARMS 

DORCHESTER ARMS 

CHESTNUT WILLOW 

448-4801 

EAST WINDSOR 

Conveniently located near Route 

130 & Route 1 just off Rt. 571 

• Individually controlled heat 
included in rent 

• Air conditioning 

» Individual balconies 

• Storage room in apt. 

• Wall to wall carpets 



PRINCETON 
COURT 



KLOCKNER WOODS 

CRESTWOOD SQUARE 

586-5108 

586-1253 

HAMILTON 

Located on Klockner Road and 

Whitehorse-Mercerville Rd. 

• Close to shopping 

• Beautifully landscaped 
grounds 

• Superintendent on site 



NASSAU 
ARMS 

921-7617 
PRINCETON 

Located in Princeton Borough- 
Walk to Princelon Shopping f 
Center, on the Bus Line. 

• Heat included 

• 2-story garden apt. 

• Beautiful landscaping 

• In-town living 



TOWNHOUSE 
GARDENS 

448-2198 

HIGHTSTOWN 

BOROUGH 

Just off the N.J. Turnpike in 
Hightstown. 

• Some units with 1st and 2nd 
floors (Townhouses) 

• Easy commuting via 
N.J. Turnpike 

• Near Route 130 

• Convenient to shopping 



MADISON 
ARMS 

201-782-2909 

FLEMINGTON 

BOROUGH 

• Just off Route 31 & 202 

• Close to shopping 

• Two story Garden Apts. 

• Superintendent on site 



ECHO 
ROOFING 

BEST PRICE m 

BEST QUALITY - 

Call for FREE estimate: 
609-921-3721 



MICHAEL L. ROSENTHAL. M.S.W., ED.D. 

Personal Problem, Career and EducaHonal Counseling 
Individuals and Small Groups 

3 Valerie Lane <609) 896-4446 

Lawrenceville, New Jersey By Appointment 



PRINCETON 
NOW JUST $99,500. 




/MADE BY HAND 



AMERICAN CRAFTED JEWELRY 
POTTERY, RUGS, BASKETS, ETC. 



WE'RE STILL HERE • 
with Hew Hour* Tnurs. & Frl. 1030am to 5:30pm 
S at. 11:0Oam to 3:00pm _, 

MILL HILL HISTORIC DISTRICT 

360 S. Broad Street, Trenton 

609-392-5016 

Offering the Works of More Than 
80 ARTISTS from 17 STATES ^ 

Betty Holland.Propneto r _ 




Call (609) 683-7555. ModeU open 
1 2 - 5 Wea - Sun, or bvappotntment- 
From Princeton Center (Nassau SL), take 
Route 206 N. 3 miles to Griggs Firm. 
Turn left on Cneny Valley Ri (u llghO 
and proceed 1/4 mile to entrance ooleft 



Princeton school system 

Tennis courts • walking paths 

26-acre community 

Excellent financing available 

2-bctL townhomes... 

$99,500 

3-bed. townhomes... 

$109,500 



[o^ vassal 

Pnc tf subject to change without notice . 



Adlerman, Click & Co., Inc. 

For All Area Listings 
Realtors and Insurers 
(609) 924-0401 • 15 Spring St., Princeton, N.J. • (609) 586-1020 
IT'S A PRINCETON CLASSIC! 




CREATE YOUR OWN "CAMELOT" — MAKE OUR 
CASTLE YOUR HOME! 6 B/Rs, 7)4 baths on appro*. 2 
acres — Princeton address. One-of-a-kind design offering 
the quality and durability of the past combined with the im- 
aginative and futuristic systems of tomorrow. 10,000 sq. ft. 
of luxury — the ultimate in entertaining and family comfort 
along with the most sophisticated technology in heating, 
cooling, recreation and security. Extraordinary and ex- 
quisite! $2,200,000 

PRINCETON BOROUGH IDEAL LOCATION, 
GRACIOUS THREE-STORY HOME -living room with 
fireplace, separate dining room, modern kitchen and Yi bath 
on first floor. Three bedrooms and full bath on second floor. 
Beautiful third floor studio with large bath. Full basement. 
Parking for four cars. $295,000 

LAND 

MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP - 57!iacres. Zoned R-l. 
NOW $3O.000/acre 

j 6+ ACRES — REED ROAD. HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 
near 195. Zoned "Special Industrial." Has small ranch. 

Now $325,000 

RENTAL 

WEST WINDSOR — 3/4 bedroom split level home on an 
acre. $850 per mo. plus util. 



BEAUTIFUL SPLIT LEVEL TOWNHOME BACK- 
ING UP TO LAKE - Living room, formal dining room, 
eat-in kitchen. 1)4 baths, 2 B/Rs, bath. Finished base- 
ment East Windsor. $99,900 



COUNTRY LIVING, yet close to Turnpike and major 
highways, in small town of Roosevelt Very nice single 
Ranch home on )4 acre wooded lot. Foyer, living room, 
dining room, 3 bedrooms, den/office or 4th bedroom, 2 
baths, laundry room. Only $125,000 



KENDALL PARK - So. Brunswick Twp. Spacious Ranch 
on large comer lot. 3-4 bedrooms, living room, formal din- 
ing room, remodelled kitchen, family room addition, cen- 
tral air and attached garage. Don't miss it.Now $139,900 



SOMERVIEW ESTATES 

in Rural Millstone 
from $231,90O 

BROOKSIDE ESTATES 

in folly wooded area of Millstone 
horn $349,900 

This property is within approximately 10 miles of New 
Jersey Turnpike Exit 8, Route 33, and other major routes 
and fine residential areas at one of the highest points in 
Millstone Township. Directions: From Exit 8 of NJTP. 
take Rte. 33 East for 4.5 miles, turn right onto Millstone 
Road and continue to Monmouth County 1 (Sweetman's 
Lane) and make a left to Somerview Estates trailer on 
left. 

Sale* Office (201) 446-2873 or (201) 577-8990 
Tuesday-Sunday 10:00 to 5:00 



IDEAL FOR THE PROFESSIONAL OR SCHOLARLY FAMILY, this custom Colonial has large, gracious rooms, fi 

and a library/den. Sited on a lovely Riverside Vt acre, it is 1-2 blocks from Lake Carnegie, Riverside School, the Playground 

and close to Princeton University, 1st time on the market. $429,000 



PRINCETON - Two slde-by-side Condos right in the 
center of town! Walk to everything!! Each two story condo 
has living room-dining room combination. Eat-in kitchen on 
first floor and 2 B/Rs and bath on 2nd floor. Both have pull- 
down stairs to attic space. Each condo has its own garage 
and private, fenced-in yard. Kitchens and baths are com- 
pletely renovated. Hardwood floors throughout. $295, 000 

COMMERCIAL 

GOOD COMMERCIAL OPPORTUNITY. Auto Restora- 
tion Business and/or property — good location — 4,500 sq. 
ft. building on 1.2 acres. Access 7-A. Allentown area. 

Business & Property: $650,000 

COMMERCIAL RENTALS 

COMMERCIAL SPACE - Outside storage space - 
suitable for automobiles, trucks, school buses, and others 
— next to active business. 5,500 sq. ft. to 15,000 sq. ft. of 
macadam with fencing. $1,000 to $3,000 per mo. 

PRINCETON BOROUGH within 1 block of Princeton 
University. 2,000 sq. ft. Nouj $3,500 per mo. 

HIGHTSTOWN — center of town -^ 2nd floor space: 2.546 
sq. ft. at $1,458 per mo. 



OUR COMPETENT STAFF CAN SHOW YOU ANY PROP ERTY , N THE AREA - CALL ANY T.ME 



^^i^ ' ^i^ ^ULLLLUa^i XTTTI I i iiii.i.i.ij.i.i.i.m,i.i.i.i.i.i.i.i.i m|h M . i 

2 (f'Unc^cn 0fflux <(^K 






- 



-' 



5 



366 JVateau SPlteei 

Puitcekm, jV.g. 08540 

609-924-7784 



STEWARDSON-DOUGHERTY 



609-896-8100 



FOR 
RENT 



OUTSTANDING PRINCETON CONTEMPORARY in 

a quiet Township setting. Marvelous feeling of space 
in cathedral ceiling living room with fireplace, separate 
dining room, family room with raised brick fireplace and 
doors to deck. Spacious, totally modern kitchen with 
Jennair range and loads of cabinets. Four bedrooms, 
two and one-half baths, central air. Large deck 
overlooking landscaped acre plus lot. Two-car garage. 
Available June 1 unfurnished for one year or possibly 
longer. $2600 per month 













1 h 


\j r 




l-l!il 


giNh 


i 


ji 


j^W * w» 


- W ' ^2 


<f ** M 


** f~' - *m „ 


-; X 




•'**"*' <J£ '-* A*i^^ 








HISTORIC MT. ROSE 

This charming late 1 8th century two-story salt box house is in Historic Mt. 
Rose, Hopewell Township. It is light, airy and in excellent condition. The 
country setting is only two miles from Hopewell Borough, four miles from 
Pennington and five miles from Princeton Borough. It has eight rooms, 
including four bedrooms, two baths and a barn-garage with a woodshed! 

$228,000 




PROVINCE LINE ROAD 



This comfortable Bucci-built Colonial is located on a secluded three-plus 
acre lot in the estate section on this prestigious road. Center entry hall, 
living room with attractive bay window, formal dining room, family room 
with fireplace, spacious kitchen with breakfast space, half bath, and laun- 
dry. Upstairs, a master suite with walk-in closet and connecting bath, plus 
three more bedrooms and full bath. Full, finished basement; central air; 
two-car garage. Princeton mailing address but low Lawrence Township 
taxes. $535,000 



SECLUDED AND SURPRISING 

This very spacious, historic Colonial has lots of original architectural 
features plus the unexpected — a large contemporary wing for added 
living space or in-law apartment. In total, fifteen rooms and four and a 
half baths. Sited at the end of a long private lane on a high two acres 
with shade trees and views to lovely meadows. All surprisingly conve- 
nient _ three minutes from Route 1 and ten minutes from Palmer Square. 
Call for details. ' $495,000 




This beautifully built brick- Williamsburg story and a half Coton-a ^ 
conveniently located within walking distance of tow " ^ U^Sfen ry 
just a step from New York and local buses. A ves ,b le ^ w-de en ry 
hall lead to a large living room w^f.rep^e an sou Maong I ay* m 
dow, separate formal dining room, cozy ^J eroomtotex . 
bookshelves, powder room, efficient kitche ana u 
pansion. Upstairs a master bedroom w' h f ^ parage, slate roof, 
bedrooms and tile bath. Screened porch a«ache ^re s hade trees, 
and central air. All sited on a lovely half acre wnn $468i0 oo 

a box garden, and spacious lawn areas. 
PRINCETON OFFICE 



PARKSIDE DRIVE 



Come see this attractive, spacious Colonial on a quiet street in the historic 
Battlefield area of Princeton Township. There is a large formal living room 
with fireplace, dining room, family room and large country kitchen. Open- 
ing off the living room is a lovely, spacious (35x14) heated sun room. There 
are eight bedrooms and six baths, two car garage, full basement and 

more. . 

LAWRENCEVILLE OFFICE 



$510,000 



Claire Burns 

Julie Douglas 

Belsy Stewardson Ford 

Anne Gallagher 



Peggy Kercher 
Ted Kopp 
Betty McClelland 
Mary MeHale 



Jsnet A. Mitchell 
Judy Perrine 
J.B. Smith 
Valerie Young 
Emma Wlrtz 



Robert E. Dougherty, Broker 
REALTORS 

William E. Stewardson (1935-1972) 



Dorothy Field, Manager 
Barbara Broad 
Donna Buxton 
Eileen Coleman 
Wade Coleman 
Marge Dwyer 



Anne Marie Gotz 
Betsey Harding 
Josephine McCarthy 
Lyn Pope 
Lois Richard 
Jeanne 



L< Anne Gallagher Mary MeHale Z™. wlrtz mi™...- . Marge uwyer — ™ 



>pe ;■ 

Ichard m 

> Weber Jt 

;-rvr.TTTt 



Audrey C. Short 

Real Estate Broker 

163 Nassau Street 

921-9222 



' »9 NISSAN 240 SX: 5 speed, red. 
15,000 miles, power/sport packages, 
sunrool, mint condition $10,500 883- 
4169 4-10-21 



• FABRICS 

• DRAPERIES 

• SLIPCOVERS 

• FURNITURE 
REPAIRS 

DEWEY'S 

Upholstery Shop 

33 Station Drive 
Princeton Junction 

799-1778 



SCHWINN 

BICYCLES 



<s>% 



SAlFSc SERVICE 



...where quality 
comes firstl 

KOPP'S CYCLE 

EST. 18B1 

38 Spring Street 
Princeton, NJ 

924-1052 



MURALS A DECORATIVE PAINTING 
Tom Sheeran, 921-7024, 4-3-3I 

HOUSE CLEANING: Don't worry. I'll 
clean your house lor you. Just give me 
a call References, own transportation. 
Call 609-452-1740 4-3-31 

PRINCETON - OWNER'S SALE: 

Pnncelon Township, Ihree-bedroom, 
Iwo-and-a-hall-balh custom home on 
approximately two wooded acres in 
prime localion Living room with 
fireplace, dining room, kilchen and 
breakfast area Attached double ga- 
rage, expandable attic, garden shed, 
work shop and much more Carefully 
maintained by original owner 
$525,000 Call 609-924-7724 No 
brokers please. 4-3-31 

HOUSE FOR SALE: Highlstown, 2 bed- 
room bungalow, across from park 
Fenced-in yard One-car garage with 
workshop. $129,000 Call Peyton Asso- 
ciates Realtor, 737-9550 for appoint- 
ment 4-3-31 

LAWN CARE SERVICE: Get ready for 
(his season. Call me now Free estimate. 
609-452 1740 4-3-31 

TRICKY TRAY: Princeton First Aid 
Building, North Harrison Street, April 
22 Doors open 6:30 p.m., auction 8 
p m. $3 at door. Hoi dogs lor purchase. 
Inlormalion: call Cindy 924-6928. 

4-3-31 

LOOKING FOR A JOB cleaning and 

doing laundry. Call after 6 p.m. 609- NASSAU STREET F0R RENT; CBD 

prime visibility lor retail, lood, service 
business. 600 sq. It. $1,200 a month 
plus utilities. Immediate occupancy. Call 
4-3-3I 



.EXPERIENCED FREELANCE Book- 

keeper: Will work in my home for small 
business or professionals Reasonable 
rales Pick-up and delivery. Call 215- 
321-7299 4-10-21 

LATERAL FILE: two-drawer for hang- 
ing files, wooden, 29" long. 20" deep. 
$50 Call 683-5041 4-10-21 

CONDOMINIUM FOR SALE: Plains 
boro Owner must sell one-bedroom As- 
pen, first floor All appliances, new w/w 
carpeting, pool, tennis Move in now 
$69,500 Call owner. 609-275-1875 
4-10-2t 

POSITION WANTED by capable lady 
Housekeeping, babysitting, or other 
Some nursing experience French 
speaking, light English Please call Ad- 
vanced Janitorial Cleaning Services, 
Inc. 393-3965. 4-10-21 

PRINCETON AREA: House sitter or 
house boy lor hire Call 609-924-9863. 
ask lor Ivan 4-10-21 



FOR RENT: Bright, comfortable room 
by ihe day, week or month Near the 
University Call (609) 921-9417 

TOWN TOPICS classified ads gel 
results 



TABLE, SOLID CHERRY drop-leaf, an- 
tique. 66" x 45" open. $200 Call 683- 
0198 4-10-21 



HOUSE FOR SALE BY OWNER: 

bedroom Colonial. 2Vz baths, across 456-3344 
from elementary school. Zoned proles- 



^KtTn'TSl 'flnTsTsV'floli BETIHED COUPLE WISHES .0 

eat-in kilchen Call 882-8153. 4-10-21 nouses( , lumlsned 3 . becI , 00m „ ouse , 



luxury apartment in of near Princeton 
FRENCH AU PAIR, 22. reliable, ex- Irom May 1st. Short or long term. Some 
penenced, athletic, horse rider Speaks remuneration depending on terms, 
english Good references Available all Finders lee to Realtor or Agent $500 
or part ol summer 924-3657 4-10-21 Call20l-350-5875andleavemessage. 

4-10-21 



MONTGOMERY TOWNSHIP: Private 1 



bedroom apartment on quiet street SECOND FLOOR APARTMENT: two 

$600 month Ask lor Margie Boozer bedrooms, living room, kitchenette and 

Audrey Short. Inc Broker. 921-9222. bath. $750 includes all utilities and park- 

4-10-21 | n g Call 921-2623. 4-10-21 



TOWNHOUSE RENTAL: Princeton H0U SE TRAILER: sleeps three, electric 
Junction, brand new. Walk to train. 2 refrigerator. kitchBn, excellent condition 
bedrooms, 2Vi baths. Available im- Now cos , j 2i ooo. will sell lor $750 
mediately. $1,200 month Call Audrey Dodge Aspen slalion „ j^,, 

Shon. Inc Broker. 921-9222. Ask tor Two-person bicycle, make oiler. 609- 
Marge While. 4-10-21 452-2139. 4-10-21 



PcyfiHi 



ANOTHER NEW PRINCETON LISTING 




WESTERN BOROUGH LOCATION in a section steeped 
in history is this elegant brick in-town house. From the 
entrance hall is a lovely living room with fireplace and 
bookcases, spacious formal dining room with doors to 
flagstone terrace, a first floor den or bedroom with full 
bath, kitchen and pantry. Upstairs you will find a master 
suite with dressing room and bath, two other family bed- 
rooms and a second full bath. There is a lovely garden 
and garage. The house is absolutely charming and the 
location — close to university, Seminary and "Dinky" is 
ideal. Offered at $625,000 

Peyton Associates 

Realtors 

Princeton Pennington 

609-921-1550 609-737-9550 



I FOUND IT! 
^E^T •< the 

PRINCETON 
RECORD EXCHANGE 
/&- 921-0881 





' || n Ind & 3rd Generation Fence Crallers - 

' SUBURBAN FENCE 



Over 100 styles ol Gales S Fences 
609-695-3000 8 £5'oo 

NEW LOCATION 
532 lAMMMry St. Jvft oft Rt. 1 



iJIhB 



"— ''^JCTESiM eb &$ Brrifi 




Call Coldwell Banker 



SCHLOTT REALTORS" 




PRINCETON 

NEW LISTING 

This 4 bedroom, 3 bath home is terrific for indoor and outdoor living. 
2 fireplaces, finished rec room, screened porch, inground pool, private 
yard. Move right in. $379,000. PRN1009. 



10 Nassau Street, Princeton • 921-1411 



HOPEWELL TOWNSHIP 




- 



COUNTRY LIVING 
3+ ACRES, BARN, PADDOCK 
Exquisite 3 years young colonial. 3,400 square feet of wonderful 
living space. Dramatic open entry foyer, large eat-in gourmet 
kitchen, sunken family room with brick fireplace and Palladian 
doors, library, spacious master bedroom with Jacuzzi in master 
bath — 7 skylights, 3-car garage and more! $454,000 

RICHARD A 




rK^^ 



CORPORATION 

REALTORS 



Since 1915 



164 Nassau Street 

Princeton, New Jersey 08542 

609-921-2700 



laalieterencss 

pe ter iLTiiespntm 

Custom Pointing 

— Plus 



921-3609 



!^S 3^00 Princeton area/free estimates 



ai feS3 Spraying 

pressure washing 

drywaS taping 
special coatings 
wan repairs 
masonry repairs 

siding repairs 

flutter repaira- replace 
basement sealing 
^wwafivemilwork-trim 
glasswork 
general repairs . . , 



MUSIC,AN.p H IVATE pART|ES WM 

o»T., a "1 e " e " ls p '°'«S'°<>al 
PWt/vocala with vaned styles from 
'went,es, 0IM Has fransportabie 
Piano Call 924-3170 6 ™m 

"AHIS. FRANCE: Elegant, small studto 
? ( , pa ",™ n ' '<>' '=«. wst otl the Seme, m 
the 6th Arrondissement (Latin Quarter! 
R»e minute walk to the Louvre. Notre 
°™„! lc - Rent b, the week or month 
(609) 924-4332 10-24-rt 



Elec Cont. Lie. #6651 
Elec. Inspector Lie. #2828 
Fire Inspector Lie. #2828 
Subcode Official Lie. #2828 



RESIDENTIAL 

COMMERCIAL 

HOME INSPECTIONS 

RENOVATIONS 



GEORGE JOHNSON S SON 

ELECTRICAL CONTRACTOR 

Serving Princeton for over 25 Years 



(609) 921 -9288 or 921 -WATT 



Princeton, N.J. 



CRAFTSMAN AVAILABLE: Interior- 

exterior repairs, new work. Carpentry 
masonry, painting, gutter, etc. $100 

Speagle 895-9876 Leave message on 
machine. ,*,.„.„ 



RUBBER STAMPS 

School or college address 

Home, business zip code 

Rubber stamps ot all kinds and 

sizes made to your order at 

Hlnksort's 
82 Nassau 



MAN AROUND THE HOUSE: Carpen 
try. electric and plumbing $30 service I 
call Phone Tom at 609-443-3845 

3-13-tf | 

DISCOVER RISING SUN BOOKSHOP: 

33 West Broad Street, Hopewell Used 
books at affordable prices Bring your 
unwanted books tor cash or trade For 
details call 466-4465 4-10-rf 

PROFESSIONAL EDITING/DESKTOP 
Publishing: Word processing & edting 
on our computers or yours, from draft 
to camera-ready copy, specializing in 
academic papers Research assistance 
also available. 683-0448 3-6-101 

WHY RENT? $15/call, live in our proper- 
ties and we'll make you the owner 
S1200down, $100!month. 1-900-234- 
3733. 4-3-61 

VALE STUDENT. 20. seeks live-in posi- 
tion lor housekeeping, child care, etc 
Available May-August. Rales negotia- 
ble Reply: PO Box 325. Yale Station, 
New Haven , Conn. 06520 4-3-61 

AIRPORT DRIVING SERVICE: I will 
drive you to all airports, and pick you 
up when you return, your car or mine 
Call 924-3985. 1-30-fl 



Maman 924-8027 

Construction 



Custom Homes • Additions • Renovations 

Office/Store Alterations • llaths • Kitchens 
, parages • Decks • Porches • Bookcases 



• Hay Windows & Sliding Class Doors 
Stereo Cabinets • Morgan Doors • Closets 



Quality • Reliability '• References 



CROSSROADS 



LAND — Building lots — All approvals — six, 3 acre lots. Rolling, partially wooded 
& treed land. Princeton Address. Lawrence. Starting at $250,000 

Fantastic value — treed, subdividable into building lots. Close to Cranbury. East 
Windsor. $500,000 

Ideal for the commuter. 2 B/R, 2 bath. 1st floor condominium — Plainsboro.$89,900 




LUXURIOUS CONDO - across from 
Mountain Lakes Nature Preserve. 3 B/Rs, 
2V2 baths. Asking $240,000 



PRINCETON condos - 3 B/Rs, high ceil- 
ings, garages, nice yard. Walk everywhere. 
$167,000 & $169,000 



RETREAT FOR THE BUSY FAMILY - 

Western section. 4 B/Rs, 3 baths. Magnifi- 
cent grounds. $285,000 




HAMILTON — 3 B/R Cape Cod, full finish- 
ed basement. Quiet neighborhood. 
$132,900 



PRINCETON — Lovely lot with brook and 
flowering trees, a home with that rare com- 
modity - charm. 4 B/Rs. $339,000 



LUXURY AND CONVENIENCE - Stunn- 

ing one-of-a-kind house. 4 B/Rs. Princeton. 

$815,000 




LAWRENCEVILLE — Premium lot with 
vista of greenery & woods. Step-down L/R, 
4 large B/Rs. $299,000 



PRINCETON — IN-TOWN LOCATION - 

£> B/R, 2 1 /2 bath townhouse. Overlooks 
brook.' $199,500 



PRINCETON'S WESTERN SECTION — 

Ranch, large rooms. Good storage. Huge 
trees, lovely lot. $395,000 




BEAUTIFULLY MAINTAINED 2 B/R, 2 
branch. Princeton Landing^ 
location 



KINGSTON — Center hall ranch, Mins. to 
Palmer Sq./block from NY bus. F/R with 
beams and fireplace. $209,500 



BORO TOWNHOUSE luxurious, 2 blocks! 
University. Deck, att. garage, free overnight' 
parking. $315,000 



Linda Carnevale 
Aniuta Blanc 
Laraine Bender 
Beth Carnevale 
Lois Fee 

Roslynn Greenberg 
Barbara Goldberg 
Florence Helitzer 
Carolyn Hills 



Princeton Crossroads Realty, Inc. 

Call Anytime 609-924-4677 • Open 7 Days 

342 Nassau Street (Corner Harrison) » Princeton « Park in our lot 



Anne Hoffmann 
Bobette Lister 
Laura Procaccino 
Linda Roberts 
Elaine Schuman 
Aurora Seeley 
Helen Brener Smith 
Hazel Stix 
Rena White 



SPECS Unltd. 

Margaret Briggs, Optician 

DESIGNER EYEWEAR 

195 Nassau St- • Princelon 
921-3815 



C.J. Skillman Co. 

Furniture Repairing 

Upholstery 

924-0221 

36 Spring Street 



EVERETT PIANOS FOR SALE: Prole* 
sonal uprigril, walnut, sold by Sleinway 
as alternative to its upright, $1 ,675 An- 
lique mahogany upright, carved Iront, 
S600 (201) 545 9775 



LAWRENCEVILLE: Nassau II ranch on 
lovely quiet street Three bedrooms, liv- 
ing room, dining room, lamily room. eat- 
In kitchen, two tiled baths, central air. 
hardwood lloors, laundry room, partially 
finished basement, 1 -car garage Nicely 
landscaped tot Convenient to schools, 
shopping, library and transportation By 
owner 8835578 $185,500 



MONTGOMERY 

PHARMACY 

& GIFTS 

Montgomery Center 

(Next to Friendly's) 

Rocky Hill, N.J. 

924-7123 



ROOM FOR RENT: 1 Va miies Irom cen- 
ler ol Princeton Pleasant garden, park- 
ing, refrigerator, share bath $310/- 
monih, utilities included Male, 
nonsmoker (609) 924-7448 Refer- 
ences 



ROOM WANTED IN EXCHANGE for 

housework by single (English speaking) 
woman with experience and references 
m Princelon No child care. Leave 
message at (609) 921-2643 



TOWN TOPICS 
CLASSIFIED AD RATES 

$5 for 25 words, per inser- 
tion, 5 cents for each addi- 
tional word. Box number 
ads 50 cents extra. Payment 
of ad within six days after 
publication saves 50 cents 
billing charge. 

Cancellations must be 
made by 5 p.m. Monday: 
reorders by 5 p.m. Tuesday, 
the week of publication. 

Ads may be called in, 
924-2200, mailed to P.O. Box 
664, Princeton, or brought to 
the Town Topics office, 4 
Mercer Street. 




Mon-Wed 9:30-6:00 

Thur-Fri 9:30-9:00 

Saturday 9:30-6:00 

Sunday 12:00-5:00 

At the sign of the goose.® 



MINK COAT: FULL LENGTH, white 
with black Medium-long. Excellent con- 
dition. $700 Call 987-0626 

SEAN ROONEY AVAILABLE for all 
types of masonry Flagstones, bricks, 
block concrele. No [Ob too small. Call 
883-9166 

SCHWINN TANDEM BI0YCLE lor sale 
Red, 5-speed, excellent condrtion. $350 
or best offer Call 799-0685. 

MAHOGANY KITTINGER Hepplewhite- 
■ . i v i > ■ sideboard with book, line and fan 
inlay Large 6-branch crystal chande- 
lier Pine corner cupboard Mahogany 
game table, cherry drop-leal table, pine 
2-part hutch. Two mahogany Georgian 

slant Iront desks. Two tall case clocks. Electrical contractor Complete resident- 
Porcelain lamps and much more. Field ial, commercial/industrial wiring service. 
Antiques. 49 Slate Road, Princelon. New service. New oullets. Remodeling. 
921-0303. kitchen, etc. Bonded-insured, License 

No. 8179. Tel. (609) 924-2684. 

FOR SALE: PT. PLEASANT BEACH 

condo Furnished 1 -bedroom efficien- 
cy. Sunny corner unit. V/t blocks from 
beach. Excellent buy at $79,000. 
Assumable mortgage at 8% Call 497- 
3226. 



SPRING CLEANING 

It's that time ot year. 
I specialize in landscaping, gardening, 
fertilizing, etc. Call John for a free 
estimate. 

921-6877 3-27-51 

WORD PROCESSING/DESKTOP 
PUBLISHING: Macintosh and IBM PC. 
Business presentations, graphics, and 
editing; camera-ready books, reports, 
manuals with Word/Pagemaker; corres- 
pondence, resumes, and transcription; 
foreign language and statislical Fax, 
copying, telecomunications. Near 
Princeton University Call Fastidious 
Word Processing. (609) 921-1621. 

8-15-tf 



DAN L. NOVACOVICI 



ATTENTION JOB HUNTERS: Meet the 

3,000 employers in the Greater Prince- 
ton business community through the 
1991 U.S. 1 Business Directory. In- 
cludes contact name, mailing address, 
size of company, description, phone, 
STORE FOR RENT: Central Nassau fax Send cneck , or $9 95 t0 y s , 
Street corner Available now. Recently Directory- 870 Mapleton Road, Prince- 



decorated. 924-2040. 



Ion, N.J. 08540. 



3-27-tl 




QUIET COUNTRY LIVINC.yet in Princeton and close 
enough to town for easy access. This wonderful private 
hideaway, nestled on over two acres of peaceful wood- 
land, offers an ideal setting for family living. 

The house at the end of a long entrance drive is de- 
signed for flexibility and maximum privacy. There is a 
master suite including master bath and exercise/hot-tub 
room with big windows overlooking secluded property. 
There is separate guest area, a quiet section for children, 
study, as well as handsome living room with beamed ceil- 
ing and fireplace, formal dining room with a country 
French flavor, modern kitchen, enormous cathedral family 
room with fireplace and separate apartment for relatives 
or rental. This unique and tasteful country house is of- 
fered at $675,000 

Peyton Associates 

Realtors 

Princeton Pennington 

609-921-1550 609-737-9550 







RtCallawcT 

Real Estate Broker ^J 



, 




New Listing 

What is so rare as — an enchanting stone Cotswold cottage 
reminiscent of the English countryside! Fortunately, one can be 
found in a flowering garden in the historic village of 
Lawrenceville. Handsome panelling graces the living room 
with a fireplace and door to terrace, and the spacious dining 
room. The kitchen is sparkling white with accents of blue. Up- 
stairs — a wide hall, the master bedroom with adjoining study, 
two delightful dormered bedrooms and tiled bath. On the lower 
level, a panelled room with fireplace. A secluded rear yard is 
bordered by a picturesque brook. You'll love it! $230,000 



SOTHEBY'S 

IhaCRNMIONAL mm 



Four Nassau Street Princeton, New Jersey 08542 (609)921-1050 



Qd/eie/uM 



/ 



K 




/ 



OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY 1-5 P.M. 

Princeton — Private 1.5 acre woodland setting complements 
open, dramatic interior with two stone fireplaces, sunken 
whirlpool in master bath, and solarium. $575,000 

Directions: Great Road (Elm Road) to 98 Heather Lane. 





Gracious Living in Foxcroft - This 5-year-old colonial situated 
on 1.4 acres affords its new owner many amenities for wonderful 
family living & entertaining. Some of the exceptional features in- 
clude stained wooden six-panel doors, Andersen windows through- 
out, inground 20x40 pool, three-car attached garage, and profes- 
sional landscaping. Make your appointment now to view this 
special property. Offered at $439,000 



Princeton — This custom built contemporary home is beautifully 
situated in a wooded setting in one of Princeton's most prestigious 
western sections. Skylights, Pella windows and vaulted ceilings 
bring the outdoor scenery into the living areas and the lower level 
features bedrooms and a family room making this home ideal for 
a erowine family or in-laws. Master bedroom has its own study 
and bath Offered at $410,000 





New Listing - This light *^»£%™£& 

onia. in Princeton offers a — de of ^ ^ plus exer . 
wilUove the fimshed basement with recrea^^ ^ g ^ 

rise room, Jacuzzi^ to f ™ hjs 2 e ' ar . ld home is situated 
heating/cooling and much more^ 1^ «y tion Cal] now! 

on a private cul-de-sac and is awaiting V om ^ d t $569 00 n 



New Listing - This meticulously maintained 4 bedroom, 2 bath 
custom built home in Princeton's western section is offered at a 
most affordable price! Situated near Mountain Lakes Preserve 
and parks, it offers access to community activities and insures 
the privacy of a cul-de-sac location. Special features include a sun 
room overlooking a lovely treed yard and bluestone terrace. 

Price — $267,500 




CAPITAL 

PROPERTIES 

GROUP® 



Open 7 Days (609) 921-1900 
350 Nassau Street, Princeton 



Weichert 




Employment Opportunities 
in the Princeton Area 



ATHLETIC DEPT. SECRETARY: The 

Princeton YWCA is seeking a full-time 
athletic department secretary Must 
have 45 wpm, good word process- 
ing/computer skills (IBM and Word- 
Perfect preferred) and be highly 
organized to meet daily deadlines lor 3 
directors Enjoy diversity and Inendly at- 
mosphere Salary in mid-leens. Send 
resume or contact Lin DuBois at (609) 
497-2100. 4-17-41 

POSTAL JOBS: S1 1 41 to $14 90 per 

hour. For exam and apphcalion infor- 
mation call 1-800-999 9838. Ext 
NJ188 8 am-8 pm. 7 days 4-17-51 

RECEPTIONIST: TEMPORARY posi 
tion is open at the Institute lor Advanc- 
ed Study in Princeton. Duties include 
sending faxes and telexes, functioning 
as chiel operator on the Inslitule's 
Dimension telephone console and mi- 
nor cashier tasks Compelitive hourly 
salary for ihis 35-hour 9-5 position In- 
terested individuals should call Rober- 
la Gernhardt at 609-734-8245 4-17-21 



TELEPHONE SALES 
Business to Business Marketing 

Part-time hours, 8:45- 1 2:45 or 1 -5. M-F 

Full-lime hours, 845-5, M-F 
Base pay up to $8/hour plus bonus! 



Enthusiasm and dependability are a 
must! Call Kim al (609) 921-7200 lo 

schedule an interview, 

MARKET DIRECT AMERICA 

162 Wall Street 

Princeton, NJ 06540 

4-17 21 

SEAMSTRESS- FULL OR PART TIME 

lor Nassau Street clolhing store Flexi- 
ble hours Piecework - mostly applique. 
Call Great Impressions, 497-0022 

3-27-tf 

HELP WANTED: MANAGEMENT posi- 
tion available lor college clolhing store 
on Nassau Street Call (609) 497-0022. 
Ask lor Tony 3-27-tf 



WANTED: LOVING, ENERGETIC 

mature woman - experienced 
housekeeper and cook - lo help moth- 
er and small child Ihrough a New York 
divorce and relocation lo Princeton. 
l_ive*ln (Brooklyn Heights brownstone 
with yard) through mid-summer Driv- 
er's license and sense of humor essen- 
tial. Call 718-237-9781 (references. 



Perfec 



PETER ALLEM 
609-921-3907 
609-448-7904 

SERVTNO PRINCETON AREA 

Pitch 



C OBSTRUCTION 



RENOVATIONS 
ALL HOME REPAIRS 
REMODEUNQ 



FULLY INSURED 
FREE ESTIMATES 
LOCAL REFERENCES 



*' & SON ^ 

WALLPAPER & PAINTS 



Mursio Paints • Benjamin Moore Palnta 
Martin Sanour Williamsburg Palms 
Wallcoverings & Art Suppllts 
200 r/assau SI 924-0058 



HP 



SjlIM^ 




Princeton Small Animal 
Rescue League 



SAVE 



The Princeton Small Animal Rescue 
League SAVE is a private, non- 
profit, animal shelter that cares for 
lost or abandoned cats and dogs in 
the Princeton area. It is supported al- 
most entirely by contributions and is 
the only service of its kind in 
Princeton. 

If you lose a pet or find a stray con- 
tact our executive director, Mrs. 
Graves or call small animal control 
officer, Mr. Heavener, at 924-2728 
and leave a message. Also call the 
WHWH Pet Patrol, 924-3600. If 
you're interested in adopting a pet 
call Mrs. Graves. 

Be sure your dog or cat is inoculated 
against rabies. Remember to have 
your pet spayed or neutered. 

Mrs. A. C. Graves, Executive Director 

900 Herrontown Road 

Princeton, New Jersey 08540 

609-921-6122 



ARCHITECT'S OFFICE: 32 hours. 4 
days, word processor - proficient in 
Word Perfecl 5.0. Also bookkeeper, 7 
hours - payroll, laxes, etc. (609) 924- 

1818. 

EXPERIENCED TEACHERS WANTEO 

for Jewish pre-school. Three or five 
morning oplions available. Also in- 
terested in creative, experienced He- 
brew teachers. Contact Dr. Silberman, 
609-921-0102 

HOME WORK ■ SPARE TIME: Paint 

lovely miniature toys, earn $20 set. No 
experience necessary, and no invest- 
ment required. Fun lor the whole fami- 
ly Amazing recorded message reveals 
details. Call anytime 1-900-288-2245. 
Phone leB. 4-17-21 

EARN 530O/S500 PER WEEK reading 
books at home. Call 1-615-473-7440, 
Ext. B-731 4-3-41 

WANTEO - OFFICE CLEANING HELP 
lor part-time work in Princeton, after 6 

p.m. Five days a week. Please call Er- 
nie, 924-0449. 4-3-31 

NEEDED: Full lime childcare in Prince- 
Ion, M-F, for 1 to 4 school-age children 
depending on day. Musi drive. Call 
Karen, days, 924-6409, alter 8 p.m.. 
921-6261. 4-3-3t 

COUNTER HELP WANTED: lor Sweet 
Obsessions Cafe in Kingston. Full or 
part lime; llexible hours. Responsible, 
mature and self-motivated, please! Call 
609-924-1177. 4-10-2t 

REAL ESTATE SALESPERSON: Part 
lime. New home sales. Lawrence Town- 
ship location. License required. 799- 
1608. 4-3-31 

ASSISTANT BOOKKEEPER: Perman- 
enl, part/full lime Small Nassau Slreel 
office. Flexible hours. Call 924-2040 
4-3-41 

EBONY AND IVORY and Barbra s 

Studio seeks experienced manager. 
Must have a warm Iriendly manner, be 
enthusiastic, confident and energetic. A 
most unique opportunily. Please send 
resume to Barbra's Sludio, 57 Prince- 
ton Avenue, Hopewell. N.J. 08525. tf 

SWITCHBOARD OPERATOR: Part/full 
lime. Days, evenings or nights. Nassau 
Street office. 924-2040. 2-7-tf 

HAIR SALON: Position available lor styl- 
ist and manager with clientele, or rent 
chair Hopewell area. Good opportuni- 
ty. Call 609-466-4209. tf 

EARN MONEY Reading books! 
$30.000/yr. income potential. Details. 
(1) 805-962-8000 Ext Y-1436. 4-10-41 

GOVERNMENT JOBS IN YOUR AREA: 
Details wilh location for $9.25 fee to be 
charged lo your phone. Call: 900-226- 
3606. 4-10-4t 

TAKING APPLICATIONS NOWI Call 1- 
900-864-8B84 Warehouse help, 

drivers, mechanics, janitors, security 
guards and several office positions. 
(Top Pay). Open 7 days. $20 phone 
lee. 4-10-41 

GARAGE SALES aren't the only 
bargains lo be lound in TOWN 
TOPICS. 



ASSISTANT TO THE EDITOR: Prince- 
Ion based liberal journal of public policy 
seeks versatile individual willing to han- 
dle a variety ol responsibilities ranging 
from edilonal to clerical. Five afternoons 
a week. Call Alice Chasen at 497-2474 
during business hours. 



Professional 

'PAPERHANGING' 

and PAINTING 

INTERIOR & EXTERIOR 

Resideniial • Commercial 

Prolessional 

Local References 

799-4160 

, MANNY SANTOS 




5» N 

* 1974- 
25 LANGUAGES 

Native teachers and trans- 
lators. Instruction tor children 
and adults. All levels. Intensive 
courses for travelers and busi- 
ness people. Tutoring. 
Translation. 

Call (609) 921-2252 



Princeton • Routes 27 & 318 (Franklin Two.) 



Marketplace 

Savings up to 70% EVERYDAY. 



r niation. call (201) 583-8700. 




-tkt$<u*-,ijPkci 



NOW HIRING! 

BASIC SERVICE MECHANICS 

Excellent opportunity for ambitious people to work in a modern 
service center with the latest equipment. Must have own tools. 
Many company benefits including: 

• Paid Vacation 

• Paid Sick Days 
• Paid Holidays 

• Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

•HMO 

• Dental Plan 

• Uniforms supplied 

Please apply in person or call: 

Mercer Mall Whitehorse Ave. at Kuser Rd. 

Lawrenceville, NJ Hamilton Twp., NJ>' 

609-452-2777 609-585-970» 



\ 






l*cyfon 



HERE'S THAT SOMETHING SPECIAL! 




IN PRINCETON'S WESTERN SECTION a handsome 
and luxurious residence. This magnificent house has 
splendid two-story entrance hall with sweeping curved 
stairway and marble floor leading to spacious sunny living 
room with high ceiling and fireplace, cherry panelled li- 
brary with fireplace, large formal dining room and spec- 
tacular family room/kitchen complex. There is a first floor 
bedroom and bath, as well as spacious workroom or of- 
fice. The second floor has lavish master suite with marble 
master bath and private baths for each of the 3 other 
bedrooms. A finished third floor has its own bath. 

Outside you will find beautifully landscaped grounds, 
walled terrace, Belgian block edged driveway, fabulous 
oversized swimming pool with spa and electrically oper- 
ated cover. 

There are so many special features in this house, it sim- 
ply must be seen (By Appointment Only.) Offered 
$1,900,000 



at 



Princeton 

609-921-1550 



Peyton Associates 

Realtors 

Pennington 

609-737-9550 



^k^k^k^k ...These are top rated! 





Hopewell — "Fairview" — a landmark and one of the most ele- 
gant Greek Revival houses in the area. On about 8 acres, the origi- 
nal house dates back to the 1700's. Expanded around 1835, it has 
now been restored to its original grandeur. $875,000 



Princeton — A quaint Colonial — a charming picture postcard of 
the early days on historic Mercer Street. Gracious living areas, and 
a sunlit solarium overlooking secluded yard. Upstairs — four bed- 
rooms, 2 with fireplaces, and two baths. $750,000 







Princeton — "Mansgrove c. 1722" — A plaque on the gateway 
proudly proclaims its heritage. Once the master house of a large 
estate, it now maintains seclusion on 3 acres. The wide center hall 
opens to gracious rooms with high ceilings. $975,000 





Princeton — Originally built as a hunting lodge, with two addi- 
tions in recent years, this stone and stucco house won an Architec- 
tural Award. On 5 beautiful acres, it offers four bedrooms and Vh 
baths. Charm is created by many unusual features. $875,000 



Offered By 



Hunterdon — "Spring Valley Farm" — this estate of 54 acres is 
centrally located for the area's equestrian pursuits. The master 
house has 10,000 sq. ft. of dramatic space. The six stall bam is 
well equipped and there is rolling pasture land. $Z,Z3U,uuu 




Exclusive Affiliate 



Real Estate Broker, 

Four Nassau Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 (609) 921-1050 



SOTHEBYS 

INTERNATIONAL REALTY 



■ 



».TJjr.».«*-jr.».-T*y.» 







Herroniown 
Associates,,, 



at 



THE GLEN 

Distinctive Custom Homes 

BROKERS OPEN HOUSE 

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17TH 
11:00 - 1:00 LUNCH SERVED 




16 KIMBERLY COURT, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 

Distinctive 4 bedroom, 3 & V2 bath Neoclassic Cape in Princeton Township only 1.5 miles from Palmer 
Square. Don't miss out on one of the only new houses UNDER CONSTRUCTION in Princeton. This 
finely detailed home offers great room w/cathedral ceiling, first-floor master suite, and space for future 
expansion plus the amenities found in today's new construction. Call Jones Toland, 609-924-5100, 
John T. Henderson Land and New Homes for further details. $619,000 




10 KIMBERLY COURT, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY 

Plans have just been finalized for this house to be built by Herrontown Associates Inc. This house 
offers 4 bedrooms, 3 & % baths, master bedroom with sitting room on the first floor, elaborate moldings 
throughout, a wonderful kitchen with breakfast area, 2 car attached garage and much more. Please 
call (609) 924-5100 for a brochure today. «g49 qqq 



6 KIMBERLY COURT, PRINCETON, NEW JERSEY - PLANS TO BE DECIDED 

Please feel free to call and meet with the builder to discuss your own ideas. 



JUHIN I 



ESTATES CLUB 



^HENDERSON 

R F A 1 Tnec>J 



INC 



REALTORS 



33 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08542 • (609) 924-5100